2013-14 Catalog

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2013-14 Undergraduate Index A-Z

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American Studies [clear]


Title   Offering Standing Credits Credits When F W S Su Description Preparatory Faculty Days Multiple Standings Start Quarters Open Quarters
Kabby Mitchell and Joye Hardiman
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring How did Black men and women, of many different cultures and ages, succeed against all odds? How did they move from victim to victors? Where did they find the insurmountable courage to deconstruct and reconstruct their lives? In this program, students will participate in an inquiry-base exploration of the efficacy, resiliency and longevity of the lives and legacies of selected Black men and women from Ancient Egypt to contemporary times. Our exploration will use the lenses of Ancient Egyptian studies, African, African-American and Afro-Disaporic history, dance history, media and popular culture to investigate the lives of these men and women lives, their historical, cultural and spiritual contexts and legacies.The class will have a variety of learning environments, including lectures and films, workshops, seminars and research groups. All students will demonstrate their acquired knowledge, skills and insights about the mis-education/re-education process through a quarter -long reflective journal project , a mid -quarter contextual research project;  and an end-of-the-quarter final paper and a collaborative performance about the journey from mis-education to education and those factors that allow one to retain their humanity in spite of horrific dehumanizing attempts. Kabby Mitchell Joye Hardiman Tue Tue Tue Wed Wed Wed Thu Thu Thu Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Stephanie Coontz
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Weekend S 14Spring This program explores changes in the social construction and cultural expectations of family life and intimate relations, from colonial times to the present. We begin by delving into the very different values and behaviors of colonial families and then trace changes in love, marriage, parenting, and family arrangements under the influence of the American Revolution and the spread of wage labor. We study the gender and sexual norms of the 19th century, including variation by race and class, then examine the changes pioneered in the early 20th century. We discuss the rise of the 1950s male breadwinner family and then follow its demise from the 1960s through the 1980s. We end the quarter by discussing new patterns of partnering and parenting in the past 30 years,Readings will be challenging, and there will be frequent writing assignments. All students are expected to complete all assignments and participate in workshops and seminar discussions. Credit depends upon consistent attendance and preparation and a demonstrated mastery of the subject matter.This class is excellent preparation for graduate work or professional employment in history, sociology, law, American studies, social work, and psychology. It provides needed context and background for people working in the social services or education. sociology, history, family studies, research, social work, teaching, family law and counseling. Stephanie Coontz Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Zoltan Grossman and Kristina Ackley
Signature Required: Winter 
  Program FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter Students will explore the juxtaposed themes of Frontier and Homeland, Empire and Periphery and the Indigenous and Immigrant experience. We will use historical analysis (changes in time) and geographic analysis (changes in place) to critique these themes, and will turn toward cultural analysis for a deeper understanding of race, nation, class and gender. We will take as our starting point a critique of Frederick Jackson Turner’s “Frontier Thesis”—that the frontier is "the meeting point between savagery and civilization"—as a racist rationale for the colonization of Native American homelands. We will consider alternative histories of Anglo-American expansion and settlement in North America, with interaction, change, and persistence as our unifying themes.We will study how place and connection is nurtured, re-imagined and interpreted, particularly in Indigenous and recent immigrant communities. We will connect between the ongoing process of "Manifest Destiny" in North America and subsequent overseas imperial expansion into Latin America, the Pacific and beyond. The colonial control of domestic homelands and imperial control of foreign homelands are both highlighted in recent patterns of recent immigration. These patterns involve many "immigrants" who are in fact indigenous to the Americas, as well as immigrants from countries once conquered by the U.S. military. The American Empire, it seems, began at home and its effects are coming back home and will be contested again.In fall quarter, we will track the historical progression of the frontier across North America and overseas and the territorial and cultural clashes of immigrant and colonized peoples. We will hear firsthand the life stories of local individuals and communities to understand their narratives of conflict, assimilation, resistance and survival. In the winter quarter, we will look at contemporary case studies that show the imprint of the past in the present and how 21st-century North American communities (particularly in the Pacific Northwest) are wrestling with the legacies of colonization, imperialism and migration. In particular, we will examine the overlapping experiences of Native Americans and recent immigrants, and Indigenous territories and migrations that transgress or straddle the international border as defined by "Homeland Security. This program offers ideal opportunities for students to develop skills in writing, research, and analysis. Zoltan Grossman Kristina Ackley Tue Wed Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Fall Fall Winter
Kristina Ackley and Zoltan Grossman
  Program FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day S 14Spring Students will explore the juxtaposed themes of Frontier and Homeland, Empire and Periphery and the Indigenous and Immigrant experience. We will use historical analysis (changes in time) and geographic analysis (changes in place) to critique these themes, and will turn toward cultural analysis for a deeper understanding of race, nation, class and gender. We will take as our starting point a critique of Frederick Jackson Turner’s “Frontier Thesis”—that the frontier is "the meeting point between savagery and civilization"—as a racist rationale for the colonization of Native American homelands. We will consider alternative histories of Anglo-American expansion and settlement in North America, with interaction, change, and persistence as our unifying themes.We will study how place and connection is nurtured, re-imagined and interpreted, particularly in Indigenous and recent immigrant communities. We will connect between the ongoing process of "Manifest Destiny" in North America and subsequent overseas imperial expansion into Latin America, the Pacific and beyond. The colonial control of domestic homelands and imperial control of foreign homelands are both highlighted in recent patterns of recent immigration. These patterns involve many "immigrants" who are in fact indigenous to the Americas, as well as immigrants from countries once conquered by the U.S. military. The American Empire, it seems, began at home and its effects are coming back home and will be contested again.We will track the historical progression of the frontier across North America and overseas and the territorial and cultural clashes of immigrant and colonized peoples. We will hear firsthand the life stories of local individuals and communities to understand their narratives of conflict, assimilation, resistance and survival. In particular, we will examine the overlapping experiences of Native Americans and recent immigrants, and Indigenous territories and migrations that transgress or straddle the international border as defined by Homeland Security. This program offers ideal opportunities for students to develop foundational skills in writing, research, and analysis. Kristina Ackley Zoltan Grossman Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Spring Spring
Chico Herbison and Frances V. Rains
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall “The rain feels heavy/on the gray sidewalks of America.” —James Masao Mitsui, Japanese American poet of the Pacific Northwest Embedded among the bricks of the Japanese American Historical Plaza—part of a picturesque waterfront park in Portland, Oregon—are thirteen granite and basalt stones. Engraved on those “story stones” are poems that, in harmony with the overall design of the plaza itself, help illuminate the tragedies and triumphs of Japanese in Oregon. Along with their counterparts in Washington State, communities of Oregon Nikkei (Japanese emigrants and their descendants, including “war brides” and a “mixed-race” population) have helped define—historically, culturally, and in other ways—the Pacific Northwest. Yet, their story is not well known, either nationally or here in this place of “rain and gray sidewalks.”This program will explore the rich, but still frequently overlooked, history and culture of Nikkei, from their first arrival in this country, through the traumatic events of the World War II period, and beyond. Although we will examine the overall experience of Nikkei in the United States, our particular focus will be on those in the Pacific Northwest. Accompanying us on our interdisciplinary journey will be historical studies, oral testimony, fiction and poetry, photographs and film, and music, among other texts and tools. We will immerse ourselves in topics such as the earliest Japanese immigration; the 19th- and 20th-century struggles against discrimination and exclusion; the World War II internment experience (including an examination of the resistance movement in the internment camps, and the legendary exploits of Nikkei soldiers in both theaters of the war); the post-war efforts by Nikkei to reassemble their lives and, for some, to seek redress and reparations; the saga of Japanese “war brides” (women who married U.S. servicemen in Occupied Japan and eventually migrated stateside); and the world of “mixed-race” Nikkei.Each student will read a series of seminar books and articles related to program topics and themes; participate in weekly seminars and write weekly seminar papers; participate in workshops; and screen and critically analyze films. In addition, there will be field trips to Pacific Northwest locations with Nikkei historical and cultural connections. Finally, students will complete substantial, individual research projects and make summative presentations of their work. This program was formerly entitled Nikkei in the Pacific Northwest: "We carry strength, dignity and soul." Chico Herbison Frances V. Rains Mon Mon Wed Thu Thu Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Chico Herbison
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day W 14Winter —Blue Scholars, Seattle hip-hop duo (from “Evening Chai”) From Bruce Lee to Harold & Kumar, henna to hip-hop, bulgogi to pho, manga to , Asians and Asian Americans have left an indelible imprint on U.S. popular culture. As eloquently noted by Mimi Thi Nguyen and Thuy Linh Nguyen Tu, “[f]ew of us are immune to popular culture’s intimate address or to its pleasures and affirmations, frustrations and denials” ( ). It is, indeed, that lack of immunity and a restless hunger to understand those “pleasures, affirmations, frustrations, and denials” that will sustain us on our 10-week journey. We will begin the quarter with two fundamental questions—“What is an Asian American?” and “What is popular culture?"—that will lead us to (1) an exploration of the major historical, cultural, social, and political contours of the Asian American experience, and (2) an immersion in critical theoretical perspectives on culture in general, and popular culture in particular. We will devote the remainder of the quarter to an examination of the complex, and frequently vexed, ways in which Asians and Asian Americans have been represented in U.S. popular culture and, more importantly, how members of those communities have become active of popular culture. Our approach, throughout the quarter, will be interdisciplinary, multilayered, and transgressive in its insistence on an intertextuality that moves beyond the commonly interrogated categories of race, gender, and class. Students will read selected fiction, poetry, comics and graphic novels, scholarly articles, and other written texts. There will be weekly screenings and analysis of documentaries and a range of fiction films, such as martial arts films and anime. We will also explore Asian American popular culture in music, photography and other visual art, bodies, and cuisine. Students will participate in weekly seminars and workshops, submit short weekly writing assignments, and produce a final project that will help them refine both their expository and creative nonfiction writing skills. Field trips may include visits to Pacific Northwest locations with Asian/Pacific Islander historical and cultural connections, and to off-campus film, music, and other venues.   Chico Herbison Tue Tue Thu Thu Fri Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Karen Gaul, Rita Pougiales and Julie Russo
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8, 16 08 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring In , the historian William Leach writes, “Whoever has the power to project a vision of the good life and make it prevail has the most decisive power of all.” Since the early 20th century, the pleasures of consumption have dominated prevailing visions of the good life in the United States. Innovations in mass production and mass media went hand in hand to link pleasure and prosperity with acquiring the latest commodities. Leisure has also been central to those pleasures, often in the form of tourism, fashion and entertainment, as people consume not only goods but experiences and ideas about what it means to be successful and happy. This program is an inquiry into these features of American consumer culture, particularly the values of convenience and authenticity that characterize the objects and desires it produces and exchanges.Students in this program will study the history and logic of U.S. consumer culture. We will consider the forces that have shaped each of us into consumers in this capitalist society, from representation and ideology to material and technological development. Sustainability will be a critical lens for our inquiry, as we consider the raw materials, labor and waste streams inherent in goods and in cultural experiences. Life cycle analysis of objects—from their origins in nature to their presence on retail shelves, personal spaces, garbage bins and landfills—will help us build a broader context for understanding the materiality with which we all engage every day.Our historical arc will be sweeping: from hunter-gatherers nearly two million years ago, to the origins of animal and plant domestication, to the formation of colonial settlements which created unprecedented challenges and opportunities, to the modern era. We will explore the patterns of resource use, social inequality and relative sustainability. We will examine how habits of conservation, thrift and re-use that were endemic to pre-modern societies transformed in tandem with the unprecedented energies of industrialization. We will investigate the theory and economics of post-industrial capitalism to better understand the impact of new media and technologies on the ways we produce and consume in the present day. We will also examine how curiosity about foreign and mysterious cultures in the context of globalization paved the way for tourism in which cultural authenticity is a central attraction. We will study the relationship between consumption and sustainability, pursuit of the good life through self-help and imported cultural practices such as yoga and meditation, between entertainment industries and communication networks, advertising and buying habits, spending money and self-worth. These contexts will enable us to destabilize and interrogate notions of what feels "normal" in the ways we engage as consumers today, including as consumers of knowledge in increasingly digitized institutions of higher education.Students will have the opportunity to examine ingrained routines of daily life, become conscious of the origins and meanings of their own habits and desires, and thereby become critical thinkers and actors in consumer culture. Our activities will include reading, writing papers and participating in seminar discussions on program topics, learning ethnographic research methods, experimenting with multimodal and collaborative work, viewing relevant films and participating in field trips. In fall quarter, we will build foundational skills and introduce key concepts and themes; winter quarter students will begin to develop their own research agenda; and in spring quarter, they can apply theory to practice in research and/or community-based projects. Spring quarter readings emphasize responses to consumer culture through alternative practices and collectives. Texts on on intentional communities include by Juliet Schor, by Karen Litfin, , and . Texts on virtual communities include by Fred Turner, by Lawrence Lessig, and selections from the anthology Digital Labor. These and related topics comprise an 8 credit academic block taught on Tuesdays and Wednesdays. Students enrolling for 16 credits should be prepared to engage in substantial independent learning or work in the community (faculty can structure or guide this piece for new students). One option is a media production intensive that includes a series of technical workshops and a collaborative project. Program learning activities include: seminar responses and essay assignments, field trips, digital media workshops, yoga and awareness practices. Field trips may include Procession of the Species, visits to Fertile Ground, NW Ecobuilders Guild, the Arbutus School, and intentional communities in the PNW, and/or a tour of tiny homes. Karen Gaul Rita Pougiales Julie Russo Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Susan Preciso and Mark Harrison
Signature Required: Winter 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 8, 12 08 12 Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring What is culture and how does it inform our understanding and interpretation of history?  As we explore this question, students will study works of fiction, film, visual art and history to determine how our culture shapes our ideas about past and present realities.  Each quarter students will incorporate quantitative methods to enrich and explain aspects of American culture.  We’ll look at cultural products, from high art to popular culture with a particular focus on film and literature, to see how they reflect and shape our ideas about who and what we are. Our study will be organized around three turbulent decades in American history.During Fall Quarter, we considered the post-Civil War years, including Reconstruction and western expansion.  From dime novels to Hollywood westerns, we examined how deeply we are shaped by 19 and 20 century frontier ideology.  Money and technology—capitalism and the railroads—also drove westward migration.  We analyzed the tensions around race and class as they figure in film, novels, and popular culture.Winter quarter, we will move to the 1930s.  How did the Great Depression and the policy created to deal with that crisis change the way we see government?  What was the impact of two great migrations—from the dust bowl states to the West, and from the agricultural South to the industrial north—on American society?  In such a time of hardship and deprivation, how did the Golden Age of Hollywood reflect our cultural realities through genre films, such as the screwball comedy, the musical, and the gangster film?In the spring, we’ll focus on the 1950s and ‘60s and how upward—and outward—mobility informed who and where we are today.  The Civil Rights Movement and the Vietnam War transformed the country.  Cars, freeways, and the rise of the suburbs re-shaped the cultural landscape, and television expanded the scope of mass media and popular culture.Our work will include critical reading of books and films. Students will be expected to learn about schools of cultural criticism, using different approaches to enrich their analyses. They will be expected to participate in seminar, lectures, workshops, and library research and to attend field trips to local museums and live theater performances.The thread of mathematics runs through the tapestry of everything we’ll study in Culture as History.  Often times, in a non-math/science interdisciplinary program, even though the threads are there, they are never seen but lay hidden.  In Culture as History, we’ll work to pull some of these threads forward – to brighten the image and sharpen the focus of the topics we’ll study.  The mathematical threads that we choose to pull forward will be carefully chosen to gently enhance the image. Through collaborative learning, the mathematical topics we’ll engage with include quantitative literacy (reading and interpreting information), graph theory (How far is it to New York?), and other topics as appropriate.  Susan Preciso Mark Harrison Mon Wed Sat Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Peter Bohmer
  Program FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day S 14Spring The outcome of current social and economic problems will shape the future for us all. This program focuses on analyzing these problems and developing skills to contribute to debates and effective action in the public sphere. We will address major contemporary issues such as national and global poverty and economic inequality, immigration, incarceration, climate change, and war. U.S. economic and social problems will be placed in a global context. We will draw on sociology, political science, economics and political economy for our analysis, with particular attention to dimensions of class, race, gender, and global inequalities.We will analyze the mainstream and alternative media coverage of current issues and of the social movements dealing with them. We will build our analyses using data-driven descriptions, narratives of those directly affected, and theories that place issues in larger social and historical contexts. Students will be introduced to competing theoretical frameworks for explaining the causes of social problems and their potential solutions (frameworks such as neoclassical economics, liberalism, Marxism, feminism, and anarchism). We will study how social movements have actively addressed the problems and investigate their short- and long-term proposals and solutions as well as how they would be addressed in alternative economic and social systems.We will choose the specific issues to be investigated in the program as spring 2014 approaches, so that our study will be as relevant as possible. For each topic examined, we will combine readings with lectures, films, and workshops, along with guest speakers and possible field trips as appropriate to observe problems and responses first hand.Students will write short papers on each of the social problems we analyze. In addition, you will study in more depth and report on one of the economic or social issues we are studying. Peter Bohmer Tue Wed Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Spring Spring
John Filmer
Signature Required: Winter 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring How are organizations managed? What skills and abilities are needed? Organizations, fail or succeed according to their ability to adapt to fluid legal, cultural, political and economic realities. The management of organizations will play a seminal role in this program, where the primary focus will be on business and economic development. Management is a highly interdisciplinary profession where generalized, connected knowledge  plays a critical role. Knowledge of the liberal arts/humanities or of technological advances may be as vital as skill development in finance, law, organizational dynamics or the latest management theory. An effective leader/manager must have the ability to read, comprehend, contextualize and interpret the flow of events impacting the organization. Communication skills, critical reasoning, quantitative (financial) analysis and the ability to research, sort out, comprehend and digest voluminous amounts of material characterize the far-thinking and effective organizational leader/manager.This program will explore the essentials of for-profit and non-profit business development through the study of classical economics, free market principles, economic development and basic business principles. Selected seminar readings will trace the evolution of free market thinking in our own Democratic Republic.  Critical reasoning will be a significant focus in order to explicate certain economic principles and their application to the business environment. You will be introduced to the tools, skills and concepts you need to develop strategies for navigating your organization in an ever-changing environment. Class work will include lectures, book seminars, projects, case studies, leadership, team building and financial analysis. Expect to read a lot, study hard and be challenged to think clearly, logically and often. Texts will include by Thomas Zimmerer by Thomas Sowell, by M. Neil Browne and Stuart Keeley, and by John A. Tracy. A stout list of seminar books will include , by Hayek, by Thomas Paine and by DeToqueville. In fall quarter, we will establish a foundation in economics, business, critical reasoning and the history of business development in the United StatesWinter quarter will emphasize real life economic circumstances impacting organizations. You will engage in discussions with practitioners in businesses and various other private sector and government organizations. You will be actively involved in research and project work with some of these organizations and it will provide an opportunity to investigate and design exciting internships for the spring quarter.In spring quarter, the emphasis will be on individual projects or internships. Continuing students will design their own curriculum. This will require students to take full responsibility for their learning, including a bibliography, the design of the syllabus, and learning schedule. The faculty sponsor merely acts as an educational manager and not as a tutor. In-program internships provide a different opportunity to apply prior learning but in this case, with the intent of developing applied skills and people skills rather than focusing solely on advanced study or research.  John Filmer Mon Wed Fri Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Artee Young
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 12 12 Day Su 14Summer Full The goal of this program is to equip  students with knowledge and understanding of national and state governmental institutions  and how they function in order to serve the people . The objective is achieved through extensive exploration into  theoretical and pragmatic knowledge about how democratic systems work. This program offers an opportunity to engage in an intense collaborative exercise in  participatory governance in order to know  how the multiple layers of government in our state and nation continue to evolve as the nation expands.   To this end, we will delve deeply to learn how government  has worked from its inception to the present.   Participatory governance is based not only on knowledge about how government works, but also on voting patterns and vote-counts; thus, this program seeks to interrogate issues, legislation and proposed laws that obstruct citizens’ access to the right to vote.  We will also investigate the causes and effects of declining citizen interest  in voting, a factor that critically erodes the ideal of government of, by and for the people.   We will also examine the roles of “the people” in this evolving democracy  through texts, journal articles, governmental websites, significant court cases,  films, lecture, guest speakers and student oral presentations.  The approach to this body of information focuses on the content and processes by which the people acquire information and engage officials in national and state branches of government.  Themes include, but are not limited to, federalism, states' rights, and citizens' participatory governance and rights.  Students will also visit the Washington State Capitol and legislative offices,  the Washington State Archives  as well as the Temple of Justice  Artee Young Mon Wed Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Cheri Lucas-Jennings
Signature Required: Fall 
  Contract SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day and Evening F 13 Fall Individual studies offers important opportunities for advanced students to create their own course of study and research. Prior to the beginning of the quarter, interested individuals or small groups of students must consult with the faculty sponsor to develop an outline of proposed projects to be described in an Individual Learning Contract. If students wish to gain internship experience they must secure the agreement and signature of a field supervisor prior to the initiation of the internship contract.This faculty welcomes internships and contracts in the areas of the arts (including acrylic and oil painting, sculpture, or textiles); water policy and hydrolic systems; environmental health; health policy; public law; cultural studies; ethnic studies; permaculture, economics of agriculture; toxins and brownfields; community planning, intranational relations.This opportunity is open to those who wish to continue with applied projects that seek to create social change in our community; artists engaged in creative projects and those begining internship work at the State capitol who seek to expand their experience to public agencies and non-profit institutions; and to those interested in the study of low income populations and legal aid.  Cheri Lucas-Jennings Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Julianne Unsel and Artee Young
Signature Required: Winter  Spring 
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring As currently measured by the United Nations' Human Development Index, the United States has one of the highest standards of living in the world. Average life expectancies, educational levels, and annual incomes place even poor Americans among the most privileged people on earth. Even so, there are gross inequalities inside the U.S. Factors of personal identity, including race, class, and gender, predict with uncanny precision the range of life choices available to any given individual. The U.S. has the highest incarceration rate in the world. Cities are rife with violence, the political system is polarized and corrupt, and personal lives of rich and poor are marked by addiction, excess, apathy, and want. This program questions how this has happened: How do the personal identities and everyday lives of a people come together to shape social, economic, and political conditions in a nation like the United States? How do such conditions, in turn, shape individual identities and lives? What institutions have framed and enforced these conditions over time? What institutions currently sustain them? How do diverse Americans understand and react to these conditions? What can we do to make things better now?  To find answers, we will focus on two institutions fundamental to personal identity and social control in the American present and past – law and commerce. We will examine how property law and the criminal justice system in particular have shaped American history, how history has shaped them, and how both have managed personal identities through social control.In fall quarter, we will study the diverse array of social, economic, and political relationships that developed in the U.S. from settlement to the end of slavery. In winter, we will examine changes in relationships from the closing of the western frontier through the present. In spring, we will place our own lives in proximate context with exploration of contemporary theories of personal identity and social control. In all quarters, we will make a visual study of "the outlaw" as a trope both romanticized and reviled in American folklore and popular culture. We will also place U.S. economic development into a general global context. Interdisciplinary readings will include legal studies, legal history, social and economic history, critical race studies, visual studies, and feminist theory. Classes will include discussion seminars, writing workshops, lectures, student panel presentations, library study periods, and occasional film screenings.Program assignments will help us grow in the art and craft of clear communication and well-supported argumentation. They will include critical reading, academic writing, research in peer-reviewed literature, and public outreach and speaking. A digital photography component will explore "the outlaw" through visual expression. In spring, internship opportunities and individualized learning plans will bring program themes to social outreach agencies and groups in our local community.This program will offer appropriate support to all students ready to do advanced work. Activities will support student peer-to-peer teaching, personal responsibility for learning and achievement, contemplative study habits, and intensive skills development. Transfer students are welcome. Julianne Unsel Artee Young Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Matthew Smith
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring Today as we move into the second decade of the 21 century, environmental issues are in the mainstream. Concerns about the environment have compelled us to rethink everything from the food we eat to climate change, from the philosophy of the nature to the nature of our communities, from economic policy to our understanding of earth and human history. This program provides an opportunity for students to read and respond to some of the best new environmental writing and ideas in the context of classic texts in the field. We will trace the origins of nature writing, the twin traditions of exploration and romanticism as they emerge and develop in the early 19 and early 20 century. Texts including H.D. Thoreau's ; R.W. Emerson's ; John Muir's and Aldo Leopold's A will form the background for our reading of contemporary nature writing and environmental thinking. We will read contemporary works including Timothy Morton's Gary Snyder's ; John Vaillent's ; Ann Coplin's ; Marc Fiege's ; and other articles, poems and essays.We will read and discuss each text carefully. We will maintain a reader’s journal in which we reflect upon the text and themes that have emerged in our reading. Students will be expected to write short formal essays, an extended piece of nature writing, and a research essay dealing with a particular topic, writer, or theme that arises from our work. Each student should anticipate becoming the resident expert in the work of at least one of our authors or one major issue.The program is designed to give students an opportunity to read a variety of important pieces of environmental literature and to work on their own writing. We will share our writing with peer and faculty support and all students will be expected to participate regularly in all phases of the program. Our work will offer opportunities for serious conversation, focused research, and reflection on personal and collective understandings of environmental ethics and action. Matthew Smith Wed Thu Thu Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Anthony Zaragoza
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su 14Summer Session II Anthony Zaragoza Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Anthony Zaragoza and Savvina Chowdhury
  Program FR ONLYFreshmen Only 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Political economy asks basic but often overlooked questions: who has what, who does what work, why, how it got to be that way and how to change it. Given this starting point, what do some of the most basic and everyday things around us look like through the lens of political economy? How could we better understand our food system, popular culture and social movements using this interdisciplinary set of questions and perspectives? For example, we'll look at how apples are grown and harvested, , and what's grown out of the Occupy Movement, each as its own window into the way the economic system we were born into works, and how people just like us are responding to it and trying to remake the world. Through these explorations of food systems, popular culture and social movements, we will get a better understanding of the ways in which society itself becomes hierarchical and divided by race, class, gender and sexuality. In fall quarter, our guiding question will ask how capitalism evolved and came to be the way it is. How did relationships based on food, popular culture and social movements influence and become influenced by the emergence, development and concrete workings of U.S. political economy in the 20 century? In tandem with the evolution of the capitalist system, we will examine competing historical visions of political economy put forth by indigenous struggles, immigrant struggles, anti-slavery struggles, the feminist movement, the labor movement. At the same time, we will emphasize the lives of exploited and marginalized people as they encountered capitalism as an economic system. Through this work we will work to become better readers of our texts and of the world. In winter quarter, we will examine the interrelationship between the U.S. political economy and the changing global system, as well as U.S. foreign policy. We will study the causes and consequences of the globalization of capital and its effects on our daily lives, international migration, the role of multilateral institutions and the meaning of various trade agreements and regional organizations and alliances. We will look at the impact of the global order on our food system and explore the politics of culture, as people negotiate and contest new emerging regimes of labor, property and citizenship. Through protests, revolutions and riots, social movements continue to raise core questions regarding democracy, power, equality and the relationship between citizens, the state and the global economy, providing fruitful alternative analytical perspectives for the study of capitalist globalization and transnational networks. This quarter's work will allow us to deepen and strengthen our analytical skills.In spring, we will focus our efforts to learn from diverse, community-based institutions that offer us alternative visions of how to organize social and economic activity, in accordance with the basic principles of human rights, ethical labor practices and cooperative work and decision-making, through processes that respect the integrity of our environment and ecology. Working in conjunction with Evergreen's Center for Community-Based Learning and Action, schools, advocacy groups, veteran's rights groups and other nonprofit organizations, students are invited to examine strategies put forward by popular education models, immigrant rights advocates, gay/lesbian/transgender advocates and community-based economic models. In our last quarter, we will work to further develop our communication skills, organization and accountability. Anthony Zaragoza Savvina Chowdhury Freshmen FR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Gail Wootan
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening Su 14Summer Session II This course will examine the historical, cultural, and social reasons why women, despite their majority in many other sectors of life, are not filling leadership positions in the United States.  We will also identify solutions that exist for individuals and groups, and what has been done historically and presently to improve the path to leadership for women.  This course will primarily focus on US-related issues, but will also briefly study other countries and their struggles and successes in increasing gender diversity in leadership positions.  Students will learn through course readings, research projects, group activities, videos, seminars, presentations, guest lecturers, and personal reflection.   Gail Wootan Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
John McNamara
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening Su 14Summer Session II John McNamara Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer