2013-14 Catalog

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2013-14 Undergraduate Index A-Z

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Biology [clear]


Title   Offering Standing Credits Credits When F W S Su Description Preparatory Faculty Days Multiple Standings Start Quarters Open Quarters
Andrea Gullickson and Bret Weinstein
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring Humans are unique products of adaptive evolution. Our most remarkable evolutionary features are associated with our overwhelmingly cultural brains, far more flexible and dynamic than the brains of any other creature on earth. But this level of uniqueness creates a problem in the quest to understand ourselves. How are we to comprehend human characteristics that have no parallel, and little precedent, elsewhere in the biota?Of all the unique cultural attributes of humans, music is uniquely perplexing. It exists in every culture, is a significant feature of nearly every human life. Music is produced by both males and females. It can be made with tools as elaborate as a piano, or as sparingly as with a single human voice. It is both collaborative and solitary. It can be enjoyed as a participant or spectator. And music is powerful—reaching into our deepest emotional core where it has the capacity to trigger profound responses, often with zero associated narrative content.This program will confront this deepest evolutionary mystery full force, and on its own terms. We will cultivate an appreciation and comprehension of the structure, meaning and effect of music as we address the evolutionary mechanisms that must have produced it. We will strive as a learning community to experience music’s full glory and mystery, while we grapple rigorously with it as an evolutionary phenomenon. Weekly program activities will include reading, focused listening, workshops, lectures and seminars. Together we will approach program content in a manner that is accessible to students with little background in these areas, while still challenging those with prior experience.  Andrea Gullickson Bret Weinstein Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Heather Heying
Signature Required: Winter 
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day W 14Winter S 14Spring What do animals do, how do they do it and why? In this two-quarter-long investigation of animal behavior, a continuation of Genes and Evolution in fall quarter, students will answer these questions through extensive use of the scientific literature, in-depth discussions of the evolutionary and ecological theories fundamental to the study of behavior, independent research projects and several weeks in the field, including a multi-week trip to tropical ecosystems in Ecuador.Animals hibernate, forage, mate, form social groups, compete, communicate, care for their young and so much more. They do so with the tools of their physiology, anatomy, and, in some cases, culture, for reasons having to do with their particular ecology and evolutionary history. In this program, we will begin with a review of animal diversity, and continue our studies of behavior from both a theoretical and an empirical perspective. Students will be expected to engage some of the complex and often contradictory scientific predictions and results that have been generated in this field through lectures, workshops and take-home exams, as well as undertake their own, intensive field research. Some topics covered in this program will include mating systems, territoriality, female mate choice, competition, communication, parental care, game theory, plant/animal interactions and convergent evolution. Several readings will focus on one group of animals in particular: the primates, including  Continuing the focus on theory and statistics begun in Genes and Evolution, we will travel to Ecuador to study the differences and similarities between the neotropics and the Pacific Northwest, focusing on the animals and their behavior. Particular attention will be paid to the herpetofauna (amphibians and reptiles) that live in lowland rainforests. In spring quarter, having studied the methods, statistics and literature frequently used in behavioral research, students will generate their own hypotheses and go into the field to test them through extensive, independent field research. This work might be in Ecuador or the Pacific Northwest. Students will return to campus for the last two weeks of spring quarter to complete their data analysis and present their research.  Heather Heying Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Michael Paros
Signature Required: Winter 
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day W 14Winter Why do humans keep pets and at the same time raise animals for food? What are the psychological and moral complexities that characterize our relationships with animals? What is the impact of human–animal interactions on the health and well-being of people and animals? How do we assess the relative welfare of animals under a variety of circumstances? Anthrozoology is the interdisciplinary study of human (anthro) and animal (zoo) interaction. This topic of inquiry will be used to study general biology, zoology, anthropology and philosophy. Through field trips, guest speakers, reading, writing and discussion, students will become familiar with the multiple and often paradoxical ways we relate to companion animals, animals for sport, zoo animals, wildlife, research animals and food animals. We will use our collective experiences, along with science-based and value-based approaches, to critically examine the ever-changing role of animals in society.We will begin the quarter by focusing on the process of animal domestication in different cultures from an evolutionary and historical perspective. Through the formal study of animal ethics, students will also become familiar with different philosophical positions on the use of animals. Physiology and neuroscience will be used to investigate the physical and mental lives of animals while simultaneously exploring domestic animal behavior. Students will explore the biological basis and psychological aspects of the human-animal bond. Students will then study the science of animal welfare and complete a final project in which they will apply their scientific and ethical knowledge to a controversial and contemporary animal welfare question.Students will be expected to read primary literature in such diverse fields as animal science, ethology, neurobiology, sociobiology, anthropology and philosophy. Student success in this program will depend on commitment to in-depth understanding of complex topics and an ability to combine empirical knowledge and philosophical reflection. Michael Paros Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Paula Schofield and Andrew Brabban
Signature Required: Spring 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring The aim of this program is to apply fundamental knowledge and theories of biology and chemistry to practical, real world situations. The application of biology and chemistry has huge impacts on our society, particularly influencing our economy and quality of life. Cutting edge techniques and processes are continually being developed by biologists and chemists to produce the medicines, chemicals and materials we use daily. Products include pharmaceuticals—from synthetic drugs to gene therapies—used to prevent disease and cure illness; biocompatible materials for use in the medical field; fossil-fuel derived synthetic polymers (plastics, fibers, rubbers, etc.); and modern "green" or "sustainable" materials that include biodegradable polymers. These products are widely used by the general public, as well as in a wide array of industries and professions: agriculture, sports, health-care, law enforcement, the military, automotive, food, etc.We will focus on the practical applications of modern biology and chemistry, studying both small and large molecules, natural and synthetic. Based significantly in the laboratory, students will learn the theoretical principles and relevant lab and instrumentation techniques needed to synthesize, isolate and analyze small molecules and macromolecules. We will examine small biological molecules as well as organic molecules, moving to important biological macromolecules (DNA, RNA, proteins) and synthetic polymers (plastics, fibers, biodegradable polymers, green materials). Theory and techniques of molecular cloning, protein biochemistry, biocatalysis and transgenics will be emphasized, as well as synthesis and characterization of relevant organic molecules, polymers and green materials. Seminars on technical literature and student presentations will be significant components of the program. We will also discuss the professional biologist's and chemist's relationship with industry, government and universities, and examine employment opportunities for biologists and chemists. Students will be evaluated based on their laboratory techniques, laboratory reports, class presentations and homework assignments. Paula Schofield Andrew Brabban Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Emilie Bess
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Weekend Su 14Summer Session II From parasites to pollinators, insects have shaped human society from the beginning. explores our intimate relationships with the bugs that we rely on and the bugs that we fear, the central role that insects play in our biosphere, and the unique adaptations that have led to their unparalleled diversity. This class introduces students to insect diversity and ecology, field techniques, and specimen preservation. Each full-day session includes outdoor field work. We learn to draw insects, emphasizing the importance of careful observation of morphology and behavior as learning tools. We also discuss the influence of insects on pop culture and modern society. Graphic arts, such as graphic story telling (e.g. comics), design of insect costumes, and other visual learning tools are integrated into student projects. Emilie Bess Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Alison Styring
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day W 14Winter Birds are considered important indicators of habitat quality and are often the focus of conservation-oriented research, restoration, and monitoring.  A variety of field and analytical methods commonly used in bird monitoring and avian research will be covered.  Theory will be applied to practice in the field and lab where students will develop skills in fieldwork, data management, and statistical analysis.  Students will demonstrate their learning through active participation in all class activities; a detailed field journal; in-class, take-home, and field assignments; and a final project. An understanding of avian natural history is important to any successful project, and students without a working knowledge of the common birds in the South Puget Sound region are expected to improve their identification skills to a level that will allow them to effectively contribute to class efforts both in the field and in class. Alison Styring Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Bill Arney and Michael Paros
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall Most of you are in school because you want to live a better life; many of you probably think about what it might mean to live a good life. Is a good life one full of pleasure and devoid of suffering? A moral life? A long and healthy life? Of course, it is possible that the good life cannot be defined at all and simply has to be lived and attended to. Let's start with the premise that most of our reliable, useful knowledge comes from science. Scientists work according to philosophically sound methodologies, which include commitments to impersonal inquiry and trying, always, to find the data most likely to defeat their favorite hypotheses; they work in open communities of other scientists, all of whom are obligated to be vigilantly critical of their colleagues' work; they generally qualify their claims to knowledge based on the limitations of their methodologies and their understandings of the probabilities of their claims being incorrect. But can science help us to be , to live a good life? Some think that science can help us recognize, even define, our values, and we will explore this possibility from the perspectives of neuroscience, brain evolution, psychology, social science and philosophy. Some say that science can never answer questions of morality or what it means to live a good life, or even a better life; something more is necessary, they say. Reading and written assignments, faculty presentations and deliberate discussions with vigilantly critical colleagues will assist students in an independent inquiry about how science can help a person live better with regard to some question of critical concern to the investigator(s). This program explores the power and limitations of scientific inquiry. Students should be able to imagine themselves discussing neurotransmitters and the moral life in the same sentence, but they should know that any education aims, finally, to help them know themselves. Bill Arney Michael Paros Mon Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Alison Styring
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 14Summer Session I Flight is one of the most fascinating phenomena in nature.  It has evolved independently numerous times across several groups of animals.  This program will investigate the evolution of flight and its ecological consequences.  We will gain experience with standard methods for studying flying animals as we conduct biodiversity surveys at several field sites in the Olympia area.  During the course of this program, we will learn key biological, ecological, and conservation concepts relating to flying organisms as well as field, analytical, and laboratory methods associated with the study of biodiversity.  As a group, we will produce comprehensive inventories for key taxa (birds, dragonflies, and butterflies) at ecologically  important field sites. This is a field-intensive program, and students an expect to spend time in the field Tuesdays-Thursdays. Early morning work will occur 1-2 mornings per week, starting as early as dawn (ca. 5:15 a.m.) Alison Styring Mon Tue Wed Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Michael Paros
Signature Required: Spring 
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring This field-based program will provide students with the fundamental tools to manage livestock and grasslands by exploring the ecological relationships between ruminants and the land. We will begin the quarter learning about the physiology of grasses and their response to grazing and fire. Practical forage identification, morphology and production will be taught. Ruminant nutrition, foraging behavior, and digestive physiology will be covered as a precursor to learning about the practical aspects of establishing, assessing and managing livestock rotational grazing operations. We will divide our time equally between intensive grazing and extensive rangeland systems. Classroom lectures, workshops and guest speakers will be paired with weekly field trips to dairy, beef, sheep and goat grazing farms. There will be overnight trips to Willammette Valley where we will study managed intensive grazing dairy operations and forage production, and Eastern Washington/Oregon where students can practice their skills in rangeland monitoring and grazing plan development. Other special topics that will be covered in the program include: co-evolutionary relationships between ruminants and grasses, targeted and multi-species grazing, prairie ecology and restoration, riparian ecosystems, controversies in public land grazing, interactions between wildlife and domestic ruminants, and perennial grain development. Michael Paros Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Stephen Beck and Karen Hogan
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 12 12 Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter This program will investigate the relationship between philosophical ethics and evolutionary biology. In winter quarter we will further develop our understanding of evolutionary theory and of ethics. Central questions for winter quarter will include: Is the imperative of evolutionary fitness, defined as individual reproductive success, consistent with ethical behavior? Has our evolutionary history as social animals given us an intrinsic sense of moral concern for others? What, if any, are our ethical obligations to near and distant others, to family and to strangers, to other species, and to ecosystems and global ecology? In that context, we’ll develop an understanding of the ways in which ethics can be consistent with a naturalistic conception of the world and an understanding of the fundamental biological processes of life and of the evolution, diversity, and relationships among different forms of life on Earth. Stephen Beck Karen Hogan Tue Wed Sat Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Dylan Fischer and Alison Styring
Signature Required: Spring 
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring This program is designed to provide a premier hands-on experience on learning how to conduct field science in ecology at the advanced undergraduate level. We will focus on group and individual field research to address patterns in ecological composition, structure and function in natural environments. Students will participate in field trips to local and remote field sites and they will be expected to develop multiple independent and group research projects. During the second week of the quarter, the program will be divided into two smaller groups: a Northwest Science group and a Grand Canyon Plants group. A small group of 20 students will participate in a two-week trip to the Grand Canyon, which will include a four-day backpacking excursion and several day trips where we will conduct individual and group research related to plant ecology. Students will be selected for the Grand Canyon experience based on their application and interest.  Students in the Northwest Science group will focus on research in ornithology and Northwest ecosystems with associated workshops in research methods.We will work as a community to develop and implement field projects based on: 1) workshops that will train students in rapid observation and field data collection; 2) participation in large multi-year studies in collaboration with other universities and agencies; and 3) student originated short- and long-term studies. Students will focus on field sampling, natural history and library research to develop workable field data collection protocols. Students will implement observation- and hypothesis-driven field projects. We will then learn to analyze ecological data through a series of workshops on understanding and using statistics. Students will demonstrate their research and analytical skills via writing and presentation of group and individual research projects. Student manuscripts will be "crystallized" through a series of intensive, multi-day paper-writing workshops at the end of the quarter. Students will also give public presentations of their research work in a final research symposium.Specific topics of study will include community and ecosystem ecology, plant physiology, forest structure, ecological restoration, riparian ecology, fire disturbance effects, bird abundance and monitoring, insect-plant interactions, disturbance ecology and the broad fields of bio-complexity and ecological interactions. We will emphasize identification of original field research problems in diverse habitats, experimentation, data analysis, oral presentation of findings and writing in journal format.  Dylan Fischer Alison Styring Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Gerardo Chin-Leo and EJ Zita
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall The Earth’s atmosphere and oceans are affected by human activities, by the Sun and by geologic activity. Over many millions of years, the Earth has experienced wide fluctuations in climate, from ice ages to very warm periods. Earth is currently experiencing an unusually rapid warming trend, due to anthropogenic (human-caused) changes in atmospheric composition. Historically, a major factor determining global climate has been the intensity of the Sun's energy reaching the Earth. However, climate changes cannot be explained by variations in solar radiation alone. This program will examine some of the major interactions between the Earth and Sun, atmosphere and oceans.Interactions between oceans and atmosphere affect the composition of both, and oceans impact global climate by redistributing the Sun's energy. Changes in ocean circulation help explain climatic changes over geologic time, and marine microorganisms play a major role in the cycling of gases that affect climate (e.g., CO2 and dimethylsulfide). What is the evidence for causes of contemporary global warming? What are expected consequences? What can be done? What about proposed schemes to engineer solutions to global warming, such as the sequestration of anthropogenic carbon into the deep sea? We will study diverse and interconnected physical, chemical, geological and biological processes. This requires a basic understanding of biology and chemistry as well as facility with algebra and ability to learn precalculus.Students will learn through lectures, workshops, laboratories and seminars, often using primary scientific literature. Students will do significant teamwork and may research questions that they are particularly interested in. We will have weekly online assignments, so students should be comfortable using computers and the Internet. Gerardo Chin-Leo EJ Zita Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Noelle Machnicki
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter Fungi. What are they? Where are they and what roles do they play in terrestrial ecosystems? How do they get their energy? How do they grow? What do they taste like? How do they interact with other organisms? During this two-quarter long program we will answer these and other questions about fungi. Fall quarter will cover the fundamentals of fungal biology, ecology, diversity and systematics, with an emphasis on the musrhoom-forming fungi of the Pacific Northwest. Students will learn to describe and identify fungi using morphological and microscopic techniques and utilize a variety of taxonomic keys. Students will participate in a quarter-long project to curate their own collections of herbarium-quality mushroom specimens and learn to identify local mushroom species on sight. Several multi-day field trips and day trips will provide students with an opportunity for collecting specimens and studying the natural history of western Washington. During winter quarter, we will explore the diversity other groups of fungi and and study fungi through the lens of forest ecology. Forest ecosystems rest on a foundation of fungi, and students will read the primiary scientific literature to learn about the pivotal roles fungi play as mutualists to plants and animals, as nutrient cyclers, disease-causing agents, and indicators of environmental change. Lab work will focus on advanced methods and examining taxonomically-challenging groups of fungi. Students will also learn about museum curation by organizing and accessioning the class mushroom collection for submission into the Evergreen herbarium. Students will engage in a two-quarter-long group research project relating to fungi. Research topics may include ecology or taxonomy-focused lab and field studies, cultivation or herbarium research. During fall quarter, students will participate in research and writing seminars and quantitative skills workshops to inform their research.  Each group will prepare a concise research proposal including a thorough literature review and a pilot study exploring the most appropriate data collection and analysis methods for answering their research questions. During winter quarter, students will conduct research experiments in the field and/or lab, analyze their data and write a research paper outlining their results. Noelle Machnicki Mon Mon Tue Thu Thu Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Clarissa Dirks
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 14Summer Session II Living systems will be studied on the molecular, cellular, and organismal level. Topics that will be covered include, but are not limited to, biomolecules, cell structure and function, genetics, gene expression and regulation, evolutionary biology, biodiversity, introduction to ecology, plant and animal physiology, and the scientific method. The lab component will reinforce concepts and ideas explored in lectures, readings, and workshops. Some components of our work will take us outside to do field surveys and learn about the ecosystem and habitats around us. This biology course is excellent preparation for students interested in taking more advanced life science courses or for future work in environmental science. Clarissa Dirks Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Donald Morisato and Heather Heying
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall The theory of evolution is the cornerstone of modern biology, unifying disciplines as diverse as molecular genetics and behavioral ecology. Evolution provides an explanation for the extraordinary biological diversity on this planet. What is the best way to study this process—by focusing on the mechanisms producing genetic variation, by looking at modern organisms for evidence of past evolutionary forces or by generating theory that fits with what we already know? At what level does natural selection act—on genes, on organisms, or on groups of organisms? This program will present and discuss some of the big ideas in evolution and at the same time, examine how we, as scientists, with distinct processes and cultures, approach these questions. We will study several aspects of microevolution—the change that occurs within populations, over time spans that are directly observable by humans—and spend time in the field early in the quarter as a class. Our microevolutionary focus will be animal behavior and students will work in pairs on field-based projects throughout the quarter, while regular workshops in statistics will allow students to conduct their own analyses on their data. On a parallel track, we will consider some of the genetic processes underlying this evolutionary change. We will begin with classical Mendelian genetics and move on to a formal treatment of population genetics and analysis of complex traits. We will be undertaking a laboratory project using . This upper-division science program will have an intensive workload, including reading the primary literature and carrying out experimental work in the laboratory and in the field. Student learning will be assessed by problems sets, writing assignments, statistics workshops and exams. Donald Morisato Heather Heying Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Amy Cook and Ralph Murphy
  Program FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter This program is designed to serve as a foundation for advanced programs in Environmental Studies. It will survey a range of disciplines and skills essential for environmental problem solving from both a scientific and social science perspective. Specifically, we will study ecological principles and methods, aquatic ecology, methods of analysis in environmental studies, the political and economic history of environmental policy making in the United States, micro-economics and political science. This information will be used to analyze current issues and topics in environmental studies.In fall quarter, we will study ecology with a focus on aquatic systems. We will examine the major physical and chemical characteristics of aquatic environments, the organisms that live in these environments and the factors controlling the species diversity, distribution and growth of aquatic and terrestrial organisms. These scientific issues will be grounded in the context of politics, economics and public policy. During fall quarter we will examine, from the founding era to the present, how the values of democracy and capitalism influence resource management, the scope and limitations of governmental policymaking, regulatory agencies and environmental law. Understanding the different levels (federal, state, local) of governmental responsibility for environmental protection will be explored in depth. Field trips and case studies will offer opportunities to see how science and policy interact in environmental issues. During fall quarter, we will develop an introduction to research design, quantitative reasoning and statistics.In winter, the focus will shift to a more global scale. We will examine in depth several major challenges for the early 21st century; forest and fish resources, global warming and marine pollution. These are three related topics that require an understanding of the science, politics and economics of each issue and how they interact with one another. Globalism, political and economic development and political unrest and uncertainty will be discussed within each topic as well as how these macro-level problems overlap one another. During winter quarter, micro-economics will be studied as a problem solving tool for environmental issues as well as an introduction to environmental economic analysis.The material will be presented through lectures, seminars, labs, field trips/field work and quantitative methods (statistics) and economics workshops. Labs and field trips will examine the organisms that live in aquatic systems, measure water quality and study local terrestrial habitats. Quantitative methods workshops will present the use of computers to organize and analyze data. Microeconomic principles and methods will provide the foundation for environmental economic analysis. Amy Cook Ralph Murphy Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Fall Fall Winter
James Neitzel, Mario Gadea and Kristopher Waynant
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 12, 16 12 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This introductory-level program is designed for students who are prepared to take their first year of college-level science using an interdisciplinary framework. This program offers an integrated study of biology, chemistry, and physics that serves as an introduction to the concepts, theories and structures which underlie all the natural sciences. Our goal is to equip students with the conceptual, methodological and quantitative tools that they will need to ask and answer questions that arise in a variety of disciplines using the models and tools of chemistry, biology, and physics. . Students will also gain a strong appreciation of the interconnectedness of biological and physical systems, and an ability to apply this knowledge to complex problemProgram activities will include lectures and small-group problem-solving workshops, where conceptual and technical skills will be developed. There will be a significant laboratory component--students can expect to spend at least a full day in lab each week, maintain laboratory notebooks, write formal laboratory reports and give formal presentations of their work. Biology laboratories in this program will include participation in the SEA-PHAGE program coordinated by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the use of bioinformatics tools on a bacteriophage genome. We will make extensive use of mathematical modeling in all program activities.Seminar will enable us to apply our growing understanding of scientific principles and methodology to societal issues such as genetic testing and engineering or the causes and effects of climate change. In addition to studying current scientific theories, we will consider the historical, societal and personal factors that influence our thinking about the natural world. Students will be exposed to the primary literature of these sciences and develop skill in writing for diverse audiences. During spring quarter, students will have the opportunity to design and carry out their own laboratory investigations, the results of which they will present in talks and papers at the end of the quarter.All laboratory work and approximately one half of the non-lecture time will be spent working in collaborative problem-solving groups. It will be a rigorous program, requiring a serious commitment of time and effort. Overall, we expect students to end the program in the spring with a solid working knowledge of scientific and mathematical concepts, and with the ability to reason critically and solve problems.Students completing this program will have covered material equivalent to one year of general biology and general chemistry, with a significant amount of physics. James Neitzel Mario Gadea Kristopher Waynant Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Peter Impara and Dina Roberts
Signature Required: Winter 
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter How do we manage the habitat of mammals and birds, especially endangered species, in the Pacific Northwest? Mammals and birds are intelligent, complex animals that often have very specific habitat needs for successful living and reproduction. They interact in very elaborate ways with members of their species, other species, and with the landscape as a whole.  A detailed understanding of habitat needs and how these habitats are distributed across the landscape is crucial to managing landscape to ensure future survival of particular species.This upper-division program will focus on examining and analyzing the habitat needs of specific species. Students will learn, develop and apply an intricate interdisciplinary suite of knowledge and techniques that include spatial analysis, ecological modeling, integration of scientific, legal and political information, and computer tools such as Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to develop habitat conservation plans for threatened and endangered species as listed under the Endangered Species Act of 1973.Students will learn about the natural history of specific mammals and birds of the Pacific Northwest and other regions.  Habitat analysis will be conducted at the landscape scale, integrating the disciplines of landscape ecology with wildlife habitat analysis, wildlife biology, and habitat conservation planning. A final two-quarter project will be to develop and present a formal habitat conservation plan (HCP) for a threatened or endangered Pacific Northwest mammal or bird. Students will be required to understand and apply legal concepts associated with the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (as amended) as well as develop an understanding of stakeholders’ concerns and related issues surrounding resource users that may or may not come into conflict with the conservation of their selected species.Lectures will cover the areas of landscape ecology, wildlife habitat analysis, wildlife biology, evolution, and habitat conservation planning. Guest speakers will present recent case studies and approaches to conservation planning. Field trips to locations where wildlife management and conservation are occurring will expose students to methods of habitat assessment, conservation and restoration. Peter Impara Dina Roberts Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Gerardo Chin-Leo
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 14Summer Session I This program introduces principles of marine biology focusing on the marine life and marine habitats of the Pacific Northwest coast. We will study the environment, taxonomy, adaptations, and ecology of marine organisms as well as the major oceanographic features of the northwest coast. There will be various field trips including a camping trip to the Olympic Peninsula and possibly a sailboat trip. Gerardo Chin-Leo Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Lydia McKinstry and Clarissa Dirks
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This program develops and interrelates concepts in experimental (laboratory and field) biology, organic chemistry and biochemistry, thus providing a foundation for students who plan to continue studies in chemistry, laboratory and field biology and medicine. Students will carry out upper-division work in biochemistry, microbiology, cellular and molecular biology, field biology and organic chemistry in a yearlong sequence. This program will also give students many of the prerequisites needed for the following health careers: medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, naturopathy, optometry and pharmacy.The program examines the subject matter through the central idea that structure defines function, integrating a scaled theme from the "cell" to the "molecule" and "ecosystem" levels. We will start with the cell and proceed to the whole organism and ecosystem with the examination of structure-function relationships at all levels. We will examine organic chemistry, the nature of organic compounds and reactions and carry this work into biochemistry and the fundamental chemical reactions of living systems. As the year progresses, the scaled theme will continue through studies of cellular and molecular processes in biological systems.Each aspect of the program will contain a significant laboratory component, some of which may be based on field experiments, involving extensive hands-on learning. On a weekly basis, students will be writing papers and maintaining laboratory notebooks. All laboratory work, and approximately one half of the non-lecture time will be spent working in collaborative problem solving groups. Group work will also include reading and discussion of topics of current or historical significance in science. This is an intensive program; the subjects are complex, and the sophisticated understanding we expect to develop will require students to work for many hours each week, both in and out of class. laboratory and field biology, chemistry, education, medicine and health science. Lydia McKinstry Clarissa Dirks Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Heesoon Jun and Bret Weinstein
  Program FR ONLYFreshmen Only 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter The human mind is perhaps the most fascinating, and least understood, product of Darwinian evolution. In this program we will endeavor to understand how the mind functions and why it has come to work in the way that it has. We will study human psychology as modern empirical science has come to understand it, and we will combine that hybrid model with a consideration of the evolutionary path humans have traversed, as well as a deep investigation of those portions of evolutionary theory most relevant to hominid cognition, perception and behavior. Our program will seek to unify important conclusions from multiple schools of thought within psychology as we consider humans from a broadly cross-cultural perspective. We will range from the Jungian to the Cognitive, and from the modern !Kung people of the Kalahari to the ancient Maya of Central America. Our objective is to generate an integrative model of the human mind that can accommodate humans as individuals and as interdependent social beings.Winter materials will build on content covered in the fall. There will be educational value and intellectual reward for staying in the program both quarters. biology, psychology, health related studies, human and social services. Heesoon Jun Bret Weinstein Tue Tue Wed Wed Fri Fri Freshmen FR Fall Fall Winter
Erik Thuesen
  Program FR ONLYFreshmen Only 16 16 Day F 13 Fall Water is essential to life, and the environmental policies related to marine and aquatic ecosystems will provide many of the subjects for our study in this full-year program. When combined with introductory policy components starting with the Pacific Northwest and looking globally, our studies of the biological, physical and chemical characteristics of oceans will provide the valuable knowledge necessary to make instrumental decisions about marine resources and habitats. It is essential to understand the interconnections between biology and ecology in order to make informed decisions about how environmental policy should proceed. This core program is designed to provide scientific skills and policy knowledge necessary to understand problems facing Earth’s ecosystems. Learning will take place through lectures, seminars, a workshop series and biology laboratory exercises. Work in the field and multi-day field trips in fall and winter are also planned to gain first-hand exposure to various marine environments.In the fall, we will cover standard topics of first year college biology, using marine organisms as our foci. The overall objective of this component is to gain basic familiarity with the biology and ecology of ocean life. We will examine the use and abuse of decision-making authority in order to assess how science and culture interact to safeguard endangered biota. Specific topics will include policies surrounding marine mammals, anadromous fish, ocean acidification, etc.  Fall quarter topics will be mostly gathered from local and regional issues. Erik Thuesen Freshmen FR Fall Fall
Rika Anderson
  Program FR ONLYFreshmen Only 16 16 Day W 14Winter Water is essential to life, and the environmental policies related to marine and aquatic ecosystems will provide many of the subjects for our study in this program. When combined with introductory policy components starting with the Pacific Northwest and looking globally, our studies of the biological, physical and chemical characteristics of oceans will provide the valuable knowledge necessary to make instrumental decisions about marine resources and habitats. It is essential to understand the interconnections between biology and ecology in order to make informed decisions about how environmental policy should proceed. This core program is designed to provide scientific skills and policy knowledge necessary to understand problems facing Earth’s ecosystems. Learning will take place through lectures, seminars, a workshop series and laboratory exercises.We will approach these issues from the perspective of the whole ocean ecosystem: how do currents, seasons, nutrient cycles, and other physical and chemical properties affect life in our oceans? What part does each type of organism play within the ecosystem? How can changes in one component of the ecosystem have ripple effects on the rest? We will apply this scientific knowledge to critically assess important marine environmental issues, focusing on ocean acidification, climate change, fisheries policy, and deep-sea mining. A week-long field trip to Friday Harbor will provide hands-on oceanographic experience, and a trip to the Capitol will allow us to witness legislation of important marine issues in action. Rika Anderson Freshmen FR Winter Winter
David Muehleisen and Stephen Bramwell
Signature Required: Fall 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall David Muehleisen Stephen Bramwell Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
David Muehleisen and Paul Przybylowicz
Signature Required: Summer
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day Su 14Summer Full This is a spring, summer, fall program and is open to new students in summer.  For the full program description, see . The weekly schedule will be similar to spring, which is Mon 1-3, Tue 8-4:30, Wed 9-1, and Thu 8-4:30.  David Muehleisen Paul Przybylowicz Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Kenneth Tabbutt and Alison Styring
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall , Latin for , is the root of riparian.  Riparian zones are the interface between land and stream and are some of the most dynamic and fascinating geological and ecological systems on the planet.  They are the boundary between biomes and an area of biological and hydrological diversity.  This upper-division science program will focus on aspects of this unique environment.  Students will learn about the hydrology of river systems and fluvial geomorphology and the animals that populate these corridors.  Field studies and applied project work will be emphasized.  Students will learn how to use Geographic Information Systems (GIS) as a tool for analyzing and displaying spatial data.  The program will include a week-long field trip around the Olympic Peninsula. Kenneth Tabbutt Alison Styring Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Carolyn Prouty, Trisha Vickrey and Wenhong Wang
Signature Required: Winter  Spring 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This introductory, three-quarter interdisciplinary program explores the basics of health and illness through the lenses of biology, chemistry and medical sociology.  We will focus on the social, cultural and scientific aspects of human health and health care primarily in the U.S., with some comparative examination of global health topics. Our case-based approach will incorporate human biology, anatomy, physiology, nutrition,  general chemistry and statistics, while also examining the social aspects of health, illness, and health care.Enhancing our study of human systems biology and chemistry, we will examine topics such as epilepsy, cancer, diabetes, tobacco, and HIV/AIDS, how cultures interact with medical systems, and end-of-life decision-making. These specific topics will provide a platform to explore health care systems and health care reform, social and cultural constructions of health and illness, the social determinants of health, role development of health care professionals and their relationships with patients, and ethical issues involved in medical fields. We’ll also cover basic descriptive and inferential statistics, which will give us quantitative tools to untangle some of the complex issues within these topics.Program activities will include lectures, seminar, lab work, workshops, small-group problem solving, guest lectures, film viewing, and individual and group projects. Students will undertake writing, and statistical assignments focused on interpreting and integrating the topics covered. Students will learn the foundational skills of scientific research; how to find, interpret, and evaluate primary medical literature; and how to critically examine issues related to human health through a variety of lenses.Students who complete three quarters will have a solid foundation in human biology, chemistry, human anatomy, physiology, nutrition, statistics, and medical sociology with a working knowledge of the scientific, social and ethical principles relating to human health and public health. Carolyn Prouty Trisha Vickrey Wenhong Wang Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Paula Schofield and Andrew Brabban
  Program FR ONLYFreshmen Only 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter Are you curious about the world around you? Would you like to really understand "buzz terms" the media uses such as sustainability, green materials, climate change, the water crisis, the energy debate, genetic engineering, DNA fingerprinting and cloning? How can we believe what we are being told? What is the evidence? How is scientific data actually collected, and what analytical methods are being used? Are the correct conclusions being drawn? As responsible citizens we should know the answers to these questions.In this two-quarter program we will demystify the hype surrounding popular myths, critically examine the data, and use scientific reasoning and experimental design to come to our own conclusions. In fall, we will study "water" and "energy" as themes to examine our environment, considering local and global water issues. We will also examine current energy use and demand, critically assessing various sources of energy: fossil fuels, nuclear, hydropower, etc.We will begin the program on September 23 (Orientation Week), one week BEFORE the regularly scheduled fall quarter start, so that we are prepared for our field trip by beginning our study of energy, and establishing our learning community. The Eastern Washington field trip will be a unique opportunity for personalized tours of Hanford Reactor B (the world's first full-scale nuclear reactor which produced the plutonium for the "Fat Man" bomb dropped over Nagasaki in 1945), Grand Coulee Dam (the largest hydropower producer in the U.S.), and the Wild Horse Wind and Solar Energy facility (150 turbines across 10,000 acres serving more than 80,000 homes). On this trip, we will also learn key field science techniques: how to take measurements in the field, collect samples for laboratory analysis and precisely determine concentrations of nutrients and pollutants.In winter quarter, we will use "natural and synthetic materials" as a theme to study petrochemical plastics, biodegradable plastics and other sustainable materials, as well as key biological materials such as proteins and DNA. We will carefully examine the properties of these materials in the laboratory and study their role in the real world. "Forensics" will be our final theme, learning techniques such as DNA fingerprinting, blood spatter analysis, ballistics and other modern forensic procedures.In this field- and lab-based program, scientific analysis—rather than conjecture or gut-feeling—will be the foundation of our work. Other class activities will include small group problem-solving workshops, seminars, student researched presentations and lectures. Paula Schofield Andrew Brabban Freshmen FR Fall Fall Winter
Amy Cook, Catalina Ocampo and Chico Herbison
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring —Alicia Imperiale, “Seminal Space: Getting Under the Digital Skin” Organ, membrane, boundary and border. Canvas, map, metaphor and trope. Skin is the identity that all animals present to the world. It has multiple physiological functions and takes a wide variety of forms, from the simple epidermis of a sea anemone to the complex light show of a squid or the intricate system of spines that protects a porcupine. In human culture, skin functions as a marker of “race”/ethnicity, age and gender; provides a canvas on which to create very personal forms of art and cultural narratives; and, in the 21st century, has become a critical site of interface between the “real” and the virtual.In this introductory program we will look at skin through the lenses of biology, culture and art. The biology of skin includes its visual and olfactory role in communication, its structure and physiology and its role in defense of the body from both microbes and large predators. Our exploration of skin in/as culture and art will include encounters with the mythology of “race,” body modification (piercing, tattooing and plastic surgery) and the posthuman meanings of skin (in cyberspace and in the world of cyborgs, androids and prosthetics).Program activities will include lectures; labs in which we will examine the microscopic structure of skin and learn about the various structures that arise from it, including scales, feathers and hair; seminars on a selection of texts (books, films and other texts) that look at skin from a variety of different perspectives; and workshops in which students will explore skin through their own creative writing. Students will have the opportunity to develop a deeper understanding of biology and humanities in an interdisciplinary setting, as well as sharpen their critical thinking and reading and college writing skills. biology and the humanities. Amy Cook Catalina Ocampo Chico Herbison Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Steven G. Herman
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day, Evening and Weekend Su 14Summer Session II Summer Ornithology is a three week bird-banding course taught entirely in the field.  We leave campus on the first day, travel through some of the best birding country in Oregon, then over the next few days find and set up camp in a place where we can net, process, and band a sufficient number of birds to provide all students with appropriate experience.  We spend the next two weeks netting, processing, banding, and releasing several hundred birds of about 25 species.  We focus on aspects of banding protocol, including net placement, removing birds from nets, identification, sexing, ageing, and record-keeping.  We balance the in-hand work with field identification and behavioral observations, and during the last week we tour Steens Mountain and the Malheur area.  This course has been taught for over 30 years, and more than 24,000 birds have been banded during that time.  Lower or upper-division credit is awarded depending of the level of academic achievement demonstrated. A photo essay on this program is available through and a slide show is available through . Steven G. Herman Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Donald Morisato and Bob Haft
Signature Required: Spring 
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day W 14Winter S 14Spring Both science and art take things apart. In some instances—the evisceration of a frog or an overly analytical critique of a poem—the process can result in the loss of the vital force. In the best scenario, carefully isolating and understanding individual parts actually reconstitutes the original object of study, bringing appreciation for a whole greater than its parts. Sometimes taking things apart results in a paradigm shift: suddenly, the ordinary becomes extraordinary.In one program strand, we use a biologist's tool kit to explore how living organisms function. We learn how biology takes apart and studies life in different ways. In winter, we focus on visual perception, beginning with anatomy, proceeding onto the logic of visual processing, and concluding with an examination of the specialized neurons and molecules involved in phototransduction. In spring quarter, we play with the idea of mutation, exploring how genetics is used to dissect complex processes and provide an entry point for the molecular understanding of inheritance at the level of DNA.Another strand takes visual art as its point of departure. Here, we combine what we learn about the anatomy and physiology of the eye with a study of using sight to apprehend and appreciate the world around us. We will work with different tools—charcoal pencils and cameras—both to take apart and to construct new things. During winter quarter, we will learn the basics of drawing. In spring, we use black-and-white photography to study life at a more macroscopic level than in the biology lab. Ultimately, our goal here is the same as that of the scientist: to reconstitute and reanimate the world around us.There are ideas for which literature provides a more sophisticated and satisfying approach than either science or the visual arts. Thus, in a third strand, we examine how literature depicts and dissects the emotional and behavioral interactions that we call "love." Authors we read will include Shakespeare, Stendhal, Henry James, Virginia Woolf, James Baldwin, John Berger, Haruki Murakami and Louise Gluck.Our goal is to weave these strands together to produce an understanding about the world informed by both cognition and intuition. Throughout our inquiry, we will be investigating the philosophical issue of objectivity. This is a rigorous program involving lectures, workshops, seminars, studio art and laboratory science work. Student learning will be assessed by weekly seminar writing assignments, lab reports, art portfolios and exams. Donald Morisato Bob Haft Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter Spring
Dylan Fischer and Paul Przybylowicz
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter The Pacific Northwest is home to temperate rainforests, among the most biologically complex ecosystems in the world. How did these forests develop? How do they function? How do human activities affect them? Is sustainable harvest a reality or an oxymoron? We will use a biogeochemical lens to examine these forests, their effects on us and our impacts on them. Topics covered will include forest ecology, ecosystem ecology, soils, mycology, biogeochemistry, sustainable forestry and forest conservation.In fall quarter, we will explore how forests “work” through studying forest ecosystem science that includes both global and regional perspectives, with a focus on carbon and nutrient cycling. We will also examine the tremendous fungal biodiversity found within temperate rainforests, particularly the local forests of the Pacific Northwest. We’ll cover methods in forest biogeochemical measurement, fungal biology, taxonomy and advanced forest ecology.Human impacts on temperate rainforests will be the focus of winter quarter. We’ll focus on sustainable forestry, both theory and practice, along with an examination of soils and the life within them, which will deepen our understanding of forest function and the short- and long-term impacts of various forestry practices. These topics will merge as we explore carbon sequestration in forest ecosystems, which is an emerging component of “sustainable” forestry. We will explore current and past controversies in forest ecology related to old-growth forests, spotted owls and other endangered species and biofuels.Our program time will consist of field work, laboratory work, lectures, workshops and weekly seminars. Expect to research topics in the primary scientific literature and to summarize and share your findings with the entire class. We’ll cover various sampling techniques that are used to measure nitrogen, water and carbon in forested ecosystems. There will be ample opportunities for independent directed work, both individually and in small groups.In addition to one-day trips regularly scheduled throughout both quarters, there will be a 4-day field trip each quarter. In the fall, we’ll spend four days doing field research in temperate rainforests. In the winter, we’ll tour through the Pacific Northwest and visit a variety of managed and unmanaged forests. Plan to spend a lot of time in the field (and remember that every field day generates 3-4 days of work once we return). Students who may need accommodations for field trips should contact the faculty as soon as possible. Dylan Fischer Paul Przybylowicz Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Paula Schofield, Neil Switz, David McAvity, Andrew Brabban, Brian Walter, Richard Weiss, Abir Biswas, Michael Paros, Clyde Barlow, Judith Cushing, Dharshi Bopegedera, Rebecca Sunderman, EJ Zita, Donald Morisato, Clarissa Dirks, James Neitzel, Sheryl Shulman, Neal Nelson and Lydia McKinstry
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Scientific Inquiry. Research opportunities allow science students to work on specific projects associated with faculty members’ expertise. Students typically begin by working in an apprenticeship model with faculty or laboratory staff and gradually take on more independent projects within the context of the specific research program as they gain experience. Students can develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, modeling and theoretical analysis, written and oral communication, collaboration and critical thinking. These are valuable skills for students pursuing a graduate degree or entering the job market.Faculty offering undergraduate research opportunities are listed below. Contact them directly if you are interested. (chemistry) works with biophysical applications of spectroscopy to study physiological processes at the organ level, with direct applications to health problems. Students with backgrounds in biology, chemistry, physics, mathematics or computer science can obtain practical experience in applying their backgrounds to biomedical research problems in an interdisciplinary laboratory environment.. (geology, earth science) studies nutrient and toxic trace metal cycles in terrestrial and coastal ecosystems. Potential projects could include studies of mineral weathering, wildfires and mercury cycling in ecosystems. Students could pursue these interests at the laboratory-scale or through field-scale biogeochemistry studies taking advantage of the Evergreen Ecological Observation Network (EEON), a long-term ecological study area. Students with backgrounds in a combination of geology, biology or chemistry could gain skills in soil, vegetation and water collection and learn methods of sample preparation and analysis for major and trace elements. (biotechnology) studies the physiology and biochemistry of prokaryotes of industrial and agricultural importance. Students who commit at least a full year to a research project, enrolling for 4 to 16 credits each quarter, will learn a broad range of microbiology (both aerobic and anaerobic techniques), molecular (DNA analysis and cloning), and biochemical techniques (chemical and pathway analysis, protein isolation). Students will also have opportunities for internships at the USDA and elsewhere, and to present data at national and international conferences. (chemistry) would like to engage students in two projects. (1) Quantitative determination of metals in the stalactites formed in aging concrete using ICP-MS. Students who are interested in learning about the ICP-MS technique and using it for quantitative analysis will find this project interesting. (2) Science and education. We will work with local teachers to develop lab activities that enhance the science curriculum in local schools. Students who have an interest in teaching science and who have completed general chemistry with laboratory would be ideal for this project. (computer science, ecology informatics) studies how scientists might better use information technology and visualization in their research, particularly in ecology and environmental studies. She would like to work with students who have a background in computer science or one of the sciences (e.g., ecology, biology, chemistry or physics), and who are motivated to explore how new computing paradigms can be harnessed to improve the individual and collaborative work of scientists. Such technologies include visualizations, plugins, object-oriented systems, new database technologies and "newer" languages that scientists themselves use such as python or R. (biology) aims to better understand the evolutionary principles that underlie the emergence, spread and containment of infectious disease by studying the coevolution of retroviruses and their primate hosts. Studying how host characteristics and ecological changes influence virus transmission in lemurs will enable us to address the complex spatial and temporal factors that impact emerging diseases. Students with a background in biology and chemistry will gain experience in molecular biology techniques, including tissue culture and the use of viral vectors. (organic chemistry) is interested in organic synthesis research, including asymmetric synthesis methodology, chemical reaction dynamics and small molecule synthesis. One specific study involves the design and synthesis of enzyme inhibitor molecules to be used as effective laboratory tools with which to study the mechanistic steps of programmed cell death (e.g., in cancer cells). Students with a background in organic chemistry and biology will gain experience with the laboratory techniques of organic synthesis as well as the techniques of spectroscopy. (biology) is interested in the developmental biology of the embryo, a model system for analyzing how patterning occurs. Maternally encoded signaling pathways establish the anterior-posterior and dorsal-ventral axes. Individual student projects will use a combination of genetic, molecular biological and biochemical approaches to investigate the spatial regulation of this complex process. (biochemistry) uses methods from organic and analytical chemistry to study biologically interesting molecules. A major focus of his current work is on fatty acids; in particular, finding spectroscopic and chromatographic methods to identify fatty acids in complex mixtures and to detect changes that occur in fats during processing or storage. This has relevance both for foods and in biodiesel production. The other major area of interest is in plant natural products, such as salicylates. Work is in process screening local plants for the presence of these molecules, which are important plant defense signals. Work is also supported in determining the nutritional value of indigenous plants. Students with a background and interest in organic, analytical or biochemistry could contribute to this work. (computer science) and (computer science) are interested in working with advanced computer topics and current problems in the application of computing to the sciences. Their areas of interest include simulations of advanced architectures for distributed computing, advanced programming languages and compilers, programming languages for concurrent and parallel computing and hardware modeling languages. (biology, veterinary medicine) is interested in animal health and diseases that affect the animal agriculture industry. Currently funded research includes the development of bacteriophage therapy for dairy cattle uterine infections, calf salmonellosis and mastitis. A number of hands-on laboratory projects are available to students interested in pursuing careers in science. (organic, polymer, materials chemistry) is interested in the interdisciplinary fields of biodegradable plastics and biomedical polymers. Research in the field of biodegradable plastics is becoming increasingly important to replace current petroleum-derived materials and to reduce the environmental impact of plastic wastes. Modification of starch through copolymerization and use of bacterial polyesters show promise in this endeavor. Specific projects within biomedical polymers involve the synthesis of poly (lactic acid) copolymers that have potential for use in tissue engineering. Students with a background in chemistry and biology will gain experience in the synthesis and characterization of these novel polymer materials. Students will present their work at American Chemical Society (ACS) conferences. (computer science) is interested in working with advanced computer topics and current problems in the application of computing to the sciences. Her areas of interest include simulations of advanced architectures for distributed computing, advanced programming languages and compilers, programming languages for concurrent and parallel computing, and hardware modeling languages. (inorganic/materials chemistry, physical chemistry) is interested in the synthesis and property characterization of new bismuth-containing materials. These compounds have been characterized as electronic conductors, attractive activators for luminescent materials, second harmonic generators and oxidation catalysts for several organic compounds. Traditional solid-state synthesis methods will be utilized to prepare new complex bismuth oxides. Once synthesized, powder x-ray diffraction patterns will be obtained and material properties such as conductivity, melting point, biocidal tendency, coherent light production and magnetic behavior will be examined when appropriate. (mathematics) is interested in problems relating to graphs, combinatorial games and especially combinatorial games played on graphs. He would like to work with students who have a strong background in mathematics and/or computer science and who are interested in applying their skills to open-ended problems relating to graphs and/or games. (computer science, mathematics) has several ongoing projects in computer vision, robotics and security. There are some opportunities for students to develop cybersecurity games for teaching network security concepts and skills. In robotics, he is looking for students to develop laboratory exercises for several different mobile robotic platforms, including Scribbler, LEGO NXT and iRobot Create. This would also involve writing tools for image processing and computer vision using sequences of still images, video streams and 2.5-D images from the Kinect. In addition, he is open to working with students who have their own ideas for projects in these and related areas, such as machine learning, artificial intelligence and analysis of processor performance. (physics) studies the Sun and the Earth. What are the mechanisms of global warming? What can we expect in the future? What can we do about it right now? How do solar changes affect Earth over decades (e.g., Solar Max) to millennia? Why does the Sun shine a bit more brightly when it is more magnetically active, even though sunspots are dark? Why does the Sun's magnetic field flip every 11 years? Why is the temperature of the Sun’s outer atmosphere millions of degrees higher than that of its surface? Students can do research related to global warming in Zita's academic programs and in contracts, and have investigated the Sun by analyzing data from solar observatories and using theory and computer modeling. Serious students are encouraged to form research contracts and may thereafter be invited to join our research team. Please go to the catalog view for specific information about each option. Paula Schofield Neil Switz David McAvity Andrew Brabban Brian Walter Richard Weiss Abir Biswas Michael Paros Clyde Barlow Judith Cushing Dharshi Bopegedera Rebecca Sunderman EJ Zita Donald Morisato Clarissa Dirks James Neitzel Sheryl Shulman Neal Nelson Lydia McKinstry Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Andrew Brabban
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Scientific Inquiry. Research opportunities allow science students to work on specific projects associated with faculty members’ expertise. Students typically begin by working in an apprenticeship model with faculty or laboratory staff and gradually take on more independent projects within the context of the specific research program as they gain experience. Students can develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, modeling and theoretical analysis, written and oral communication, collaboration and critical thinking. These are valuable skills for students pursuing a graduate degree or entering the job market. (biotechnology) studies the physiology and biochemistry of prokaryotes of industrial and agricultural importance. Students who commit at least a full year to a research project, enrolling for 4 to 16 credits each quarter, will learn a broad range of microbiology (both aerobic and anaerobic techniques), molecular (DNA analysis and cloning), and biochemical techniques (chemical and pathway analysis, protein isolation). Students will also have opportunities for internships at the USDA and elsewhere, and to present data at national and international conferences. Andrew Brabban Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Clyde Barlow
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Scientific Inquiry. Research opportunities allow science students to work on specific projects associated with faculty members’ expertise. Students typically begin by working in an apprenticeship model with faculty or laboratory staff and gradually take on more independent projects within the context of the specific research program as they gain experience. Students can develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, modeling and theoretical analysis, written and oral communication, collaboration and critical thinking. These are valuable skills for students pursuing a graduate degree or entering the job market. (chemistry) works with biophysical applications of spectroscopy to study physiological processes at the organ level, with direct applications to health problems. Students with backgrounds in biology, chemistry, physics, mathematics or computer science can obtain practical experience in applying their backgrounds to biomedical research problems in an interdisciplinary laboratory environment. Clyde Barlow Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Clarissa Dirks
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Scientific Inquiry. Research opportunities allow science students to work on specific projects associated with faculty members’ expertise. Students typically begin by working in an apprenticeship model with faculty or laboratory staff and gradually take on more independent projects within the context of the specific research program as they gain experience. Students can develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, modeling and theoretical analysis, written and oral communication, collaboration and critical thinking. These are valuable skills for students pursuing a graduate degree or entering the job market. (biology) aims to better understand the evolutionary principles that underlie the emergence, spread and containment of infectious disease by studying the coevolution of retroviruses and their primate hosts. Studying how host characteristics and ecological changes influence virus transmission in lemurs will enable us to address the complex spatial and temporal factors that impact emerging diseases. Students with a background in biology and chemistry will gain experience in molecular biology techniques, including tissue culture and the use of viral vectors. Clarissa Dirks Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
David McAvity
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Scientific Inquiry. This independent learning opportunity allows advanced students to delve into real-world research with faculty who are currently engaged in specific projects. Students typically begin by working in apprenticeship with faculty or laboratory staff and gradually take on more independent projects within the context of the specific research program as they gain experience. Students can develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, written and oral communication, collaboration, and critical thinking that are valuable for students pursuing a graduate degree or entering the job market. (mathematics) is interested in problems in mathematical biology associated with population and evolutionary dynamics. Students working with him will help create computer simulations using agent-based modeling and cellular automata and analyzing non-linear models for the evolution of cooperative behavior in strategic multiplayer evolutionary games. Students should have a strong mathematics or computer science background. theoretical biology, computer science, mathematics. David McAvity Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Donald Morisato
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Scientific Inquiry. Research opportunities allow science students to work on specific projects associated with faculty members’ expertise. Students typically begin by working in an apprenticeship model with faculty or laboratory staff and gradually take on more independent projects within the context of the specific research program as they gain experience. Students can develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, modeling and theoretical analysis, written and oral communication, collaboration and critical thinking. These are valuable skills for students pursuing a graduate degree or entering the job market. (biology) is interested in the developmental biology of the embryo, a model system for analyzing how patterning occurs. Maternally encoded signaling pathways establish the anterior-posterior and dorsal-ventral axes. Individual student projects will use a combination of genetic, molecular biological and biochemical approaches to investigate the spatial regulation of this complex process. biology, health sciences. Donald Morisato Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Michael Paros
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Scientific Inquiry. Research opportunities allow science students to work on specific projects associated with faculty members’ expertise. Students typically begin by working in an apprenticeship model with faculty or laboratory staff and gradually take on more independent projects within the context of the specific research program as they gain experience. Students can develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, modeling and theoretical analysis, written and oral communication, collaboration and critical thinking. These are valuable skills for students pursuing a graduate degree or entering the job market. (biology, veterinary medicine) is interested in animal health and diseases that affect the animal agriculture industry. Currently funded research includes the development of bacteriophage therapy for dairy cattle uterine infections, calf salmonellosis and mastitis. A number of hands-on laboratory projects are available to students interested in pursuing careers in science. biology and veterinary medicine. Michael Paros Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Neil Switz
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research SO–SRSophomore - Senior 6 06 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Research opportunities allow science students to work on specific projects associated with faculty members’ expertise. Students typically begin by working in an apprenticeship model with faculty or laboratory staff and gradually take on more independent projects within the context of the specific research program as they gain experience. Students can develop skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, modeling and theoretical analysis, written and oral communication, collaboration and critical thinking. Laboratory experience is especially important – and useful – for students planning to pursue graduate studies or enter the technical job market. (physics) develops optical instruments for use in biophysical and biomedical applications, including low-cost diagnostics. Projects in the lab are suitable for motivated students with quantitative backgrounds in physics, biology, chemistry, mathematics or computer science. Neil Switz Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Lori Blewett and Karen Hogan
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 12 12 Evening and Weekend S 14Spring This program explores biological, social, and political dimensions of food. We’ll consider the basic biological composition and processes of our bodies, and learn why some foods are necessary and others are bad for us. These biological questions will be studied in relation to cultural and political constructions of food including discourses of consumption, identity, and sustainability. We’ll explore some recent hot topics related to food, including diet and obesity, GMO food labeling, crop genetic diversity, and food sovereignty.  We’re especially interested in public rhetoric on these subjects – how scientific facts and ideas are represented and misrepresented in public debate, how food consumption and related social identities are influenced by media, and how food activism is challenging trends in corporate food production.  We’ll examine a variety of media sources, including journalism, online sources, and films.  Lori Blewett Karen Hogan Wed Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring