2013-14 Catalog

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2013-14 Undergraduate Index A-Z

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Gender And Women's Studies [clear]


Title   Offering Standing Credits Credits When F W S Su Description Preparatory Faculty Days Multiple Standings Start Quarters Open Quarters
Kabby Mitchell and Joye Hardiman
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring How did Black men and women, of many different cultures and ages, succeed against all odds? How did they move from victim to victors? Where did they find the insurmountable courage to deconstruct and reconstruct their lives? In this program, students will participate in an inquiry-base exploration of the efficacy, resiliency and longevity of the lives and legacies of selected Black men and women from Ancient Egypt to contemporary times. Our exploration will use the lenses of Ancient Egyptian studies, African, African-American and Afro-Disaporic history, dance history, media and popular culture to investigate the lives of these men and women lives, their historical, cultural and spiritual contexts and legacies.The class will have a variety of learning environments, including lectures and films, workshops, seminars and research groups. All students will demonstrate their acquired knowledge, skills and insights about the mis-education/re-education process through a quarter -long reflective journal project , a mid -quarter contextual research project;  and an end-of-the-quarter final paper and a collaborative performance about the journey from mis-education to education and those factors that allow one to retain their humanity in spite of horrific dehumanizing attempts. Kabby Mitchell Joye Hardiman Tue Tue Tue Wed Wed Wed Thu Thu Thu Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Stephanie Coontz
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Weekend S 14Spring This program explores changes in the social construction and cultural expectations of family life and intimate relations, from colonial times to the present. We begin by delving into the very different values and behaviors of colonial families and then trace changes in love, marriage, parenting, and family arrangements under the influence of the American Revolution and the spread of wage labor. We study the gender and sexual norms of the 19th century, including variation by race and class, then examine the changes pioneered in the early 20th century. We discuss the rise of the 1950s male breadwinner family and then follow its demise from the 1960s through the 1980s. We end the quarter by discussing new patterns of partnering and parenting in the past 30 years,Readings will be challenging, and there will be frequent writing assignments. All students are expected to complete all assignments and participate in workshops and seminar discussions. Credit depends upon consistent attendance and preparation and a demonstrated mastery of the subject matter.This class is excellent preparation for graduate work or professional employment in history, sociology, law, American studies, social work, and psychology. It provides needed context and background for people working in the social services or education. sociology, history, family studies, research, social work, teaching, family law and counseling. Stephanie Coontz Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Frederica Bowcutt
Signature Required: Winter 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter This two-quarter program allows students to learn introductory and advanced plant science material in an interdisciplinary format. The program is suitable for both advanced and first year students who are looking for an opportunity to expand their understanding of plants and challenge themselves. Students will learn about plant anatomy, morphology and systematics. Lectures based on textbook readings will be supplemented with laboratory work. The learning community will explore how present form and function informs us about the evolution of major groups of plants such as mosses, ferns, conifers and flowering plants. Students will get hands-on experience studying plants under microscopes and in the field. To support their work in the field and lab, students will learn how to maintain a detailed and illustrated nature journal. Instruction will be given in the history and practice of botanical illustration.A central focus of the program is people's relationships with plants for food, fiber, medicine and aesthetics. Economic botany will be studied through seminar texts, films, and lectures that examine agriculture, forestry, herbology and horticulture. Students will examine political economic factors that shape our relations with plants. Through economic and historical lenses, the learning community will inquire about why people have favored some plants and not others or radically changed their preferences, for example considering a former cash crop to be a weed. Readings will examine the significant roles botany has played in colonialism, imperialism and globalization. Students will also investigate the gender politics of botany. For example, botany was used to inculcate "appropriate" middle and upper class values among American women in the 19th century. Initiatives to foster more socially just and environmentally sustainable relations with plants will be investigated.In winter, students will write a major research paper on a plant of their choosing. Through a series of workshops, they will learn to search the scientific literature, manage bibliographic data and interpret and synthesize information, including primary sources. Through their research paper, students will synthesize scientific and cultural information about their plant. Frederica Bowcutt Mon Tue Wed Fri Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Therese Saliba and Naima Lowe
  Program FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring "Dangerous creations" emerge out of adverse political conditions and embody new creative strategies and possibilities. This program will explore how writers, media makers, artists and community activists use experimental modes of address to challenge dominant narratives and formal structures, and to confound notions of "the real." With an emphasis on multiculturalism, identity and especially African and Arab Diasporas, this program will examine the histories of slavery, colonialism and Empire and how art, media and literature have been used as tools of both conquest and resistance. We will draw on theoretical tools  to analyze the "politics of representation" in popular media, including critiques of Orientalism, the Africanist presence and the gaze. And we will explore how diasporic communities, particularly feminists of color, "talk back" to these representations—by creating dangerously. That is, how do these artists use experimental forms to challenge fixed notions of individual and communal identity, as well as the consumerist system of media and literary production?Through the study of diasporic cultural production, African and Arab American literature and film, Third World Cinema and queer and feminist film theory, we intend to foster critical thinking about race, class and gender identities, and how they are negotiated. We will also explore how certain models of cultural-mixing, hybridity, and border-crossing have created a dispersal of identities and strategic possibilities for solidarities and connections across community struggles.In fall and winter quarters, students will learn to read cultural texts, including film, visual art and literature, to understand the relationships of people and communities, their sense of identity and possibilities for solidarity across differences. Students will develop skills in visual and media literacy, creative and expository writing, analytical reading and viewing, literary analysis, and the terminologies and methodologies of cultural and gender studies, film history and theory. Through workshops, students will also learn a range of community documentation skills, including photography, video, interviewing and oral history. In spring, students will have the opportunity to work on in-depth independent projects in autobiographical representations either through moving image or narrative writing. With faculty guidance and small group workshops, students will write proposals, conduct research and engage in critique groups to produce a major individual or colloborative creation.  visual studies, film studies, cultural studies, literary studies, African-American studies, Arab/Middle East studies, gender studies, community organizing and advocacy, and education. Therese Saliba Naima Lowe Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Fall Fall Winter
Naima Lowe and Therese Saliba
Signature Required: Fall  Winter 
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day and Evening F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This is an opportunity for a small number of Junior-Senior students with a strong background in one or a combination of the following: visual art, art history, literature, creative writing, media theory, cultural studies, critical race studies, or feminist studies. Students with this background will participate in all of the activities and readings of , but also be asked to complete longer and more in-depth assignments and a large-scale project that will be developed over the course of the year. These students will also act as peer mentors for the Freshman-Sophomore students in the class, and will have opportunities for ongoing critique on projects with program faculty. In addition, advanced students will be required to take a year-long, 2-credit sequence in Critical and Cultural Theory offered one evening a week by Greg Mullins. Naima Lowe Therese Saliba Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Barbara Laners
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 14Summer Full This class will examine the role of women of color in the development of America's social, economic, legal, and political history. It will focus on issues ranging from suffrage to the civil rights movement and beyond; all aspects of the gender/racial gap in those spheres will be explored. Barbara Laners Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Grace Huerta and Leslie Flemmer
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter Are educators challenged to meet the needs of diverse learners in the public schools? While scholars generate research to illuminate the lived experiences of marginalized students, why are such findings missing from educational policy, curriculum development and teacher practice today? As we strive to make connections between critical race theory and schooling, we argue that the voices of diverse populations are necessary for a thorough analysis of the educational system.In order to pursue these essential questions, our program will interrogate how dominant theories of learning and knowledge are often legitimized without regard for race, class, culture and gender. Critical race theory (CRT) provides a framework to consider multiple perspectives specific to history, diaspora, language and power. Through these perspectives, we will analyze diverse ways of knowing that inform new systems of educational policy and teacher praxis. This work will be useful for those students considering graduate school in educational policy, qualitative research and teacher preparation.Through the fall and winter, we will practice qualitative methods to describe and analyze diverse perspectives through our community service in the schools and field research. Student teams will conduct their own project and learn how to: 1) identify a research problem and question; 2) select qualitative research methods (i.e. participant observation, counter-narratives and oral history) to answer their question and prepare a human subjects application; 3) complete a literature review; 4) collect, code and analyze data; and, lastly; 5) write and present their research findings to targeted audiences.Over the course of this program, students will develop analytical skills to identify how CRT frameworks inform institutional practices. Program participants will meet with educators, advocates and students to analyze the various theories at play in various sites of study, as well as in the classroom. In order to demonstrate their understanding of CRT and qualitative research, students will complete a formal paper for possible conference submission, a policy brief or grant proposal, and recommendations to present to community stakeholders. Grace Huerta Leslie Flemmer Mon Tue Thu Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Cheri Lucas-Jennings
Signature Required: Fall 
  Contract SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day and Evening F 13 Fall Individual studies offers important opportunities for advanced students to create their own course of study and research. Prior to the beginning of the quarter, interested individuals or small groups of students must consult with the faculty sponsor to develop an outline of proposed projects to be described in an Individual Learning Contract. If students wish to gain internship experience they must secure the agreement and signature of a field supervisor prior to the initiation of the internship contract.This faculty welcomes internships and contracts in the areas of the arts (including acrylic and oil painting, sculpture, or textiles); water policy and hydrolic systems; environmental health; health policy; public law; cultural studies; ethnic studies; permaculture, economics of agriculture; toxins and brownfields; community planning, intranational relations.This opportunity is open to those who wish to continue with applied projects that seek to create social change in our community; artists engaged in creative projects and those begining internship work at the State capitol who seek to expand their experience to public agencies and non-profit institutions; and to those interested in the study of low income populations and legal aid.  Cheri Lucas-Jennings Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Laura Citrin and Anne de Marcken (Forbes)
Signature Required: Winter 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter What are emotions, sentiments, and feelings? What functions do they serve, both for the individual and for society? In this full-time, two-quarter program, we will use social pyschology, scientific research, creative writing, and literary and film analysis as methods of inquiry into the ways that emotions are connected with cultural ideologies and assumptions. We will study the ways emotions are expressed, avoided, embraced, and rejected according to complex display rules that vary across and within cultures based on gendered, raced, and classed social norms. Underlying all of this discussion will be an analysis of the ways that power operates on and through us to get under our skin and into what feels like our most personal possessions: our emotions. If we read between the lines, what is the subtext of our cultural narratives about fear, love, guilt, anger…? We will look to literature and film for examples of dominant and alternative narratives, and we will experiment with creative writing—fiction, nonfiction, and hybrid forms—as both a mode of expression and a method of inquiry: a way of looking under the surface of our habitual reactions and cultural norms.Fall QuarterWe'll survey the "big six" emotions: anger, sadness, happiness, disgust, surprise and fear, as well as the socio-moral emotions like embarrassment, contempt, shame, and pride. We will also discuss the field of positive psychology and its analysis of the positive emotions (e.g., joy, hope, interest, love) and the role they play in what positive psychologists refer to as "the good life."  We will consider published psychology research and literature from the field of social psychology, and students will design, propose and lay the groundwork for Winter Quarter research projects. Through analysis of films and literary and critical texts, students will consider how stories convey, evoke, and manipulate our emotions. They will develop fluency with critical terminology and concepts related to narrative, literary and cinematic theories. Through creative writing assignments and workshops, students will cultivate facility with elements of narrative discourse such as scene, summary, description, exposition, and dialogue.Winter QuarterOur interrogation of emotions will continue winter quarter with greater focus on independent, in-depth, and finely-crafted work. In addition to continued reading, screening and discussion of literary, critical and research-based texts, students will conduct the primary research projects approved during Fall Quarter, and will work to develop a portfolio of creative work representative of their inquiry. Winter quarter is an opportunity to participate first-hand in knowledge production within the interdisciplinary domain of affect studies, and to engage directly in the contemporary critical/creative discourse as art-makers.The interrogation of emotions in this program will occur via readings, screenings, lectures, research and creative writing workshops, and student-led seminars. Designed as a two-quarter program, the Fall Quarter will lay the foundation for more in-depth work in Winter. We strongly encourage students to enroll who are interested in sustained inquiry. Laura Citrin Anne de Marcken (Forbes) Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Trevor Speller
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 14Summer Session I It seems that contemporary audiences cannot get enough Jane Austen. Some two hundred years after her novels were written, they continue to be filmed, adapted, and discussed. Why do we keep rewriting Austen’s work? How should we understand what Austen had to say about mating, marriage, and material success? How should we understand what she had to say about women and writing? How do we maintain those values in our society – and what might that mean for us?   To answer these questions, we will read Austen’s novels alongside contemporary interpretations of her work. For example, students will compare with  or  with  , or  with  , all the while considering the impact of Jane Austen on our contemporary culture.   Trevor Speller Tue Wed Thu Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Alice Nelson
  Program FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day S 14Spring In recent decades, Latin America has become well known beyond its borders for compelling, politically urgent and aesthetically vibrant literary works. Contemporary writings by Latin American women, increasingly available in English translation, challenge preconceptions about gender and sexuality in the region, while also addressing critical issues of politically motivated violence, collective memory, intersecting oppressions, language, spirituality, democratization and social change. This program seeks to foster greater understanding of the region and its diverse peoples and perspectives. Writers will include Gloria Anzaldúa (U.S.), Rosario Castellanos (Mexico), Ana Lydia Vega (Puerto Rico), Rigoberta Menchú (Guatemala), Daisy Zamora (Nicaragua), Conceição Evaristo (Brazil), Cristina Peri Rossi (Uruguay), Luisa Valenzuela (Argentina) and Pía Barros (Chile), among many others.We will read novels, poetry, short stories and testimonials by Latin American (indigenous, mestiza, Afro-Latina) women writers, focusing on legacies of colonialism, authoritarianism and neoliberalism, as well as projects for contesting recent histories. We will situate our literary analysis within the historical and political events that shape Latin American women’s texts, and examine their critique of masculinist narratives that justify domination and exclude women’s voices. We will also view films by and about women, and examine women's and feminist movements in the region. Students will write literary analyses and some creative work, and will conduct research on a writer of their choice. Through this study, students will consider the impact of political, economic and cultural forces on Latin American women's lives and literary production, while also examining literary and film representations as sites of resistance. Alice Nelson Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Spring Spring
Alice Nelson
Signature Required: Spring 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring This is an opportunity for a small number of advanced students with a strong background in one or a combination of the following: Latin American or postcolonial studies, feminist or gender studies, literature, creative writing, film studies, or critical race studies. Students with this background will participate in all of the activities and readings of the program, but also be asked to complete longer and more in-depth assignments and a larger-scale project developed over the course of the quarter.  Alice Nelson Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Andrew Buchman and Ratna Roy
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring We will focus on the dance and music culture of central eastern India, specifically the art-rich state of Orissa. While some music or dance background would be useful, it is not necessary. This is a culture and history offering, along with some practical hands-on experience in dance and music. We will immerse ourselves in both the history and sources of this ancient culture of dance and music, and its active contemporary scene. Our readings will include cutting-edge articles and book chapters exploring themes such as gender, colonial history and post-colonial theory and the economic ferment that is transforming many aspects of Indian society today. In seminars, we'll compare and contrast ancient and modern, Indian and American aesthetics, world views, values and attitudes. In workshops, we will explore the rich vocabularies of sound and movement that make Orissa's traditional performing arts so rewarding to study. The music workshop will focus on modal improvisation, performance, and composition, and study contemporary improvisational musicians influenced by South Asian aesthetics, like Vijay Iyer and John Coltrane, as well as traditionally trained musicians with multiple musical careers, such as Ravi Shankar.  The dance workshop will focus on classical Odissi dance, technique and repertoire.The first evidence of Orissa's dance and music culture is preserved in sculptures and images that are about 2,000 years old. The culture thrived for centuries before it declined under colonial rule in the 1800s, and began to revive in the 1950s and 60s after India became an independent nation-state. This revival still continues, and we will be a part of that effort. Dancers, musicians and scholars will work together and re-create the tradition for our own times. At the end of the quarter, we will present a performance incorporating music and dance from Orissa at various levels of skill so that most students can participate.Some previous training in dance or music would be useful, but is not expected. Students who don't wish to focus on music or dance performance can pursue a research option, in consultation with faculty. Andrew Buchman Ratna Roy Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring Ready Camera One investigates the politics of representation. Therefore, students who choose to enroll should be vitally and sincerely interested in the issues and ideas concerning the representation of gender, race, ethnicity, class and sexual orientation in the mass media. Ready Camera One’s focus on gender and identity in American television will be explored in a research project called INTO FOCUS that will combine media research, critical writing, a visual essay, and an oral presentation.This program is also designed for students interested in exploring visual literacy, television production, performance, and media criticism. Students will be introduced to both media deconstruction and media production skills through a series of lecture/screenings as well as workshops and design problems that focus primarily on collaborative multi-camera studio production. In addition to a series of studio exercises, students will complete a collaborative final project that combines media analysis, research, performance and production about broadcast content and ideology.We will take a critical, performative and historical approach as we examine and even emulate the production style and lessons from the early history of 20th century live television as well as more contemporary models. Students will be expected to perform in front of as well as behind the camera and will explore the logistics and aesthetics of multi-camera direction and design. Activities will include training in the CCAM, a multi-camera TV studio facility, instruction in basic performance and writing for television, and an immersive production schedule that requires a professional attitude including perfect attendance and timeliness.No prior media production experience is required. However, Ready Camera One is also an excellent opportunity for students who do have experience in the performing arts or media arts to explore intensive studio production and collaboration. Sally Cloninger Tue Thu Fri Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Tom Womeldorff, Catalina Ocampo and Alice Nelson
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day W 14Winter The recent history of Latin America can be described as a struggle for self-determination, from the wars of independence to the present-day unequal footing in the world economic system. Taking Mexico as a case study, we will explore how questions of self-determination have shaped Latin America and the lives of the various communities that constitute the region. We will focus, in particular, on the different roles that culture, politics, and economics have played in struggles for self-determination and investigate the tensions and symbioses between them. We will ask ourselves: What roles do culture and economics play as tools of self-determination? How can culture facilitate processes of self-determination at moments when political or economic self-determination is not possible? What are the limitations on the use of culture when one has limited political and economic self-determination? What role do third parties play in struggles for self-determination and how do we situate ourselves with regards to various processes of self-determination in Latin America?Our study of various groups and communities within Mexico and across its borders to the north and to the south will illuminate the country’s diversity, while also highlighting the connections between personal, national, and regional politics in Latin America. We will explore how self-determination is manifested in relationships of class, gender and ethnicity and study the specific ways in which struggles for self-determination have emerged in Mexico from the nineteenth century to the present. We will focus on various historical moments and issues including nation-building efforts and conflicts with the United States in the nineteenth century; issues of violence and class during the Mexican Revolution; contradictory uses of Indigenismo; popular movements and state repression in the 1960s and 70s; the emergence of the Zapatista movement; the economic impact of NAFTA; and questions of economic development and cultural identity during recent migrations to the United States.Throughout the quarter, we will engage historical and contemporary realities in Mexico using multiple frameworks from the humanities and the social sciences. In the process, we will introduce literary and cultural theory, as well as economic theories of capitalist development. Students will gain an in-depth ability to interpret literary texts in their social contexts, and to use economic models to understand specific aspects of Latin American societies. This program will involve frequent writing assignments and develop skills in visual analysis. Tom Womeldorff Catalina Ocampo Alice Nelson Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Laura Citrin and Kathleen Eamon
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring How does shame differ from disgust, guilt and embarrassment? How does shame function both socially and individually? In this program, we will pursue a set of themes and questions clustered around . We will look at attempts in social psychology, sociology, psychoanalysis, and philosophy to define shame, to differentiate it from its neighboring emotions and states, and to understand how it functions both socially and individually. We will look at both general theories and case studies, ranging from topics like morality and moralization, marginalization, bodies and shame, the social life of the emotions, feminist critiques of shame, as well as turning our attention to “counter-shame” movements like sex positivity.Our work in psychoanalysis and philosophy will likely include readings by Freud, Lacan, Donald Winnicott, Slavoj Žižek, Hannah Arendt, and Michel Foucault.  Our work in social psychology and sociology will draw from Silvan Tomkins, Erving Goffman, Michael Lewis, Thomas Scheff, June Tangney, and Susan Miller.  And we will examine at least one novel that deals thematically with shame: Alison Bechdel’s graphic memoir, We will be reading broadly in both contemporary and historical texts, engaging in seminar discussion and writing workshops, and writing reflective, expository, and research papers on shame and related phenomena throughout the quarter.Although any background in the fields of psychology or philosophy will be helpful, successful participation in the inquiry does not depend on it. However, we do recommend the program for students with some lower division experience with the humanities and/or the social sciences.  Laura Citrin Kathleen Eamon Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Sarah Williams and Martha Rosemeyer
Signature Required: Winter  Spring 
  SOS SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring J.W. Goethe Like the role of bees and seeds in the evolution of agriculture, beads—which often are seeds, shells, wax or bone—have an inside and an outside that commute.  Seeds, beads and bees are interpenetrating, reciprocal creations. They form assemblages with centers and their use over time can be a measure of the fertility of mind, spirit and body. This SOS will support students in bead-like studies of biodynamic processes in conjunction with an internship, creative practice or field research project. Whether defined in relationship to agricultural, artistic or somatic practices, biodynamic processes are characterized by interconnected, recursive and iterative movements that form holistic patterns. Thus, students will be guided to reflect on their learning itself as a biodynamic process.  To what extent is the subject and object of a liberal arts education mutually causative?  In what ways might thinking be enlivened if informed by a consciousness of temporal rhythms (e.g., respiration) and cosmic forces such as tides and sunlight?This program is ideal for responsible, enthusiastic and self-motivated students with an interest in developing and reflecting on a substantial project over a substantial period of time. In addition to classroom work, each student will create an individual course of academic learning including an internship (e.g., at a local organic farm), creative practice (e.g., nature writing), or field research project (e.g., discovering the differences—and why they matter—between commercial and biodynamic beekeeping). Collaboration, including shared field-trip opportunities, with the Ecological Agriculture and Practice of Sustainable Agriculture programs will be available. Academic work for each quarter will include weekly group meetings, an annotated bibliography and maintenance of a field journal to document independent project learning. In addition to this independent project component, students will engage in weekly readings and written responses, seminar discussions and a final presentation. Unless exceptions are designed into students' projects and agreed upon in advance, all students will be required to attend and actively participate in this one day of weekly class activities, as well as individual self-assessment meetings with the faculty at mid-quarter and the end of the quarter. Interested students should browse the following authors and texts to explore their ability to think and act biodynamically within an intentional learning community: , edited by David Seamon and Arthur Zajonc; by Wolf Storl; by Charles Ridley; by Catherine Cole; by Gary Snyder; by Robert Bringhurst; by Ruth Ozeki; and : by Rudolf Steiner Sarah Williams Martha Rosemeyer Tue Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Anthony Zaragoza
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su 14Summer Session II Anthony Zaragoza Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Naima Lowe, Shaw Osha (Flores), Kathleen Eamon and Joli Sandoz
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Day, Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This is an opportunity for students to work with faculty from a diverse set of disciplines on creative and scholarly projects. Students will come away with invaluable skills in library and archival research practices, visual arts studio practices, laboratory practices, film/media production practices, critical research and writing, and much more. Critical and Creative Practices is comprised of a diverse group of artists, theorists, scientists, mathematicians, writers, filmmakers and other cultural workers whose interdisciplinary fields of study sit at the crossroads between critical theoretical studies and creative engagement. (social and political philosophy, aesthetics, philosophy of art) has interests in German idealism (Kant and Hegel), historical materialism (Marx, 20 C Marxists, and critical theory), and psychoanalysis (Freud and Lacan). She is currently working on an unorthodox project about Kant and Freud, under the working title “States of Partial Undress: the Fantasy of Sociability.” Students working with Kathleen would have opportunities to join her in her inquiry, learn about and pursue research in the humanities, and critically respond to the project as it comes together. In addition to work in Kantian aesthetics and Freudian dream theory, the project will involve questions about futurity, individual wishes and fantasies, and the possibility of collective and progressive models of sociability and fantasy. (experimental media and performance art) creates films, videos, performances and written works that explore issues of race, gender, and embodiment. The majority of her work includes an archival research element that explores historical social relationships and mythic identities. She is currently working on a series of short films and performances that explore racial identity in rural settings. Students working with Naima would have opportunities to learn media production and post-production skills (including storyboarding, scripting, 16mm and HD video shooting, location scouting, audio recording, audio/video editing, etc) through working with a small crew comprised of students and professional artists. Students would also have opportunities to do archival and historical research on African-Americans living in rural settings, and on literature, film and visual art that deals with similar themes. (visual art) works in painting, photography, drawing, writing and video. She explores issues of visual representation, affect as a desire, social relationships and the conditions that surround us. She is currently working on a project based on questions of soul in artwork. Students working with Shaw would have opportunities to learn about artistic research, critique, grant and statement writing, website design, studio work and concerns in contemporary art making. (creative nonfiction) draws from experience and field, archival and library research to write creative essays about experiences and constructions of place, and about cultural practices of embodiment. She also experiments with juxtapositions of diagrams, images and words, including hand-drawn mapping. Students working with Joli will be able to learn their choice of: critical reading approaches to published works (reading as a writer), online and print research and associated information assessment skills, identifying publishing markets for specific pieces of writing, or discussing and responding to creative nonfiction in draft form (workshopping). Joli’s projects underway include a series of essays on place and aging; an essay on physical achievement and ambition; and a visual/word piece exploring the relationship of the local to the global. Please go to the catalog view for specific information about each option. Naima Lowe Shaw Osha (Flores) Kathleen Eamon Joli Sandoz Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Naima Lowe
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Day, Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This is an opportunity for students to work with faculty from a diverse set of disciplines on creative and scholarly projects. Students will come away with invaluable skills in library and archival research practices, visual arts studio practices, laboratory practices, film/media production practices, critical research and writing, and much more. Critical and Creative Practices is comprised of a diverse group of artists, theorists, scientists, mathematicians, writers, filmmakers and other cultural workers whose interdisciplinary fields of study sit at the crossroads between critical theoretical studies and creative engagement. (experimental media and performance art) creates films, videos, performances and written works that explore issues of race, gender, and embodiment. The majority of her work includes an archival research element that explores historical social relationships and mythic identities. She is currently working on a series of short films and performances that explore racial identity in rural settings. Students working with Naima would have opportunities to learn media production and post-production skills (including storyboarding, scripting, 16mm and HD video shooting, location scouting, audio recording, audio/video editing, etc) through working with a small crew comprised of students and professional artists. Students would also have opportunities to do archival and historical research on African-Americans living in rural settings, and on literature, film and visual art that deals with similar themes. Naima Lowe Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Anthony Zaragoza and Savvina Chowdhury
  Program FR ONLYFreshmen Only 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Political economy asks basic but often overlooked questions: who has what, who does what work, why, how it got to be that way and how to change it. Given this starting point, what do some of the most basic and everyday things around us look like through the lens of political economy? How could we better understand our food system, popular culture and social movements using this interdisciplinary set of questions and perspectives? For example, we'll look at how apples are grown and harvested, , and what's grown out of the Occupy Movement, each as its own window into the way the economic system we were born into works, and how people just like us are responding to it and trying to remake the world. Through these explorations of food systems, popular culture and social movements, we will get a better understanding of the ways in which society itself becomes hierarchical and divided by race, class, gender and sexuality. In fall quarter, our guiding question will ask how capitalism evolved and came to be the way it is. How did relationships based on food, popular culture and social movements influence and become influenced by the emergence, development and concrete workings of U.S. political economy in the 20 century? In tandem with the evolution of the capitalist system, we will examine competing historical visions of political economy put forth by indigenous struggles, immigrant struggles, anti-slavery struggles, the feminist movement, the labor movement. At the same time, we will emphasize the lives of exploited and marginalized people as they encountered capitalism as an economic system. Through this work we will work to become better readers of our texts and of the world. In winter quarter, we will examine the interrelationship between the U.S. political economy and the changing global system, as well as U.S. foreign policy. We will study the causes and consequences of the globalization of capital and its effects on our daily lives, international migration, the role of multilateral institutions and the meaning of various trade agreements and regional organizations and alliances. We will look at the impact of the global order on our food system and explore the politics of culture, as people negotiate and contest new emerging regimes of labor, property and citizenship. Through protests, revolutions and riots, social movements continue to raise core questions regarding democracy, power, equality and the relationship between citizens, the state and the global economy, providing fruitful alternative analytical perspectives for the study of capitalist globalization and transnational networks. This quarter's work will allow us to deepen and strengthen our analytical skills.In spring, we will focus our efforts to learn from diverse, community-based institutions that offer us alternative visions of how to organize social and economic activity, in accordance with the basic principles of human rights, ethical labor practices and cooperative work and decision-making, through processes that respect the integrity of our environment and ecology. Working in conjunction with Evergreen's Center for Community-Based Learning and Action, schools, advocacy groups, veteran's rights groups and other nonprofit organizations, students are invited to examine strategies put forward by popular education models, immigrant rights advocates, gay/lesbian/transgender advocates and community-based economic models. In our last quarter, we will work to further develop our communication skills, organization and accountability. Anthony Zaragoza Savvina Chowdhury Freshmen FR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Gail Wootan
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening Su 14Summer Session II This course will examine the historical, cultural, and social reasons why women, despite their majority in many other sectors of life, are not filling leadership positions in the United States.  We will also identify solutions that exist for individuals and groups, and what has been done historically and presently to improve the path to leadership for women.  This course will primarily focus on US-related issues, but will also briefly study other countries and their struggles and successes in increasing gender diversity in leadership positions.  Students will learn through course readings, research projects, group activities, videos, seminars, presentations, guest lecturers, and personal reflection.   Gail Wootan Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Laurie Meeker
  Course SO–SRSophomore - Senior 4 04 Evening Su 14Summer Session II This four credit course is designed to introduce students to basic film theory and analysis through screenings, readings, seminar and critical writing. We will focus on films by and about women, working with feminist film theory as we explore the politics of representation in relation to gender.  Historically, the Classical Hollywood Narrative became the dominant form of popular visual entertainment.  We will briefly examine the characteristics of this form and its ideological implications before moving into an analysis of alternative representational strategies, including documentary, experimental, and abstract film forms. Laurie Meeker Tue Thu Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer