2012-13 Catalog

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Reservation-Based Community-Determined Program

The Reservation-Based Community-Determined program is “reservation-based” with classes held within the community and “community-determined” by placing value on existing community knowledge, utilizing community members as guest instructors, and instituting participatory research methods. This upper-division program serves students with 90 or more college credits with strong connections to their tribal communities.

We believe students are best served by a well-defined, consistent program that balances personal authority, indigenous knowledge and academics.

  • Personal authority challenges students to be personally accountable for their attendance, engagement and learning, and to declare the nature of their own work.
  • Indigenous knowledge honors the founding principles of the program and its commitment to involving our community’s keepers of cultural and traditional knowledge as teachers and valuable human resources.
  • Academics give breadth within the liberal arts through reading, writing, research and other scholarly pursuits that complement personal authority and community knowledge.

Our interdisciplinary curriculum is developed in collaboration with Native leaders to include the areas of community and economic development, leadership, tribal administration, sustainable environments, intergovernmental relations, indigenous knowledge, and tribal law. Students who want to develop a more specialized course of study may do so with faculty approval. Students gain a solid foundation needed to enter most areas of public service and tribal government as well graduate school and other professions.

Who Should Apply

This upper-division program serves students with 90 or more college credits with strong connections to their tribal communities. In addition to Evergreen’s application, an intake packet must be completed by all prospective RBCD students. To obtain the packet, contact Michelle Aguilar-Wells, Director.

  • Students attend class two nights per week at Muckleshoot, Nisqually, Port Gamble, Peninsula, Tulalip, or Quinault. (Makah, Lower Elwha, Port Gamble, and Skokomish are approved sites and can be reactivated contingent upon enrollment.)
  • Students attend class four Saturdays per quarter at the Longhouse on the Evergreen campus.
  • Students work toward a Bachelor of Arts degree.

For students with fewer than 90 college credits, Evergreen collaborates on The Grays Harbor College Reservation Based AA Degree Bridge program. Interested students should contact Mark Ramon at Grays Harbor College (mramon@ghc.edu or (360) 538-4090) or visit www.evergreen.edu/tribal/graysharbor.

Title OfferingStandingCreditsCreditsWhenFWSSuDescriptionPreparatoryFacultyDays of WeekMultiple StandingsStart Quarters
The Reservation Based Community Determined Program - Foundations for Sustainable Tribal Nations -- Muckleshoot

Myra Downing

Native American studies  cultural studies  government  law and government policy  leadership studies  literature  political science  sustainability studies  theater 

  ProgramJR - SRJunior - Senior1212Evening and WeekendFallWinterSpring  This program teaches course work from a Native based perspective within the context of the larger global society. Students at all reservation sites follow the same curriculum with opportunities to focus on local tribal specific issues. The overall theme provides students with a foundational knowledge base for tribal sustainability. In the broadest sense it includes: social, cultural, political, economic and environmental sustainability. At the end of the year, they will have a framework from which to explore restorative solutions and development for sustainability at the local, national and international levels. The theme for 2012-2013 is Foundations for Sustainable Tribal Nations . In fall, students will review federal Indian law through study of historical and contemporary materials and case law. They will develop a foundation for understanding treaties, the trust relationship, legal precedents, sovereignty, threats to sovereignty, and Indian activism. Study of basic conflicts over jurisdiction, land rights, domestic relations, environmental protection and other areas will provide students with insight into court systems and the political will of governments. During winter, students will study the identity formation and politics of several US presidents and world leaders through the lens of race, class, gender, nationality, education and other differences that advance or inhibit an individual's pathway to a place of privilege and power. Forms of theater will be used to study human behavior and political communication. Students will critically analyze multiple perspectives of colonization and oppression through review of American democracy and other world governmental structures. Spring quarter, students will examine the intersection of social, environmental and economic practices on the sustainability of the planet's biological systems, atmosphere and resources using a variety of methods, materials and approaches to explore contemporary sustainability issues in tribal communities, the U.S. and abroad. Students will study social/cultural and environmental justice issues. Over the program year, students from all sites meet thirteen Saturdays on campus at the Longhouse. Through case study and other methods the curriculum is enhanced and supported. Students participate in workshop-type strands and an integrated seminar that increases writing skills and broadens their exposure to the arts, social sciences, political science and natural science, and other more narrowly defined areas of study. public administration, political science, social sciences, human services, law, and tribal administration and government.Myra Downing  Fall
The Reservation Based Community Determined Program - Foundations for Sustainable Tribal Nations -- Nisqually

Cynthia Marchand-Cecil

Native American studies  cultural studies  government  law and government policy  leadership studies  literature  political science  sustainability studies  theater 

  ProgramJR - SRJunior - Senior1212Evening and WeekendFallWinterSpring  This program teaches course work from a Native based perspective within the context of the larger global society. Students at all reservation sites follow the same curriculum with opportunities to focus on local tribal specific issues. The overall theme provides students with a foundational knowledge base for tribal sustainability. In the broadest sense it includes: social, cultural, political, economic and environmental sustainability. At the end of the year, they will have a framework from which to explore restorative solutions and development for sustainability at the local, national and international levels. The theme for 2012-2013 is Foundations for Sustainable Tribal Nations . In fall, students will review federal Indian law through study of historical and contemporary materials and case law. They will develop a foundation for understanding treaties, the trust relationship, legal precedents, sovereignty, threats to sovereignty, and Indian activism. Study of basic conflicts over jurisdiction, land rights, domestic relations, environmental protection and other areas will provide students with insight into court systems and the political will of governments. During winter, students will study the identity formation and politics of several US presidents and world leaders through the lens of race, class, gender, nationality, education and other differences that advance or inhibit an individual's pathway to a place of privilege and power. Forms of theater will be used to study human behavior and political communication. Students will critically analyze multiple perspectives of colonization and oppression through review of American democracy and other world governmental structures. Spring quarter, students will examine the intersection of social, environmental and economic practices on the sustainability of the planet's biological systems, atmosphere and resources using a variety of methods, materials and approaches to explore contemporary sustainability issues in tribal communities, the U.S. and abroad. Students will study social/cultural and environmental justice issues. Over the program year, students from all sites meet thirteen Saturdays on campus at the Longhouse. Through case study and other methods the curriculum is enhanced and supported. Students participate in workshop-type strands and an integrated seminar that increases writing skills and broadens their exposure to the arts, social sciences, political science and natural science, and other more narrowly defined areas of study. public administration, political science, social sciences, human services, law, and tribal administration and government.Cynthia Marchand-Cecil  Fall
The Reservation Based Community Determined Program - Foundations for Sustainable Tribal Nations -- Peninsula

Michelle Aguilar-Wells • Chad Uran

Native American studies  cultural studies  government  law and government policy  leadership studies  literature  political science  sustainability studies  theater 

  ProgramJR - SRJunior - Senior1212Evening and WeekendFallWinterSpring  This program teaches course work from a Native based perspective within the context of the larger global society. Students at all reservation sites follow the same curriculum with opportunities to focus on local tribal specific issues. The overall theme provides students with a foundational knowledge base for tribal sustainability. In the broadest sense it includes: social, cultural, political, economic and environmental sustainability. At the end of the year, they will have a framework from which to explore restorative solutions and development for sustainability at the local, national and international levels. The theme for 2012-2013 is Foundations for Sustainable Tribal Nations. In fall, students will review federal Indian law through study of historical and contemporary materials and case law. They will develop a foundation for understanding treaties, the trust relationship, legal precedents, sovereignty, threats to sovereignty, and Indian activism. Study of basic conflicts over jurisdiction, land rights, domestic relations, environmental protection and other areas will provide students with insight into court systems and the political will of governments. During winter, students will study the identity formation and politics of several US presidents and world leaders through the lens of race, class, gender, nationality, education and other differences that advance or inhibit an individual's pathway to a place of privilege and power. Forms of theater will be used to study human behavior and political communication. Students will critically analyze multiple perspectives of colonization and oppression through review of American democracy and other world governmental structures. Spring quarter, students will examine the intersection of social, environmental and economic practices on the sustainability of the planet's biological systems, atmosphere and resources using a variety of methods, materials and approaches to explore contemporary sustainability issues in tribal communities, the U.S. and abroad. Students will study social/cultural and environmental justice issues. Over the program year, students from all sites meet thirteen Saturdays on campus at the Longhouse. Through case study and other methods the curriculum is enhanced and supported. Students participate in workshop-type strands and an integrated seminar that increases writing skills and broadens their exposure to the arts, social sciences, political science and natural science, and other more narrowly defined areas of study. public administration, political science, social sciences, human services, law, and tribal administration and government.Michelle Aguilar-Wells • Chad Uran  Fall
The Reservation Based Community Determined Program - Foundations for Sustainable Tribal Nations -- Port Gamble

Colleen Almojuela

Native American studies  cultural studies  government  law and government policy  leadership studies  literature  political science  sustainability studies  theater 

  ProgramJR - SRJunior - Senior1212Evening and WeekendFallWinterSpring  This program teaches course work from a Native based perspective within the context of the larger global society. Students at all reservation sites follow the same curriculum with opportunities to focus on local tribal specific issues. The overall theme provides students with a foundational knowledge base for tribal sustainability. In the broadest sense it includes: social, cultural, political, economic and environmental sustainability. At the end of the year, they will have a framework from which to explore restorative solutions and development for sustainability at the local, national and international levels. The theme for 2012-2013 is Foundations for Sustainable Tribal Nations. In fall, students will review federal Indian law through study of historical and contemporary materials and case law. They will develop a foundation for understanding treaties, the trust relationship, legal precedents, sovereignty, threats to sovereignty, and Indian activism. Study of basic conflicts over jurisdiction, land rights, domestic relations, environmental protection and other areas will provide students with insight into court systems and the political will of governments. During winter, students will study the identity formation and politics of several US presidents and world leaders through the lens of race, class, gender, nationality, education and other differences that advance or inhibit an individual's pathway to a place of privilege and power. Forms of theater will be used to study human behavior and political communication. Students will critically analyze multiple perspectives of colonization and oppression through review of American democracy and other world governmental structures. Spring quarter, students will examine the intersection of social, environmental and economic practices on the sustainability of the planet's biological systems, atmosphere and resources using a variety of methods, materials and approaches to explore contemporary sustainability issues in tribal communities, the U.S. and abroad. Students will study social/cultural and environmental justice issues. Over the program year, students from all sites meet thirteen Saturdays on campus at the Longhouse. Through case study and other methods the curriculum is enhanced and supported. Students participate in workshop-type strands and an integrated seminar that increases writing skills and broadens their exposure to the arts, social sciences, political science and natural science, and other more narrowly defined areas of study. public administration, political science, social sciences, human services, law, and tribal administration and government. Colleen Almojuela  Fall
The Reservation Based Community Determined Program - Foundations for Sustainable Tribal Nations -- Quinault

Dorothy Flaherty

Native American studies  cultural studies  government  law and government policy  leadership studies  literature  political science  sustainability studies  theater 

  ProgramJR - SRJunior - Senior1212Evening and WeekendFallWinterSpring  This program teaches course work from a Native based perspective within the context of the larger global society. Students at all reservation sites follow the same curriculum with opportunities to focus on local tribal specific issues. The overall theme provides students with a foundational knowledge base for tribal sustainability. In the broadest sense it includes: social, cultural, political, economic and environmental sustainability. At the end of the year, they will have a framework from which to explore restorative solutions and development for sustainability at the local, national and international levels. The theme for 2012-2013 is Foundations for Sustainable Tribal Nations . In fall, students will review federal Indian law through study of historical and contemporary materials and case law. They will develop a foundation for understanding treaties, the trust relationship, legal precedents, sovereignty, threats to sovereignty, and Indian activism. Study of basic conflicts over jurisdiction, land rights, domestic relations, environmental protection and other areas will provide students with insight into court systems and the political will of governments. During winter, students will study the identity formation and politics of several US presidents and world leaders through the lens of race, class, gender, nationality, education and other differences that advance or inhibit an individual's pathway to a place of privilege and power. Forms of theater will be used to study human behavior and political communication. Students will critically analyze multiple perspectives of colonization and oppression through review of American democracy and other world governmental structures. Spring quarter, students will examine the intersection of social, environmental and economic practices on the sustainability of the planet's biological systems, atmosphere and resources using a variety of methods, materials and approaches to explore contemporary sustainability issues in tribal communities, the U.S. and abroad. Students will study social/cultural and environmental justice issues. Over the program year, students from all sites meet thirteen Saturdays on campus at the Longhouse. Through case study and other methods the curriculum is enhanced and supported. Students participate in workshop-type strands and an integrated seminar that increases writing skills and broadens their exposure to the arts, social sciences, political science and natural science, and other more narrowly defined areas of study. public administration, political science, social sciences, human services, law, and tribal administration and government.Dorothy Flaherty  Fall
The Reservation Based Community Determined Program - Foundations for Sustainable Tribal Nations -- Tulalip

Renee Swan-Waite

Native American studies  cultural studies  government  law and government policy  leadership studies  literature  political science  sustainability studies  theater 

  ProgramJR - SRJunior - Senior1212Evening and WeekendFallWinterSpring  This program teaches course work from a Native based perspective within the context of the larger global society. Students at all reservation sites follow the same curriculum with opportunities to focus on local tribal specific issues. The overall theme provides students with a foundational knowledge base for tribal sustainability. In the broadest sense it includes: social, cultural, political, economic and environmental sustainability. At the end of the year, they will have a framework from which to explore restorative solutions and development for sustainability at the local, national and international levels. The theme for 2012-2013 is Foundations for Sustainable Tribal Nations . In fall, students will review federal Indian law through study of historical and contemporary materials and case law. They will develop a foundation for understanding treaties, the trust relationship, legal precedents, sovereignty, threats to sovereignty, and Indian activism. Study of basic conflicts over jurisdiction, land rights, domestic relations, environmental protection and other areas will provide students with insight into court systems and the political will of governments. During winter, students will study the identity formation and politics of several US presidents and world leaders through the lens of race, class, gender, nationality, education and other differences that advance or inhibit an individual's pathway to a place of privilege and power. Forms of theater will be used to study human behavior and political communication. Students will critically analyze multiple perspectives of colonization and oppression through review of American democracy and other world governmental structures. Spring quarter, students will examine the intersection of social, environmental and economic practices on the sustainability of the planet's biological systems, atmosphere and resources using a variety of methods, materials and approaches to explore contemporary sustainability issues in tribal communities, the U.S. and abroad. Students will study social/cultural and environmental justice issues. Over the program year, students from all sites meet thirteen Saturdays on campus at the Longhouse. Through case study and other methods the curriculum is enhanced and supported. Students participate in workshop-type strands and an integrated seminar that increases writing skills and broadens their exposure to the arts, social sciences, political science and natural science, and other more narrowly defined areas of study. public administration, political science, social sciences, human services, law, and tribal administration and government.Renee Swan-Waite  Fall