2013-14 Catalog

Decorative graphic

2013-14 Undergraduate Index A-Z

Have feedback about the online catalog or ideas about what Evergreen could offer in the future?

Education [clear]


Title   Offering Standing Credits Credits When F W S Su Description Preparatory Faculty Days Multiple Standings Start Quarters Open Quarters
Hirsh Diamant and Nancy Parkes
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 12 12 Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter Students in this interdisciplinary program, which continues from Fall quarter, will learn how to cultivate a “sense of wonder” while building skills as writers, activists, artists, and interdisciplinary scholars.  Our work will combine theory and practice as we delve into the rich areas of literature, cultural studies, writing, creative arts, contemplative practice, natural history, and environmental/outdoor education.  We will explore how we develop roots to the natural world and explore themes related to natural history literature, the Pacific Northwest, and global multicultural traditions that have intimate connections to place, family, education, and artistic practice. At the core of our inquiry will be the questions:  What enlivens culture?  What motivates change?  Working from a rich, interdisciplinary perspective, we will study what it means to be rooted to place and how place connects us to a deep sense of purpose and meaning through word and image, language and tradition, stories and activism, and education and scholarship. Highlights of Winter quarter will include a three day Lunar New Year and Tai Ji celebration and Community Service work in areas of students’ interests.  Hirsh Diamant Nancy Parkes Mon Wed Sat Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Emily Lardner
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall Evergreen students are expected to demonstrate integrative, independent, and critical thinking—that's one of the six expectations for graduates. Most often, students demonstrate their thinking in writing. The purpose of this course is to help you develop skills as a writer and thinker in academic programs across the curriculum. We will focus on critical components of academic writing, including skills related to working with ideas found in other writers' texts, whether those texts are books or articles or take some other form. We will explore preconceptions you have about what good writers do, investigate conventions for writing across academic fields, and practice a lot of writing. All levels welcome. Emily Lardner Mon Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Paul McCreary, Linda Gaffney, Carl Waluconis, Frances Solomon, Suzanne Simons, Arlen Speights, Barbara Laners, Peter Bacho, Jose Gomez, Gilda Sheppard and Tyrus Smith
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day and Evening F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This year’s program takes a holistic approach to systemic change at the community level. Students will explore the roles and responsibilities of citizens in a representative democracy. We will focus on individual- and community-building practices based on literacy in humanities, social sciences, mathematics, science, media and technology. A major emphasis of this program will be the examination of how citizens effectively advocate and engage in activism to address pressing social, legal, economic and ecological problems. Students will be expected to demonstrate understanding, action and leadership in their areas of interest.During fall quarter, students will study historical notions of leadership and strategies employed to achieve social change through activism and advocacy in institutional and non-institutional settings. Students will reflect on their personal experiences and the world around them in order to understand how they may apply the insights, knowledge and skills to promote civic engagement and foster change.Winter's work will be based upon the foundations built in fall quarter. Students will identify, develop and explore models of advocacy and activism that have led to systemic change. They will enhance their knowledge of contemporary social movements, political interest groups, and scientific and legal advocacy. Students will work actively toward the application of this knowledge by developing collaborative action research projects.In spring quarter, students will join theory with practice, utilizing a variety of expansive methods, from writing to media, in order to demonstrate and communicate their perceptions and findings to a wider audience. They will present their collaborative research projects to the public. The information presented will be directed toward benefiting individual and community capacity as well as communicating a wider understanding of their findings to enhance their own lives, the lives of those in their community and the world that we all share. Paul McCreary Linda Gaffney Carl Waluconis Frances Solomon Suzanne Simons Arlen Speights Barbara Laners Peter Bacho Jose Gomez Gilda Sheppard Tyrus Smith Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Terry Ford
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su 14Summer Full While children's literature meets the developmental needs of children grades K-6, adolescent literature  meets the developmental needs of middle and high school ages (grades 6-12).  Participants will learn about adolescent literature in an historical perspective, young adult development in reading, and genres with representative authors and selection criteria.  Participants will read and critique a variety of genres, developing a knowledge base of a variety of current authors, themes, and classroom uses.  Course credits contribute to minimum coursework expectations for teaching endorsements in middle level humanities and secondary English/Language Arts. Terry Ford Mon Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Zoltan Grossman and Kristina Ackley
Signature Required: Winter 
  Program FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter Students will explore the juxtaposed themes of Frontier and Homeland, Empire and Periphery and the Indigenous and Immigrant experience. We will use historical analysis (changes in time) and geographic analysis (changes in place) to critique these themes, and will turn toward cultural analysis for a deeper understanding of race, nation, class and gender. We will take as our starting point a critique of Frederick Jackson Turner’s “Frontier Thesis”—that the frontier is "the meeting point between savagery and civilization"—as a racist rationale for the colonization of Native American homelands. We will consider alternative histories of Anglo-American expansion and settlement in North America, with interaction, change, and persistence as our unifying themes.We will study how place and connection is nurtured, re-imagined and interpreted, particularly in Indigenous and recent immigrant communities. We will connect between the ongoing process of "Manifest Destiny" in North America and subsequent overseas imperial expansion into Latin America, the Pacific and beyond. The colonial control of domestic homelands and imperial control of foreign homelands are both highlighted in recent patterns of recent immigration. These patterns involve many "immigrants" who are in fact indigenous to the Americas, as well as immigrants from countries once conquered by the U.S. military. The American Empire, it seems, began at home and its effects are coming back home and will be contested again.In fall quarter, we will track the historical progression of the frontier across North America and overseas and the territorial and cultural clashes of immigrant and colonized peoples. We will hear firsthand the life stories of local individuals and communities to understand their narratives of conflict, assimilation, resistance and survival. In the winter quarter, we will look at contemporary case studies that show the imprint of the past in the present and how 21st-century North American communities (particularly in the Pacific Northwest) are wrestling with the legacies of colonization, imperialism and migration. In particular, we will examine the overlapping experiences of Native Americans and recent immigrants, and Indigenous territories and migrations that transgress or straddle the international border as defined by "Homeland Security. This program offers ideal opportunities for students to develop skills in writing, research, and analysis. Zoltan Grossman Kristina Ackley Tue Wed Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Fall Fall Winter
Kristina Ackley and Zoltan Grossman
  Program FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day S 14Spring Students will explore the juxtaposed themes of Frontier and Homeland, Empire and Periphery and the Indigenous and Immigrant experience. We will use historical analysis (changes in time) and geographic analysis (changes in place) to critique these themes, and will turn toward cultural analysis for a deeper understanding of race, nation, class and gender. We will take as our starting point a critique of Frederick Jackson Turner’s “Frontier Thesis”—that the frontier is "the meeting point between savagery and civilization"—as a racist rationale for the colonization of Native American homelands. We will consider alternative histories of Anglo-American expansion and settlement in North America, with interaction, change, and persistence as our unifying themes.We will study how place and connection is nurtured, re-imagined and interpreted, particularly in Indigenous and recent immigrant communities. We will connect between the ongoing process of "Manifest Destiny" in North America and subsequent overseas imperial expansion into Latin America, the Pacific and beyond. The colonial control of domestic homelands and imperial control of foreign homelands are both highlighted in recent patterns of recent immigration. These patterns involve many "immigrants" who are in fact indigenous to the Americas, as well as immigrants from countries once conquered by the U.S. military. The American Empire, it seems, began at home and its effects are coming back home and will be contested again.We will track the historical progression of the frontier across North America and overseas and the territorial and cultural clashes of immigrant and colonized peoples. We will hear firsthand the life stories of local individuals and communities to understand their narratives of conflict, assimilation, resistance and survival. In particular, we will examine the overlapping experiences of Native Americans and recent immigrants, and Indigenous territories and migrations that transgress or straddle the international border as defined by Homeland Security. This program offers ideal opportunities for students to develop foundational skills in writing, research, and analysis. Kristina Ackley Zoltan Grossman Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Spring Spring
Hirsh Diamant
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall All children enjoy singing, painting, and dancing, yet as we grow up this natural ability becomes suppressed and often lost.  This sequence of courses will reach out to the inner child in students and provide opportunities to support children in need of care and education in the community. Lectures, studio arts, research, field trips and volunteer work with children in the community will develop students’ competency as artists, parents, and educators. The course will examine practices of self-cultivation from Eastern and Western perspectives. The fall course is designed with a focus on children of preschool age.  Courses in winter and spring will focus on the elementary years and allow students to pursue further projects.Credit will be awarded in arts and human development. Hirsh Diamant Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Hirsh Diamant
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening W 14Winter All children enjoy singing, painting, and dancing, yet as we grow up this natural ability becomes suppressed and often lost.  This sequence of courses will reach out to the inner child in students and provide opportunities to support children in need of care and education in the community. Lectures, studio arts, research, field trips and volunteer work with children in the community will develop students’ competency as artists, parents, and educators. The course will examine practices of self-cultivation from Eastern and Western perspectives. The winter course is designed with a focus on children in their elementary years.  An additional course in spring will allow students to pursue further projects.Credit will be awarded in arts and human development. Hirsh Diamant Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Hirsh Diamant
  SOS FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening S 14Spring This opportunity for student-originated studies is designed for students who have taken one or both of the courses in fall and winter quarters and wish to further pursue the topics of those courses.  In the first week of the quarter, each student will submit their project proposal and then complete that project during the quarter. This proposal will be designed with input from the faculty member.All students will also participate in readings, classes, and on-line assignments in collaboration with other students.  A weekly class meeting will include seminars, workshops, and opportunities to share learning and project work.  Weekly on-line posts will highlight students' progress and learning. Students must attend and participate in all weekly sessions. Hirsh Diamant Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Rebecca Chamberlain
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day, Evening and Weekend Su 14Summer Session II This class is focused on fieldwork and activities designed for amateur astronomers and those interested in inquiry-based science education, as well as those interested in exploring mythology, archeo-astronomy, literature, philosophy, history, and cosmological traditions.   Students will participate in a variety of activities from telling star-stories under the night sky to working in a computer lab to create educational planetarium programs. We will employ qualitative and quantitative methods of observation, investigation, hands-on activities, and strategies that foster inquiry based learning and engage the imagination. Through readings, lectures, films, workshops, and discussions, participants will deepen their understanding of the principles of astronomy and refine their understanding of the role that cosmology plays in our lives through the stories we tell, the observations we make, and the questions we ask. We will participate in field studies at the Oregon Star Party as we develop our observation skills, learn to use binoculars, star-maps, and navigation guides to identify objects in the night sky, and operate 8” and 10” Dobsonian telescopes to find deep space objects. We will camp in the desert and do fieldwork for a week. Rebecca Chamberlain Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Yvonne Peterson, Michelle Aguilar-Wells and Gary Peterson
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring How does a group of indigenous people from different countries: (1) create an activity to reclaim ancient knowledge? (2) develop communication strategies in the 21 century to build a foundation to support gatherings numbering in the thousands? (3) relate tribal governance/rights to state agreements and understandings? (4) appraise economic impacts on local/regional economies when a Tribe hosts a canoe journey destination? and, (5) how does one move to allyship with indigenous people and begin preparation for the historic journey from coastal villages of Northwest Washington to Bella Bella in British Columbia, Canada? Evergreen has a history of providing community service coordinated with the Center for Community-Based Learning and Action (CCBLA) to Tribes during the canoe journeys. This program expands the venture by researching the canoe journey movement, understanding Treaty rights and sovereignty, economic justice, cultural preservation, and the social economic, political and cultural issues for present day Tribes participating in the 2014 canoe journey to Bella Bella. As a learning community, we’ll pose essential questions and research the contemporary phenomenon of the tribal canoe journeys to get acquainted with Tribes and Canoe Families and the historic cultural protocol to understand Native cultural revitalization in the Pacific Northwest and British Columbia.Upper-division students will have the option to engage in service learning volunteer projects and program internships during winter and spring quarters. All students will participate in orientation(s) to the program theme and issues, historic and political frameworks, and work respectfully with communities and organizations. Participation in this program means practicing accountability to the learning community and to other communities, interacting as a respectful guest with other cultures, and engaging in constant communication with co-learners. Yvonne Peterson Michelle Aguilar-Wells Gary Peterson Mon Tue Wed Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Yvonne Peterson
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day W 14Winter Johnson Charles, Jr., Lower Elwha Klallam This program is intended for students wishing to analyze a modern day dilemma: American Indians have standing in their land, cultural protocols, and legal relationships with the U.S. Government; the State of Washington wants/needs to repair a bridge and provide jobs; and local community people plan to develop a waterfront. Students will use the text , related print/non-print documents, the case study and interview WSDOT employees and Lower Elwha Klallam tribal members to formulate cross-cultural communication models. Students will build an academic foundation in law and public policy as they move from theory to praxis using the following texts: , , and . We are interested in providing an environment of collaboration in which faculty and learners will ask essential questions, identify topics of mutual interest and act as partners in the exploration of those topics. Learners will be exposed to research methods, the politics of ethnographic research, interview techniques, writing workshops, and educational technology. Students will effectively use Bloom’s Taxonomy, develop essential questions, and commit to Paul’s 35 Elements of Critical Thinking. Students will also use the expectations of an Evergreen graduate and the five foci as a guide to their development.  Students will have the opportunity to improve their skills in self- and group-motivation as well as communication (including dialogue, email, resources on the Web and our moodle site).Students (in groups) will propose, undertake and evaluate a three-week ethnographic interview project to understand how student groups have formed on campus and the politics of their existence. Students will present their academic project during week ten. Yvonne Peterson Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Jon Davies
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su 14Summer Session II To understand the field of children’s literature, participants will engage in readings, discussions, written analyses, and workshops that will address literary and informational texts for children from birth to age 12. Topics include an examination of picture and chapter books, multicultural literature, literature in a variety of genres, non-fiction texts across a range of subjects, introducing literature into elementary classrooms, and censorship. : For members of the class who are licensed teachers or who intend to become licensed teachers, The Evergreen State College offers this course as one of five courses that leads to a Washington State reading endorsement. The other courses are Instructional Methods in Literacy and Assessment in Literacy (offered in summer 2014) and Foundations of Literacy and Research in Literacy (offered in summer 2015).  Jon Davies Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
George Freeman and Terry Ford
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring In 1949, clinical psychologists defined a model of graduate training called The Boulder Model, also known as the scientist-practitioner model. The model asks that students' training include research and clinical skills to make more informed and evidence-based decisions regarding treatment. Using this model of the scientist-practitioner, students will co-design a course of study in clinical psychology. The intention of this program is to prepare students at the levels of theory and practice for further study and work in the fields of education and human services. Each quarter will examine multicultural themes regarding race, gender, sexual orientation, class, religious identity and ability/disability. Students will be required to begin a two-quarter long, 15 hour/week internship winter quarter in the fields of education and social services. Constructing a research project may be an option if students prefer research to the internship. Fall quarter, students will engage in a study of the history and systems of psychology and its application to clinical settings and schooling, quantitative and qualitative research methods, multicultural studies and investigate regionally-based internships in preparation for winter and spring quarter placements. Winter quarter's focus on personality theory and psychopathology establishes the two foundational areas of study particular to clinical and counseling psychology and applied settings such as educational settings. We will examine the Three Forces of psychology: psychodynamic theory, behaviorism and humanistic psychology. Students will also begin their self-identified internships for winter and spring quarters in an area of the social services or an educational setting. These theories will serve to inform the experience of the internships and anchor students' practical learning in the latest findings and theories. Students may opt for independent literature-based reviews with faculty approval.Our final quarter will be dedicated to an exploration of theory to practice through communication skills practicum and graduate and employment opportunities. Students will continue their internships started winter quarter through spring quarter.Variable credit options are available to students participating in internships. George Freeman Terry Ford Mon Tue Fri Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Frances V. Rains
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening S 14Spring For beginning and returning students, this 4-credit class is designed to strengthen your skills of critical thinking and learning across significant differences.  Through readings, seminar discussions, lectures, workshops and student leadership, students will enhance personal engagement with learning, launch their own Academic Statement, and hone skills of self evaluation, as well as experience different types of written assignments.   Frances V. Rains Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Frances V. Rains
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening W 14Winter For beginning and returning students, this 4-credit class is designed to strengthen your skills of critical thinking and learning across significant differences.  Through readings, seminar discussions, lectures, workshops and student leadership, students will enhance personal engagement with learning, launch their own Academic Statement, and hone skills of self evaluation, as well as experience different types of written assignments.   Frances V. Rains Tue Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Sandra Yannone
Signature Required: Spring 
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Day S 14Spring This course combines a seminar with a practicum to prepare students to become peer tutors at Evergreen's Writing Center on the Olympia campus. In seminar, we will explore tutoring theories, examine the role of a peer tutor and develop effective tutoring practices. In the practicum, students will observe peer tutoring and graduate to supervised tutoring. The course also will address working with unique populations of learners. Students considering graduate school in related fields will benefit from this course. Sandra Yannone Mon Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Emily Lardner and Allen Mauney
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Evening W 14Winter S 14Spring The skills to design and conduct effective research—defined as systematic inquiry-- are essential components of a liberal arts education and professional work. In this program, students will develop strong writing, critical reading, and statistical reasoning skills applicable to a variety of fields. The program is organized around two core assumptions: first, that research is more about thinking than doing, and second, that good research uses appropriate methods to support claims and communicate results effectively. In winter quarter, we will use the broad topic of climate change—understanding it, preparing for it, and adapting to it—as a shared focus for developing research skills. Students will focus on aspects of climate change that connect with their previous and future studies, or their current interests. Students will build skills through active-learning workshops, hands-on data collection and analysis, and critical analysis of online and print media reports. We will discuss research articles from a variety of fields, noting what makes some articles effective and others less so. In the second quarter of the program, students will be invited to identify their own topics for investigation, and continue to develop research tools and methods.The goal of the program is to help students become good researchers—good at asking and answering questions about complex topics in systematic ways. We expect that students will come to the program with a variety of backgrounds—from little or no experience with quantitative reasoning and statistics to some background, and from limited writing experience to lots of it. Successful students in this program will be intellectually curious and keen to become better at asking and answering good questions.   Emily Lardner Allen Mauney Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter Spring
Grace Huerta and Leslie Flemmer
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter Are educators challenged to meet the needs of diverse learners in the public schools? While scholars generate research to illuminate the lived experiences of marginalized students, why are such findings missing from educational policy, curriculum development and teacher practice today? As we strive to make connections between critical race theory and schooling, we argue that the voices of diverse populations are necessary for a thorough analysis of the educational system.In order to pursue these essential questions, our program will interrogate how dominant theories of learning and knowledge are often legitimized without regard for race, class, culture and gender. Critical race theory (CRT) provides a framework to consider multiple perspectives specific to history, diaspora, language and power. Through these perspectives, we will analyze diverse ways of knowing that inform new systems of educational policy and teacher praxis. This work will be useful for those students considering graduate school in educational policy, qualitative research and teacher preparation.Through the fall and winter, we will practice qualitative methods to describe and analyze diverse perspectives through our community service in the schools and field research. Student teams will conduct their own project and learn how to: 1) identify a research problem and question; 2) select qualitative research methods (i.e. participant observation, counter-narratives and oral history) to answer their question and prepare a human subjects application; 3) complete a literature review; 4) collect, code and analyze data; and, lastly; 5) write and present their research findings to targeted audiences.Over the course of this program, students will develop analytical skills to identify how CRT frameworks inform institutional practices. Program participants will meet with educators, advocates and students to analyze the various theories at play in various sites of study, as well as in the classroom. In order to demonstrate their understanding of CRT and qualitative research, students will complete a formal paper for possible conference submission, a policy brief or grant proposal, and recommendations to present to community stakeholders. Grace Huerta Leslie Flemmer Mon Tue Thu Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Bill Arney
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day W 14Winter —T. S. Eliot, “Two Choruses from the Rock” Education is not schooling. Schooling is for fish and maybe for getting a job. Life is not living. Living is what you have to make or, to some, everything that happens between birthing and dying. What could “Education for Life” mean? We’ll read some sages, all of them our contemporaries, who seem to have wisdom enough to offer an answer. Annie Dillard muses on God that, “Sometimes, en route, dazzlingly or dimly, he shows an edge of himself to souls who seek him, and the people who bear those souls, marveling, know it, and see the skies carousing around them, and watch cells stream and multiply in green leaves.”  We’ll see where comes from and where it leads.  Alain de Botton says it is possible to build new institutions to “generate feelings of community,” “promote kindness,” to help us “surrender some of our counterproductive optimism,” to “achieve perspective through the sublime and the transcendent,” and to do it without ethical codes, religions, morality and all the other trump cards that, while they might help us live, distract us from life. We’ll see. Wendell Berry believes that we can disentangle ourselves from a science that tells us everything worth knowing about a world that is one grand mechanism or, more recently, a total system, and from an economy where value means only price. He thinks we can recover the old virtues of living together not on the Earth but on the land and must do so “motivated by affection, by such love for a place and life that [we] want to preserve it and remain in it.” We’ll see. Charles Bowden asks, “How can a person live a moral life in a culture of death?,” and answers, by saying Yes to all of life.  There are other sages who might help us claw our way back up T. S. Eliot’s slippery slope to our future. We’ll find some. Bill Arney Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Terry Ford
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su 14Summer Session I Given the increasing number of students for whom English is not their first language and the impact of language acquisition on the ability of students to benefit from classroom learning opportunities, potential teachers need a solid understanding of language acquisition and its impact on learning. This class will focus on the processes, principles, and factors, as well as the similarities and differences of first and second language acquisition.  Focus will also be contextualized to classroom teaching and specific teaching practices that accommodate differing stages of language acquisition. Terry Ford Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Elizabeth Williamson
Signature Required: Fall  Winter 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This program offers Evergreen students the opportunity to co-learn with individuals incarcerated in a maximum-security institution for juvenile males. It is high stakes work that demands consistent engagement—approximately 10-12 hours a week in class and 4-6 hours a week at the institution (including travel time). The learning of students enrolled in this program fuels and is fueled by the learning of the incarcerated students.A fundamental principle of the Gateways program is that every person has talents given to them at birth and valuable experiences that can contribute to our shared learning. It is our job as human creatures to encourage each other to search out and develop our passions and gifts. These values are manifested in the practices of popular education, which will serve as both the process and the content of our work. Our goal is to create an environment in which each person becomes empowered to share their knowledge, creativity, values and goals by connecting respectfully with people from other cultural and class backgrounds. All students will wrestle with topics in diversity and social justice alongside other subjects chosen by the incarcerated students—the main feature of popular education is that it empowers those seeking education to be the local experts in shaping their own course of study.Popular education works through conscientization, the ongoing process of joining with others to give a name to socioeconomic conditions, to reflect critically on those conditions, and thereby to imagine new possibilities for living. In order to do this work successfully, students will practice learning how to meet other learners "where they are at" (literally, in order to better understand the conditions that put some of us in prisons and others in colleges). Students will also develop or hone their skills in contextualizing and analyzing socioeconomic phenomena. Most importantly, students will learn that solidarity does not mean "saving" other people or solving their problems—it means creating conditions that allow them to articulate those problems through genuine dialogue and supporting them as they work toward their own solutions.   Program participants will have the opportunity to reflect on how different individuals access and manifest their learning as they gain experience in facilitating discussions and workshops. In the process of collectively shaping the Gateways seminar, they will also learn how to organize productive meetings and work through conflict. Each quarter, students will take increasing responsibility for designing, implementing and assessing the program workshops and seminars. Throughout the year we will seek to expand our collective knowledge about various kinds of relative advantage or privilege while continually working to create a space that is welcoming and generative for all learners.High stakes community-based work requires trust, and trust requires sustained commitment. This program requires that all participants be ready to commit themselves to the program for the entire academic year. Elizabeth Williamson Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Elizabeth Williamson
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4, 8, 16 04 08 16 Day and Evening Su 14Summer Full Elizabeth Williamson Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Neal Nelson
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su 14Summer Session I This class is an introduction to both Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry suitable for teachers or others interested in gaining a deeper understanding of mathematics, mathematical proof, and the historical and conceptual evolution of geometrical ideas. The course will concentrate on problem solving and the development of mathematical skills, particularly proofs, with the goal of understanding the major conceptual developments in the history of geometry. Class activities will be primarily reading, problem solving, and discussion with lectures as needed. The course is suitable for middle and secondary math endorsements. Neal Nelson Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Emily Lardner
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening Su 14Summer Session I Emily Lardner Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Jon Davies and Zahid Shariff
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day W 14Winter By the time the First World War broke out in 1914, the imperial powers of modern Europe had radically transformed the vast majority of the societies of Asia, Africa, the Middle East and the Americas. Religious, scientific and discursive practices that legitimized colonial aspirations facilitated colonial rule imposed through military conquests, political subjugation and the exploitation of human and natural resources. How did the experiences of imperialism affect colonized societies? What effects did imperialism have on the imperialists themselves? What lasting effects of imperial subjugation continue to impact relations between the former colonial powers and postcolonial states in the 21st century?We are interested in unpacking the discursive practices of both the colonial past and the neo-colonial present. Through our study of history, literature and political economy, we will examine the ways in which European ideologies, traditions and scientific knowledge legitimized the formation of empire and continue to re-inscribe asymmetrical relations of power today under the guise of modernity, progress and global economic development.We will explore these issues through readings, lectures, films, as well as weekly papers, a well-developed research paper, and a presentation of that paper's findings to the class. Jon Davies Zahid Shariff Mon Tue Thu Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Ryo Imamura
Signature Required: Spring 
  Contract SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring This is an opportunity for sophomore, junior and senior students to create their own course of study and research, including internship, community service, and study abroad options. Before the beginning of spring quarter, interested students should submit an Individual Learning or Internship Contract to Ryo Imamura, which clearly states the work to be completed. Possible areas of study are Western psychology, Asian psychology, Buddhism, counseling, social work, cross-cultural studies, Asian-American studies, religious studies, nonprofit organizations, aging, death and dying, deep ecology and peace studies. Areas of study other than those listed above will be considered on a case-by-case basis. Ryo Imamura Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Jon Davies
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su 14Summer Session I To understand literacy instructional methods, participants will engage in readings, discussions, written analyses, and workshops that address research-based instructional practices. Topics address reading, writing and oral language strategies to support K-12 students, including English language learners and students with learning disabilities. : For members of the class who are licensed teachers or who intend to become licensed teachers, The Evergreen State College offers this course as one of five courses that leads to a Washington State reading endorsement. The other courses are Assessment in Literacy (offered in summer 2014), Foundations of Literacy and Research in Literacy (offered in summer 2015), and Children’s Literature or Adolescent Literature (offered every summer).  Jon Davies Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Grace Huerta
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4, 16 04 16 Day S 14Spring The intent of this 16-credit program is to undergraduate students to the foundational theories, research and pedagogies specific to teaching English language learners (ELLs) in adult and K-12 classroom or international settings. Students will examine how such conditions as history, political climate, school policies and program models impact the access and quality of education ELLs receive. Students will then focus on the study of language as a system with an emphasis on three important aspects of ELL pedagogy: a) literacy development, b) academic language/content area instruction, and, c) assessment of language proficiency and performance. Students will analyze the central theories, structures and conventions presented in functional linguistics and language acquisition research. With this knowledge base, students will design literacy curriculum and instructional strategies that align with Washington’s K-12 English language development and Common Core standards and competencies, or the TESOL (Teaching of English to Speakers of Other Languages) standards for adult ELLs.Next, students will explore methods for content-area teaching (i.e. math, science, social studies) and formative and summative assessments specific to the Common Core and four language domains: listening, speaking, reading, and writing, as well as the four developmental levels of language proficiency: pre-production, beginner, intermediate and advanced. Students will also learn the principles of backward design lesson planning, analyze instructional tasks for ELLs, provide ELLs opportunities for comprehensible input (receptive language instruction) and comprehensible output (productive language instruction); and offer content-area lesson demonstrations for peer feedback. A field experience, in which students will tutor ELLs in a bilingual school setting one day a week, is a required component of the "Making Meaning" program.Lastly, students will conduct a case study in which they will interview and examine the philosophy and experiences of a professional ELL educator. By analyzing the interrelationship between language learning and communities of practice, students will consider how ELLs' sociocultural experiences influence the language acquisition process.Students taking the 4-credit option will join the rest of the program during our review of language acquisition theories and will use that knowledge to design curriculum, instructional and assessment strategies for English language learners (ELLs). Students will also explore the underlying assumptions that impact language learning and how such assumptions can be addressed through the Washington state K-12 ELL and/or TESOL (Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages) standards. Grace Huerta Mon Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Sara Sunshine Campbell
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 8 08 Day Su 14Summer Full Sara Sunshine Campbell Tue Tue Thu Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Sara Sunshine Campbell
  Course JR–SRJunior - Senior 4 04 Day Su 14Summer Session I This class focuses on the mathematical content knowledge teachers and parents need in order to teach elementary and middle school mathematics. Students will develop their content knowledge in number theory (base-ten and place value, whole number operations, fractions, fraction operations, factors and multiples, proportional reasoning) and Algebra (algebra as generalized arithmetic, algebraic manipulation, linear and non-linear functions). Through this mathematical content and an examination of the Common Core State Standards, students will develop their own mathematical thinking, reasoning, and justification skills. This program is appropriate for students who intend to enroll in The Evergreen State College Master in Teaching Program or other teacher education programs and current teachers and parents who wish to further develop their understanding of mathematics.  Sara Sunshine Campbell Tue Wed Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Michael Vavrus and Jon Davies
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall Throughout U.S. history, people have politically contested the nature and purposes of elementary and secondary education for children and youth. This program will analyze these competing perspectives on public education and the political and economic contexts in which schools exist. Therefore, we will examine public education and schools both broadly, using a macro social, political and economic lens, and narrowly, using a micro, school-level lens.Schools are a human invention with a history. As such, schools change form and adapt in response to social and political pressures. We will examine the significant political, economic and social tensions on what the term “public” in public education means. We will analyze historical patterns of U.S. schooling from political and economic perspectives. This inquiry covers the locally controlled, Protestant Christian origins of public education and its effects on our contemporary, multicultural environment. We also investigate the political and economic debates surrounding the expectations for public education to measure accountability by means of high-stakes standardized tests.At the micro level we will analyze the school as a formal institution that functions to socialize groups of children and youth into specific behaviors and roles. This school-level lens examines this socializing process by primarily focusing on the demographic characteristics of the people who make up the power structures of public schools and the dynamics of their interactions.In a collaborative learning community environment, students will gain experience in engaging in dialogue through a close reading of texts. Among the writing assignments students will have, they will have opportunities to engage in writing short but focused analytic essays. Students can expect to leave this program having developed the analytical reading and writing skills to participate in the current political and economic debates about the purposes of public education, informed by the historical patterns that have created the present climate. Michael Vavrus Jon Davies Tue Wed Thu Fri Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Candace Vogler
Signature Required: Spring 
  Course SO–SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Evening S 14Spring This 4-credit upper division course is offered for students who anticipate relationship-based careers in clinical or educational contexts.  Goals for the course are to build cognitive and experiential understanding of the function of earliest relationships in child development and to examine theories of family development and structures for 'good enough' families as a context for individual development. Students will explore their own development and families as a context for applying theories. Class work include reading response papers, a final synthesis project, active participation in large and small discussion formats, and role play activities. This is an intense reading class- success will require staying current with weekly readings. Candace Vogler Wed Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Douglas Schuler
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8, 12 08 12 Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring We are surrounded with problems that aren't going away; problems that cannot be solved by individuals acting alone. At the same time, a variety of powerful barriers often stand in the way of working together successfully. And all too frequently, the institutions that are supposed to help in these matters seem either oppositional or ineffectual.How can we develop and nurture the "civic intelligence" that will help ensure our actions produce the best outcomes? What sorts of creative and, often courageous, actions, events, policies, and institutions are people devising to help meet these challenges? And how can these add up to more widespread and enduring social change? As John Robinson of UBC's Institute for Resources, Environment, and Sustainability stated, "If we can't imagine a better world, we won't get it."Social innovation helps us to create and ponder possible futures. Civic intelligence is an evolving, cross-disciplinary perspective that examines, proposes, initiates, and evaluates collective capacity for the common good. It builds on concepts from sociology and other social sciences but also intersects with most — or all — of the other disciplines including the hard sciences, education, cognitive science, the media, and the humanities. In this three quarter program we will focus our efforts — both reflective and action-oriented — on the theory and practice of social innovation and civic intelligence in which "ordinary" people begin to assume greater power and responsibility for creating a future that is more responsive to the needs of people and the planet. Throughout the program we will gain understanding and skills through collaborative projects, workshops, films, experiments, games, and group processes. All quarters will include theoretical readings and workshops. Spring quarter will also involve student projects with the goal of effecting real-world change.Students will help determine the topics for winter and spring, which may include deliberation, alternative economics, collective memory, cooperation, media, participatory design, inequality, or war and peace.Students registering for 12 credits will be working within CIRAL, the Civic Intelligence Research Action Laboratory, for 4 of their credits. CIRAL is designed to help support ongoing, student-led, collaborative projects. It is intended to foster sustained and engaged relationships with groups, organizations, movements, and institutions.  In addition to our regular meetings, these students will meet each Wednesday before class from 4:30 to 6:00.  Douglas Schuler Wed Wed Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Stephanie Kozick
  SOS SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This Student-Originated Studies program is intended for upper-level students with a background in community-based learning, and who have made arrangements to carry out a yearlong focused project within an organized community center, workshop, agency, organization or school setting. Community projects are to be carried out through internships, mentoring situations or apprenticeships that support students’ interest in community development. This program also includes a required weekly program meeting on campus that will facilitate a shared, supportive learning experience and weekly progress journal writing. The program is connected to Evergreen's Center for Community-Based Learning and Action (CCBLA), which supports learning about, engaging with and contributing to community life in the region. As such, this program benefits by the rich resource library, staff, internship suggestions and workshops offered through the Center. Students in this program will further their understanding of the concept of “community” as they engage their internship, apprenticeship or mentoring situation. The program emphasizes an asset-based model of community understanding advanced by Kretzmann and McKnight (1993). A variety of short readings from that text will become part of the weekly campus meetings. The range of academic/community work suited to this program includes: working in an official capacity as an intern with defined duties at a community agency, organization or school; working with one or more community members (elders, mentors, artists, teachers, skilled laborers, community organizers) to learn about a special line of work or skills that enriches the community as a whole; or designing a community action plan or case study aimed at problem solving a particular community challenge or need. A combination of internship and academic credit will be awarded in this program. Students may arrange an internship up to 36 hours a week for a 12-credit internship per quarter. Four academic credits will be awarded each quarter for seminar attendance and weekly progress journal writing. Students may distribute their program credits to include less than 12 credits of internship when accompanying research, reading and writing credits associated with their community work are included. During the academic year, students are required to meet as a whole group in a weekly seminar on Wednesday mornings to share successes and challenges, discuss the larger context of their projects in terms of community asset building and well-being, and discuss occasional assigned short readings that illuminate the essence of community. Students will also organize small interest/support groups to discuss issues related to their specific projects and to collaborate on a presentation at the end of each quarter. Students will submit weekly written progress/reflection reports via forums established on the program Moodle site. Contact faculty member Stephanie Kozick if further information is needed. Stephanie Kozick Wed Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Eirik Steinhoff
Signature Required: Spring 
  SOS SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring This one-quarter critical and creative reading and writing program is designed for advanced students embarked on the composition of long-range and wide-ranging writing projects oriented toward or against or beyond the emergent occasions that surround us. Intensive independent writing and reading will be complemented by weekly seminars, small-group workshops, and weekly and semi-weekly lectures ( the Critical and Cultural Lecture Series and the Art Lecture series); occasional screenings and a local field-trip are possible as well. “Language is fossil poetry,” Emerson declares. And indeed the radical sense of each term in this program’s subtitle offers substantial orientation for the various directions we might take: in the sense of “decision” or “choice”; in the sense of “making” (not only in what is called “poetry,” but also in other kinds of composition, whether in prose or verse, for the page or the stage or the screen); in the sense of “making visible”; in the sense of “action” or “doing.” All of which is to say that in addition to Emerson’s etymological enthusiasms we will be mindful withal of Wittgenstein’s no less fruitful suggestion that “the meaning of a word is its use.” An expanded engagement with the question Montaigne had emblazoned on the rafters of his study — — will guide us in our individual and collective inquiry: What do I know? And what do I do? How do I know and how do I do? How do we do? How do we know? How can we do things with words to find out? How might our writing become an instrument for conducting rigorous ethical and epistemological investigations designed to reconnect us, by means of our study (however elaborate or playful or recondite), back to the world we live in right now? Eirik Steinhoff Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Evan Blackwell
Signature Required: Spring 
  SOS JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring This program is for intermediate to advanced students who are ready for intensive full-time work in theory and practice in the visual arts. Students will design their own projects, complete visual research and write papers appropriate to their topics, share their research through presentations, work intensively in the studio together, produce a significant thematic body of work, and participate in demanding weekly critiques. The program will provide opportunities for independent work while providing a learning community of students with similar interests. Beyond art making and visual research, this program will also provide opportunities for professional development for students who are thinking of graduate school, professional work in the visual arts, visual arts internships, or arts education at any level.  visual arts, museum studies, arts administration, public art, arts organizations, art education and design. Evan Blackwell Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Marja Eloheimo
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 12 12 Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Working as a multidisciplinary project team, this year-long program has a mission. Students will engage in hands-on work to enhance the fledgling ethnobotanical garden at the Evergreen “House of Welcome” Longhouse by refining and caring for existing habitat and theme areas. Through this work, we will create a valuable educational resource and contribute to multiple communities including Evergreen, local K-12 schools, local First Nations, and a growing global collective of ethnobotanical gardens that promote environmental, medical, and cultural diversity and sustainability.During winter quarter, students will focus on the garden's "story" through continued work on existing signage, a book draft, and/or other interpretive materials such as a web page. Students will work independently on skill development, research, and project planning or implementation in their selected areas of interest and garden areas. Students will also be active during the winter transplant season and will prepare procurement and planting plans for the spring season.During spring quarter, students will plant and care for the garden, wrapping up all of the work they have begun. They will complete interpretive materials, create and implement educational activities, and participate in the Longhouse Cleansing Ceremony.Since this unique program is grounded in community-service learning, topics in various subject areas – including field botany, community-based herbalism, horticulture, and Indigenous studies – are woven into the fabric of student learning when most appropriate to overall objectives, and are introduced through readings, lectures, workshops, assignments, and projects.The program cultivates community by nurturing each member's contributions and growth, and acknowledges the broader context of sustainability, especially with regard to food and medicine.  Marja Eloheimo Sat Sun Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Gilda Sheppard and Carl Waluconis
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8, 16 08 16 Day and Evening Su 14Summer Full This program will explore the role that movement, visual art, music, and media can play in problem solving and in the resolution of internalized fear, conflicts, or blocks.  Through a variety of hands-on activities, field trips, readings, films/video, and guest speakers, students will discover sources of imagery, sound, and movement as tools to awaken their creative problem solving from two perspectives—as creator and viewer.  Students interested in human services, social sciences, media, humanities and education will find this course engaging. This course does not require any prerequisite art classes or training. Gilda Sheppard Carl Waluconis Mon Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Anthony Zaragoza
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su 14Summer Session II Anthony Zaragoza Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Steve Cifka
  Course JR–SRJunior - Senior 4 04 Evening W 14Winter Many idealistic, well-intentioned new teachers find themselves frustrated by their early experiences in public schools and soon leave public education entirely. This frustration is not inevitable. This course, taught by an Evergreen graduate with more than 30 years’ experience teaching in public schools, will explore the skills needed to become a passionate, powerful teacher in the 21st century. We will investigate some of the inevitable struggles—both political and personal—that teachers encounter in public schools today, and we will hear how passionate teachers overcome those tensions. This course may be of particular interest to upper-division students who are considering careers in education, but will also interest any student who wishes to look closely at issues in public education today. As part of this course, students who plan to apply to the Master in Teaching program can begin the classroom observations required for application. Steve Cifka Thu Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Dharshi Bopegedera
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Scientific Inquiry. Research opportunities allow science students to work on specific projects associated with faculty members’ expertise. Students typically begin by working in an apprenticeship model with faculty or laboratory staff and gradually take on more independent projects within the context of the specific research program as they gain experience. Students can develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, modeling and theoretical analysis, written and oral communication, collaboration and critical thinking. These are valuable skills for students pursuing a graduate degree or entering the job market. (chemistry) would like to engage students in two projects. (1) Quantitative determination of metals in the stalactites formed in aging concrete using ICP-MS. Students who are interested in learning about the ICP-MS technique and using it for quantitative analysis will find this project interesting. (2) Science and education. We will work with local teachers to develop lab activities that enhance the science curriculum in local schools. Students who have an interest in teaching science and who have completed general chemistry with laboratory would be ideal for this project. Dharshi Bopegedera Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Emily Lardner
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Day, Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Students who are interested in understanding the relationship between teaching and learning, including students who are interested in pursuing a career in education (at any level--from preschool through college, and in any role--from counselor to teacher to administrator) as well as students who would like to examine the principles and practices embodied in education at Evergreen, are welcome to apply to join this research group. Students will develop their abilities to identify, analyze and synthesize studies related to the research questions. Students will also have opportunities to design individual or collaborative research projects related to the group’s research questions. We will function as a collaborative research group, and our focus will be on understanding how students develop as writers at an interdisciplinary liberal arts college with no required writing classes. We will examine early studies of student writing at Evergreen and current studies of students’ development as writers at colleges across the U.S. We will also review literature on the nature of disciplinary and interdisciplinary understanding. Based on our collective review, we will develop research questions and design research studies that will allow us to probe a variety of topics including the following: Students who participate in this group for the whole year will have opportunities to develop their own research projects related to teaching and learning. Students may choose to organize their work so that it culminates in submissions to peer-reviewed national journals like Y Emily Lardner Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Emily Lardner
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Day, Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Students who are interested in understanding the relationship between teaching and learning, including students who are interested in pursuing a career in education (at any level--from preschool through college, and in any role--from counselor to teacher to administrator) as well as students who would like to examine the principles and practices embodied in education at Evergreen, are welcome to apply to join this research group. Students will develop their abilities to identify, analyze and synthesize studies related to the research questions. Students will also have opportunities to design individual or collaborative research projects related to the group’s research questions. We will function as a collaborative research group, and our focus will be on understanding how students develop as writers at an interdisciplinary liberal arts college with no required writing classes. We will examine early studies of student writing at Evergreen and current studies of students’ development as writers at colleges across the U.S. We will also review literature on the nature of disciplinary and interdisciplinary understanding. Based on our collective review, we will develop research questions and design research studies that will allow us to probe a variety of topics including the following: Students who participate in this group for the whole year will have opportunities to develop their own research projects related to teaching and learning. Students may choose to organize their work so that it culminates in submissions to peer-reviewed national journals like Y Please go to the catalog view for additional information, including the CRN. Emily Lardner Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Emily Lardner
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall Writing makes thinking visible to us and to others. In this course, we'll explore how writing and thinking are connected. We will experiment with strategies that make it easier to think in writing, as well as strategies for sharing our thinking with others. We'll do lots of low-stakes practicing, and we will study how writers in different fields present similar ideas. Students will have the opportunity to explore where they feel most at home as writers--the kinds of writing and the kinds of thinking they prefer to do, and what that means in the context of getting a liberal arts education. Writers of all experience levels are welcome. Emily Lardner Tue Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall