Career Development Center

Admission Tests

Many graduate schools require that applicants submit scores on one or more standardized tests such as:
Graduate Record Examination (GRE)
Miller Analogies Test (MAT)

Professional schools usually require that applicants take a specific admission test such as:
The Dental Admission Test (DAT)
The Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT)
The Law School Admission Test (LSAT)
The Medical College Admission Test (MCAT)
The Optometry Admission Test (OAT)
The Pharmacy College Admission Test (PCAT)
The Veterinary College Admission Test (VCAT)

Many graduate schools of education ask applicants to take the Praxis Series tests.

Virtually all graduate and professional schools ask students whose native language is not English to take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), and some also ask for TOEFL's Test of Written English (TWE) or the Test of Spoken English (TSE).

For specific information regarding test dates and fees please contact the Career Development Center.


Graduate Record Examinations

The GRE Program is administered by Educational Testing Service (ETS) of Princeton, New Jersey. The GRE tests are given worldwide at many locations each year under policies established by the Graduate Record Examinations Board, an Independent board affiliated with the Association of Graduate Schools and the Council of Graduate Schools.

The paper and pencil version of the GRE General Test has been replaced by the Computer Based Test (CBT). This contains three sections designed to measure verbal, quantitative, and analytical abilities. Beginning in October 2002, the analytical portion of the test will be replaced with the writing assessment. The GRE is still offered in the paper and pencil version in some remote international locations. At those sites the General Test is given in the morning on each international administration test date.

The version of the General Test offered through the Computer-Based Testing (CBT) Program is an adaptive test known as the Computer Adaptive Test (CAT). The CAT is available year-round at more than 250 test centers throughout the United States. A list of the test centers and phone numbers is provided in the GRE Bulletin. In addition to convenience, the CBT Program offers flexible scheduling, immediate knowledge of scores, and faster score reporting services.

Two new tests have also been created by ETS. The Writing Assessment is currently available. It has two sections, a 45-minute "Present your Perspective on an Issue" and a 30-minute "Analyze an Argument." You can view the complete list of all possible topics for both portions of the test on the GRE web site. A Mathematical Reasoning test will be available soon as well.

The Subject Tests, available in paper and pencil version, are designed to measure knowledge and understanding of subject matter basic to graduate study in specific fields. Each Subject Test lasts 2 hours and 50 minutes. Only one Subject Test may be taken on any given test date. Subject Tests are available in eight areas: cell and molecular biology; biology; chemistry; computer science; literature in English; mathematics; physics and psychology.

Students who, for religious reasons, cannot take tests on Saturday may request a Monday administration immediately following a regular Saturday test date. Nonstandard testing arrangements and test materials are also available for persons with disabilities.

For additional information about the GRE tests and about procedural and policy changes, students should refer to the GRE Information and Registration Bulletin.

Write to Graduate Record Examinations, Educational Testing Service, PO. Box 6000, Princeton, New Jersey 08541-6000. In addition, the GRE phone lines in Princeton (609-771-7670) are open Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. Eastern time for student inquiries, and the phone lines at the California Bay Area office of ETS (510-654-1200) are open from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Pacific time.

Miller Analogies Test

The MAT is published and administered by The Psychological Corporation, a division of Harcourt Brace & Company. The MAT is a high-level mental ability test that requires the solution of 100 problems stated in the form of analogies. The MAT is accepted by over 2,300 graduate school programs as part of their admission process. The test items use different types of analogies to sample general information and a variety of fields, such as fine arts, literature, mathematics, natural science, and social science. Examinees are allowed 50 minutes to complete the test. The MAT is offered at more than 600 test centers in the United States and Canada. For examinee convenience, the test is given on an as needed basis at most test centers. Fees are also determined by each test center.

Additional information about the MAT, including preparatory materials and test center locations, is available from The Psychological Corporation, 555 Academic Court, San Antonio, Texas 78204. Telephone: (210) 299-1061 or (800) 622-3231 (7 a.m. to 7 p.m., Monday through Friday, Central time).

Dental Admission Testing

The DAT Program is conducted by the Department of Testing Services of the American Dental Association. The testing program consists of four examinations covering natural sciences (biology, general chemistry, and organic chemistry), reading comprehension, quantitative reasoning, and perceptual ability. The entire test requires one half day. Information is available from:

Department of Testing Services, American Dental Association, 211 East Chicago Avenue, Suite 1840, Chicago, Illinois 60611-2678. Information about test centers and test application procedures is available by telephone (312-440-2689).

Graduate Management Admission Test

The GMAT is designed to help graduate management schools assess the qualifications of applicants for graduate level programs in business and management. The current GMAT consists of three sections. The total testing time is approximately 4 hours.

The GMAT measures general verbal, mathematical, and analytical writing skills that are developed over a long period of time and are associated with success in the first year of study at graduate schools of management. The quantitative section of the test measures basic mathematical skills and understanding of elementary concepts,the ability to reason quantitatively, solve quantitative problems, and interpret graphic data. The verbal section of the test measures the ability to understand and evaluate what is read and to recognize basic conventions of standard written English. The analytical writing section of the test measures the ability to think critically and communicate complex ideas through writing. The test is given year round on computer.

The test is prepared and administered by Educational Testing Service (ETS) for the Graduate Management Admission Council (GMAC). Students who want to familiarize themselves with the contents of the test may obtain a copy of GMAC's The Official Guide for GMAT Review from ETS for $13.95 ($23.95 to addresses outside the United States). Registration materials are available from Graduate Management Admission Test, P.O. Box 6101, Princeton, New Jersey 08541 -6101. Phone lines (609-771-7330) are open 24 hours a day. If you need to speak to a customer service representative, you should call between 8:30 a.m. and 8 p.m., Monday through Friday.

Law School Admission Test

The Law School Admission Test is a half-day standardized test required for admission to all 193 Law School Admission Council(LSAC) member law schools. It consists of five 35-minute sections of multiple choice questions. Four of the five sections contribute to the test taker's score. These sections include one reading comprehension section, one analytical reasoning section, and two logical reasoning sections. The fifth section typically is used to pretest new test items and to preequate new test forms. A 30 minute writing sample is administered at the end of the test. The writing sample is not scored by the Council; however, copies of the writing sample are sent to all law schools to which you apply. Scores on the LSAT range from 120 to 180; 120 is the lowest possible score and 180 is the highest.

The LSAT is designed to measure skills that are considered essential for success in law school, such as the reading and comprehension of complex text with accuracy and insight; the organization and management of information and the ability to draw reasonable inferences from it; the ability to reason critically; and the analysis and evaluation of the reasoning and argument of others.

The LSAT provides a standard measure of acquired reading and verbal reasoning skills that law schools can use as one of several factors in assessing applicants.

The LSAT is administered at test centers in each of the fifty states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico,Canada and many other countries. It is not given at every test center on every test date. Members of recognized religious groups observing the Sabbath on Saturday may make special arrangements to take the test on the Monday following a Saturday administration (except in June). In addition, special testing accommodations are available for those with disabilities.

The LSAT is offered by the Law School Admission Council.

A registration and information book describing the LSAT, including test dates and registration deadlines, test center locations, and scoring information, as well as other LSAC services and publications, is published annually by LSAC and can be obtained by writing to Law School Admission Council, Box 2000, Newtown, Pennsylvania 18940. Telephone: (215) 968-1001.

Medical College Admission Test (MCAT)

The Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) is designed to help admission committees predict which of their applicants will be successful in medical school and to encourage students interested in medicine to pursue broad undergraduate study in the natural and social sciences and in the humanities. The MCAT assesses mastery of basic biology, chemistry, and physics concepts; facility with scientific problem solving and critical thinking; and writing skills. Four separate scores are reported. The Verbal Reasoning, Physical Sciences, and Biological Sciences sections of the test are composed of multiple choice items; scores are reported on a scale ranging from 1 (lowest) to 15 (highest). The Writing Sample section consists of two 30-minute essays; the score is reported on a scale of J (lowest) to T (highest).

Verbal Reasoning draws upon materials from the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences to assess students' abilities to comprehend, reason, and think critically. The Verbal Reasoning Section does not test subject matter knowledge. The two science sections, Biological Sciences, which assesses biology and biologically related chemistry concepts, and Physical Sciences, which assesses physics and physically related chemistry topics, consist entirely of science problems and assess knowledge of basic, introductory-level science concepts through their application to the solution of science problems. Essay questions on the Writing Sample provide specific topics requiring an expository response. Topics are designed to assess skill in the development of a central idea, synthesis of concepts and ideas, cohesive and logical presentation of ideas, and clear writing.

The MCAT is offered twice a year. The test is given at test centers located in all of the states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, and selected countries. Individuals can arrange for Sunday test dates by presenting evidence that their religious convictions prevent them from taking the examination on Saturday, or if they have an unavoidable conflict. Copies of the Announcement, which contains additional information about the MCAT and complete registration materials, can be requested from MCAT Program Office, P.O. Box 4056, Iowa City, Iowa 52243, beginning February 1.

The PRAXIS Series Tests

The Praxis Series tests include the continuing NTE Programs Core Battery tests, the Specialty Area tests, and the Pre-Professional Skills Tests (PPST) of reading, mathematics, and writing. In addition, The Praxis Series offers Subject Assessments and the computer-based Academic Skills Assessments.

The tests are standardized, secure examinations that provide objective measures of academic achievement for college students entering or completing teacher education programs and for advanced candidates who have received additional training in specific fields.

The Teacher Programs Council advises and assists Educational Testing Service (ETS) in ongoing discussion of policy issues concerning The Praxis Series tests. Although ETS conducts the program, it is assisted and advised by professional educators from all sections of the country. The tests themselves are developed and revised periodically with the assistance of committees of recognized authorities in specific subject fields. These committees are usually appointed from nominations made by appropriate national professional associations.

The Core Battery includes three 2-hour tests of communication skills, general knowledge, and professional knowledge.

Specialty Area and Subject Assessments tests measure understanding of the content and methods applicable to the separate subject areas.

The Pre-Professional Skills Tests consist of three separate 1-hour tests of basic proficiency in communication and computation skills--reading, mathematics, and writing (including an essay).

The computer-based Academic Skills Assessments are available at selected institutional sites and at Sylvan Learning Centers by appointment.

Additional information is available from The Praxis Series, PO. Box 6051, Educational Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey 08541-6051. Telephone: (609) 771-7395 or (800) 772-9476.

Optometry Admission Test

The OAT is prepared and administered by the Optometry Admission Testing Program for applicants seeking admission to schools and colleges of optometry. Given two times each year at established testing centers in the United States and Canada, the test is designed to measure general academic ability and scientific knowledge. The test includes sections on a survey of the natural sciences (biology, general chemistry, and organic chemistry), reading comprehension, quantitative reasoning, and physics.

Pharmacy College Admission Test

The PCAT is published and administered by The Psychological Corporation, a division of Harcourt Brace & Company, under the auspices of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. Designed to measure general academic ability and scientific knowledge, the test includes sections on verbal ability, quantitative ability, reading comprehension, and knowledge of biology and chemistry. The test is given three times each year, February, April, and October, at established testing centers in the United States and Canada. Sunday testing may be arranged for applicants presenting satisfactory evidence that their religious convictions prevent their taking the examination on Saturday.

Additional information about the PCAT and test application materials are available from colleges of pharmacy or The Psychological Corporation, 555 Academic Court, San Antonio, Texas 78204. Telephone: (210) 299-1061 or (80O) 622-3231 (7 a.m. to 7 p.m., Monday through Friday, Central time).

Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL)

The purpose of TOEFL is to evaluate the English proficiency of people whose native language is not English. Given in a single session of about 3 hours, the test consists of three sections: listening comprehension, structure and written expression, and reading comprehension. The test is given at more than 1,260 centers in 180 countries and areas and is administered by Educational Testing Service (ETS) under the general direction of a policy council established by the College Board and the Graduate Record Examinations Board.

Registration material is available from TOEFL. TOEFL, P.O. Box 6151, Princeton, New Jersey 08541-6151, USA. Telephone: (609) 771-7100.

Test of Spoken English (TSE)

The major purpose of the TSE Is to evaluate the spoken English proficiency of people whose native language is not English. The test, which takes about 30 minutes, requires examinees to demonstrate their ability to speak English by answering a variety of questions presented in printed and recorded form. All the answers to test questions are recorded on tape; no writing is required. TSE is given at selected TOEFL test centers worldwide. The test is administered by Educational Testing Service (ETS) under the general direction of a policy council established by the College Board and the Graduate Record Examinations Board.

Registration material is found In the Bulletin of Information for TOEFL and TSE available from TOEFL.

TOEFL, P.O. Box 6151, Princeton, New Jersey 08541-6151, U.S.A. Telephone: (609) 771-7100.

Veterinary College Admission Test

The VCAT is published and administered by The Psychological Corporation, a division of Harcourt Brace & Company, for applicants seeking admission to schools and colleges of veterinary medicine. The test contains sections on verbal ability, biology, chemistry, quantitative ability, and readingcomprehension.

The VCAT is offered in January, October, and November at established testing centers in the United States and Canada. Sunday testing may be arranged for applicants presenting satisfactory evidence that their religious convictions prevent their taking the examination on Saturday.

Additional Information about the VCAT and test application materials are available from colleges of veterinary medicine or The Psychological Corporation, 555 Academic Court, San Antonio, Texas 78204. Telephone: 210-299-1061 or (800) 622-3231 (7 a.m. to 7 p.m., Monday through Friday, Central time).

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