2013-14 Catalog

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2013-14 Undergraduate Index A-Z

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Title   Offering Standing Credits Credits When F W S Su Description Preparatory Faculty Days Multiple Standings Start Quarters Open Quarters
Dylan Fischer, Abir Biswas, Lin Nelson, Erik Thuesen, Alison Styring and Gerardo Chin-Leo
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior V V Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Environmental Studies. This independent learning opportunity is designed to allow advanced students to delve into real-world research with faculty who are currently engaged in specific projects. The program will help students develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, written and oral communication, collaboration and critical thinking skills—all of which are of particular value for students who are pursuing a graduate degree, as well as for graduates who are already in the job market. studies in nutrient and toxic trace metal cycles in terrestrial and coastal ecosystems. Potential projects could include studies of mineral weathering, wildfires and mercury cycling in ecosystems. Students could pursue these interests at the laboratory-scale or through field-scale biogeochemistry studies taking advantage of the Evergreen Ecological Observation Network (EEON), a long-term ecological study area. Students with backgrounds in a combination of geology, biology or chemistry could gain skills in soil, vegetation and water collection and learn methods of sample preparation and analysis for major and trace elements. studies marine phytoplankton and bacteria. His research interests include understanding the factors that control seasonal changes in the biomass and species composition of Puget Sound phytoplankton. In addition, he is investigating the role of marine bacteria in the geochemistry of estuaries and hypoxic fjords. studies plant ecology and physiology in the Intermountain West and southwest Washington. This work includes image analysis of tree roots, genes to ecosystems approaches, plant physiology, carbon balance, species interactions, community analysis and restoration ecology. He also manages the EEON project (academic.evergreen.edu/projects/EEON). See more about his lab's work at: academic.evergreen.edu/f/fischerd/E3.htm. studies and is involved with advocacy efforts on the linkages between environment, health, community and social justice. Students can become involved in researching environmental health in Northwest communities and Washington policy on phasing out persistent, bio-accumulative toxins. One major project students can work on is the impact of the Asarco smelter in Tacoma, examining public policy and regional health. studies birds. Current activity in her lab includes avian bioacoustics, natural history collections and bird research in the EEON. Bioacoustic research includes editing and identifying avian songs and calls from an extensive collection of sounds from Bornean rainforests. Work with the natural history collections includes bird specimen preparation and specimen-based research, including specimens from Evergreen's Natural History Collections and other collections in the region. Work with EEON includes observational and acoustic surveys of permanent ecological monitoring plots in The Evergreen State College campus forest. conducts research on the ecological physiology of marine animals. He and his students are currently investigating the physiological, behavioral and biochemical adaptations of gelatinous zooplankton to environmental stress and climate change. Other research is focused on the biodiversity of marine zooplankton. Students working in his lab typically have backgrounds in different aspects of marine science, ecology, physiology and biochemistry. Please go to the catalog view for specific information about each option. botany, ecology, education, entomology, environmental studies, environmental health, geology, land use planning, marine science, urban agriculture, taxonomy and zoology. Dylan Fischer Abir Biswas Lin Nelson Erik Thuesen Alison Styring Gerardo Chin-Leo Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Zoltan Grossman and Kristina Ackley
Signature Required: Winter 
  Program FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter Students will explore the juxtaposed themes of Frontier and Homeland, Empire and Periphery and the Indigenous and Immigrant experience. We will use historical analysis (changes in time) and geographic analysis (changes in place) to critique these themes, and will turn toward cultural analysis for a deeper understanding of race, nation, class and gender. We will take as our starting point a critique of Frederick Jackson Turner’s “Frontier Thesis”—that the frontier is "the meeting point between savagery and civilization"—as a racist rationale for the colonization of Native American homelands. We will consider alternative histories of Anglo-American expansion and settlement in North America, with interaction, change, and persistence as our unifying themes.We will study how place and connection is nurtured, re-imagined and interpreted, particularly in Indigenous and recent immigrant communities. We will connect between the ongoing process of "Manifest Destiny" in North America and subsequent overseas imperial expansion into Latin America, the Pacific and beyond. The colonial control of domestic homelands and imperial control of foreign homelands are both highlighted in recent patterns of recent immigration. These patterns involve many "immigrants" who are in fact indigenous to the Americas, as well as immigrants from countries once conquered by the U.S. military. The American Empire, it seems, began at home and its effects are coming back home and will be contested again.In fall quarter, we will track the historical progression of the frontier across North America and overseas and the territorial and cultural clashes of immigrant and colonized peoples. We will hear firsthand the life stories of local individuals and communities to understand their narratives of conflict, assimilation, resistance and survival. In the winter quarter, we will look at contemporary case studies that show the imprint of the past in the present and how 21st-century North American communities (particularly in the Pacific Northwest) are wrestling with the legacies of colonization, imperialism and migration. In particular, we will examine the overlapping experiences of Native Americans and recent immigrants, and Indigenous territories and migrations that transgress or straddle the international border as defined by "Homeland Security. This program offers ideal opportunities for students to develop skills in writing, research, and analysis. Zoltan Grossman Kristina Ackley Tue Wed Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Fall Fall Winter
Kristina Ackley and Zoltan Grossman
  Program FR–SOFreshmen - Sophomore 16 16 Day S 14Spring Students will explore the juxtaposed themes of Frontier and Homeland, Empire and Periphery and the Indigenous and Immigrant experience. We will use historical analysis (changes in time) and geographic analysis (changes in place) to critique these themes, and will turn toward cultural analysis for a deeper understanding of race, nation, class and gender. We will take as our starting point a critique of Frederick Jackson Turner’s “Frontier Thesis”—that the frontier is "the meeting point between savagery and civilization"—as a racist rationale for the colonization of Native American homelands. We will consider alternative histories of Anglo-American expansion and settlement in North America, with interaction, change, and persistence as our unifying themes.We will study how place and connection is nurtured, re-imagined and interpreted, particularly in Indigenous and recent immigrant communities. We will connect between the ongoing process of "Manifest Destiny" in North America and subsequent overseas imperial expansion into Latin America, the Pacific and beyond. The colonial control of domestic homelands and imperial control of foreign homelands are both highlighted in recent patterns of recent immigration. These patterns involve many "immigrants" who are in fact indigenous to the Americas, as well as immigrants from countries once conquered by the U.S. military. The American Empire, it seems, began at home and its effects are coming back home and will be contested again.We will track the historical progression of the frontier across North America and overseas and the territorial and cultural clashes of immigrant and colonized peoples. We will hear firsthand the life stories of local individuals and communities to understand their narratives of conflict, assimilation, resistance and survival. In particular, we will examine the overlapping experiences of Native Americans and recent immigrants, and Indigenous territories and migrations that transgress or straddle the international border as defined by Homeland Security. This program offers ideal opportunities for students to develop foundational skills in writing, research, and analysis. Kristina Ackley Zoltan Grossman Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Spring Spring
Rachel Hastings and Steven Scheuerell
Signature Required: Winter 
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 12, 16 12 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This is a yearlong interdisciplinary program that incorporates sociolinguistics, geography, history, cultural ecology, global change, biocultural diversity conservation, food systems and sustainable development studies to explore how societies evolve and survive in relation to their environment and a globalizing world. Our studies are based on the belief that many cultures have developed rich linguistic and ecological traditions that have provided the means for communication, food, clothing and shelter based on a sustainable relationship with the land. More recently, cultural and economic globalization are increasingly impacting local knowledge systems worldwide, in particular when measured by changes to language, land-use and food systems. These changes, together with such factors as increasing human population, environmental degradation, loss of biodiversity and climate change, compel us to explore the ways in which knowledge systems are preserved or lost. In particular, we recognize the urgent need to preserve cultural knowledge that allows a society to be rooted in place, recognize ecological limits and provide for its needs. The Andean region of South America is an ideal region to study these issues.The academic program consists of two phases. The first phase over fall quarter will focus on program themes using texts, lectures, workshops, film, writing and local field trips. Fall quarter the program will be offered for 12 credits to provide students with the option to separately register for an appropriate Spanish language course. Selection for the second phase over winter and spring quarters will be based upon criteria including successful completion of fall quarter work, demonstrated readiness for study abroad and Spanish language ability. In winter and spring, students will be full time in the program, which will be offered for 16 credits per quarter. Winter quarter will begin with 5 weeks of travel preparations and intensive study on Peru, followed by a 15-week study abroad experience in the Cusco region of the Peruvian Andes that incorporates intensive Spanish or Quechua language study, regional travel, seminars, urban and rural home stays and independent research or service learning with local organizations. At the end of the independent project period, we will reconvene for final student presentations and evaluation conferences in the Sacred Valley near Cusco.As the former Incan capital, and home to vibrant cultures and immense biodiversity, the Cusco region of Peru offers immersion in the study of biocultural diversity and how the preservation of linguistic diversity is related to the preservation of traditional ecological knowledge, biodiversity and local food systems. While in Peru, we will continue language and cultural studies while experiencing regional initiatives to preserve cultural landscapes and indigenous knowledge systems in the midst of development pressure. Given the region's rich history, knowledge systems, architecture, agriculture, weaving, ceramics and music, we will ask how is knowledge transferred across generations and between communities, and how can traditional knowledge be maximized in sustainable development projects?  As we address these academic questions, our own experiences will also lead us on to consider on a more individual level how learning another language and traveling abroad can increase our understanding of culture and what it means to fit into place. Rachel Hastings Steven Scheuerell Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Brittany Gallagher
  Course JR–GRJunior - Graduate 2, 4 02 04 Day, Evening and Weekend Su 14Summer Session II The Republic of Fiji is a collection of 322 islands in the South Pacific Ocean, home to about 858,000 people.  Although Fijians have done little to exacerbate the problem of global climate change, they and their neighbors in the South Pacific are among the first people on the planet to experience its effects.  Issues Islanders currently face include coral bleaching, threats to mangroves and other nearshore ecosystems, rising sea levels, and declining terrestrial biodiversity, including the loss of important endemic species.MES students traveling to Fiji will observe firsthand how the Fijian government, NGOs, and everyday people address the effects of climate change; from adaptation activities at a local level to lobbying the international community through regional partnerships with other Small Island Developing States (SIDS).The social, cultural, and political dimensions of these complex environmental issues will be explored through visits to coastal and inland villages, government offices, NGOs, and the University of the South Pacific (USP).  Students will visit major environmental sites on Viti Levu, Fiji’s largest island, including two national parks and other private reserves.  Guest speakers from USP and various governmental and non-governmental organizations will visit or host our group in their offices to speak about island biodiversity, geography, political economy, and community development. Religion in Fiji is an important and complex beast: students will have the opportunity to visit the most famous Hindu temple in the country, attend village church services, and learn about Islam in Fiji.  We will spend several days at an “eco-resort” in the Mamanuca islands, snorkeling on healthy and degraded reefs and engaging in mangrove conservation activities.  Students will also spend several nights in rural villages for an immersive experience alongside Fijians and expatriates working on community development initiatives. Academic credit will be awarded in Pacific Island Sustainability for either two or four credits. Four credits will be awarded for those participating in the trip, keeping a detailed field journal, writing a summary of the experience, and researching and writing a paper on a topic of island sustainability. Two credits will be awarded for participating in the field trip, maintaining a field journal, and writing a summary of the experience. All students are required to write a self-evaluation for the instructor. Students are encouraged to contact the instructor by emailing well prior to May 1 to express interest in the course, arrange travel, and indicate topic areas of interest to be explored during the trip. More practical information will be shared during three pre-trip on-campus meetings, to be arranged at the convenience of the student cohort. , has a background in international development and sustainability. She is a Returned Peace Corps Volunteer and former Rotary International Ambassadorial Scholar.  She lived in Suva, Fiji while earning a graduate certificate at the University of the South Pacific, where she studied geography and biodiversity protection.  Her research at USP focused on the intersections of religion and ecology in the region and the associated mix of social and environmental policy and local and national levels. At Evergreen, where she earned her MES degree, she was a graduate research associate who coordinated education programs for the Sustainability in Prisons Project and she focused her thesis research on the effects of science and sustainability education on prison inmates. Brittany Gallagher Summer Summer
Thomas Rainey and John Baldridge
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 8 08 Evening and Weekend W 14Winter S 14Spring This interdisciplinary program offers comparative study of the Russian conquest of northern Eurasia (Siberia) and the Euro-American conquest of North America.  It will explore the impact of what environmental historian Alfred Crosby calls "ecological imperialism" on native populations, economic development of the nations based on the exploitation of natural and agricultural resources, the ecological consequences of this exploitation, and the successes and failures of conservation efforts in Russia east of the Urals and in the United States west of the Mississippi.  It will also consider the religious, economic, and social motivations and apologias for the ecological conquests.  During the winter quarter, the program will examine these two world historical examples of ecological expansion and its consequences from 1600-1900; during the spring quarter, the program will explore the course and legacy of these conquests in the twentieth century as well as the current ecological state of these two continent-wide environments. Students can expect to read and write about bio-geographical, environmental-historical, ethnographic, natural historical, demographic, and political economic texts focusing on the western United States and on northern Eurasia. Personal and fictional accounts as well as films will also be used to enhance understanding of the environmental, economic, and social consequences of conquest. During the spring quarter, students can also expect to research and write short environmental histories of local areas in Western Washington.  Credit will largely be in environmental history, bio-geography, and political economy. Thomas Rainey John Baldridge Tue Thu Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter Spring
Elena Smith
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening Su 14Summer Session I This course attempts to inspire a better understanding of today's Russia and the people of Russia through a study of their history, literature, arts, and culture.  Everyone who has an interest in exploring Russia beyond the stereotypes of mainstream headlines or history textbooks is welcome.  The students will be introduced to certain dramatic events of Russian history through film, literature, and personal experiences of the Russian people. Besides the traditional academic activities, the students will have hands-on experiences of Russian cuisine, song, and dance.  Armed with an open mind and lead by a passionate native Russian professor, you should find Russia irresistibly attractive, and learn to appreciate the similarities of Russian and American cultures. Elena Smith Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Martha Rosemeyer, Sarah Williams and Thomas Johnson
Signature Required: Winter  Spring 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Spring emphasis: We will study agroecology, traditional agriculture and permaculture in a tropical context. Seminar will focus on international “sustainable development” and its contradictions, successes and challenges. As a final project, students will apply their knowledge of tropical crops and soils to create a farm plan in a geographic area of their choice. This would be excellent preparation for an internship abroad and/or Peace Corps. Martha Rosemeyer Sarah Williams Thomas Johnson Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
David Phillips
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall This interdisciplinary 16-credit program focuses on ecotourism, culture-based tourism and adventure travel. Ecotourism offers wildlife and nature experiences in protected habitats and pristine areas. Participative tourism is based on visits to traditional rural communities where travelers share in the daily lives of unique host cultures. Adventure travel involves endurance sports and high-skill challenges in natural settings. Ecotourism is often touted as a contributor to the conservation of ecosystems and wildlife habitats, and to economic development in rural communities. We explore the history, outcomes and future potential of ecotourism in different parts of the world.We study historic travel accounts and the literature of travel, changing modes of tourism, including solo travel and the global trend toward leisure travel. Creative writing and storytelling allow students to share their own travel experiences and goals. Travel media and journalism, books, films and the internet provide sources for discussion and writing, and topics for research.We study current theory of ecotourism, including policy and case studies, and acquire tools for critical analysis. Students study the ecotourism market, including planning, management, operations, and project outcomes. Sustainability criteria for ecotourism is a key topic. We study impacts of culturally-focused “participative” travel in developing countries, and the relationship of tourism to environmental changes. Students’ weekly essays, journals and narratives serve to elaborate on diverse topics and the learning process.The program includes a Spanish language component.  Students are encouraged to study the language for the full 16 credits (or to take another foreign language or elective course, as a 12-credit option).Students collaborate in groups or work individually to design and present models for ecotourism and adventure travel. Term projects can focus on business development, operations, outdoor safety and environmental education, travel writing, eco-lodge design, photography, travel films, internet and other media, applied research in tourism, or other related areas of interest.Guest speakers relate their experiences in the adventure travel and ecotourism businesses. Day-long outdoor experiences and multi-day class trips add an experiential component to the program, and films and videos round out our learning about ecotourism and adventure travel. David Phillips Mon Wed Fri Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Michael Vavrus
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening Su 14Summer Full             Human Geography focuses on geography as a cultural encounter.  We will study patterns and processes that have shaped human interaction with various environments. The course encompasses human, political, cultural, social, and economic aspects of geography.  Central guiding questions we will be addressing in this course:This survey of human geography introduces broad concepts that are the focus of contemporary studies in geography.  These concepts includeGraduate students are welcome to attend this course for undergraduate credit.     Michael Vavrus Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Peter Impara and Dina Roberts
Signature Required: Winter 
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter How do we manage the habitat of mammals and birds, especially endangered species, in the Pacific Northwest? Mammals and birds are intelligent, complex animals that often have very specific habitat needs for successful living and reproduction. They interact in very elaborate ways with members of their species, other species, and with the landscape as a whole.  A detailed understanding of habitat needs and how these habitats are distributed across the landscape is crucial to managing landscape to ensure future survival of particular species.This upper-division program will focus on examining and analyzing the habitat needs of specific species. Students will learn, develop and apply an intricate interdisciplinary suite of knowledge and techniques that include spatial analysis, ecological modeling, integration of scientific, legal and political information, and computer tools such as Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to develop habitat conservation plans for threatened and endangered species as listed under the Endangered Species Act of 1973.Students will learn about the natural history of specific mammals and birds of the Pacific Northwest and other regions.  Habitat analysis will be conducted at the landscape scale, integrating the disciplines of landscape ecology with wildlife habitat analysis, wildlife biology, and habitat conservation planning. A final two-quarter project will be to develop and present a formal habitat conservation plan (HCP) for a threatened or endangered Pacific Northwest mammal or bird. Students will be required to understand and apply legal concepts associated with the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (as amended) as well as develop an understanding of stakeholders’ concerns and related issues surrounding resource users that may or may not come into conflict with the conservation of their selected species.Lectures will cover the areas of landscape ecology, wildlife habitat analysis, wildlife biology, evolution, and habitat conservation planning. Guest speakers will present recent case studies and approaches to conservation planning. Field trips to locations where wildlife management and conservation are occurring will expose students to methods of habitat assessment, conservation and restoration. Peter Impara Dina Roberts Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
John Baldridge
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening W 14Winter Maps are powerful tools for understanding the relationships between people and place.  They have been used to divide and unite, to expose environmental problems, to plan for peace, and to prepare for war.  If a picture is worth a thousand words, a map might be worth millions.In this course, students will learn the basics of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for the production of digital maps using computer software.  We will study the elements of good cartographic design and apply those elements to produce meaningful maps with a purpose.  The first half of the quarter will be spent developing fundamental skills with GIS software.  The second half of the quarter will culminate in a project to produce a series of maps that illustrate a social or environmental problem, and which could be used to advocate for a change in policy or raise public awareness about an issue. John Baldridge Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
John Baldridge
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening S 14Spring Maps are powerful tools for understanding the relationships between people and place.  They have been used to divide and unite, to expose environmental problems, to plan for peace, and to prepare for war.  If a picture is worth a thousand words, a map might be worth millions.In this course, students will learn the basics of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for the production of digital maps using computer software.  We will study the elements of good cartographic design and apply those elements to produce meaningful maps with a purpose.  The first half of the quarter will be spent developing fundamental skills with GIS software.  The second half of the quarter will culminate in a project to produce a series of maps that illustrate a social or environmental problem, and which could be used to advocate for a change in policy or raise public awareness about an issue. John Baldridge Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4, 8 04 08 Day, Evening and Weekend Su 14Summer Session I : This study-abroad program will explore two great cultural centers of Russia, Moscow and Kazan.  For most of this excursion, students will be hosted by environmental studies faculty at Kazan Federal University, one of the most prestigious universities in Russia.  This program offers a truly a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to collaborate with local students and faculty in Russia, in close cooperation with experienced Evergreen faculty members, as we explore the history and environment of this region. Moscow is Russia’s Eternal City, the old and the new capital of all the Russias. In Moscow, the group will take guided tours of major historical sites, including the Moscow Kremlin, the Armory Museum, the Tretyakov Art Gallery, Novodevichi Convent and Monastery, and the Trinity-St. Sergei Monastery outside the city. Then participants will take a night train to Kazan on the Volga River, the very heartland and capital of Tatarstan, a semi-independent republic in the middle of Russia. Kazan was the capital of the last Tatar successor state, re-conquered for Russia by Ivan the Terrible, in 1552. It is where the Asian East meets the Russian West, the population evenly divided between the Volga Tatars and Russians. The Tatars are Sunni Muslims, and the Russians are Eastern Orthodox Christians. In Kazan, student travelers will receive lectures on the culture, geography, and environmental history of Tatarstan from the faculty of Kazan Federal University. They will visit several cultural sites in and around the city, including the Kazan Kremlin, the city art museum, and archeological exhibits. The primary activities of the group in Tatarstan, however, will be several ecological field trips to protected areas, such as the Volga-Kama Nature Preserve (Zapovednik). The group will then return to Moscow, where, time permitting before our flights home, we will perhaps stroll along the Arbat, pay our respects at the monument of Russia’s unknown soldier, lay some flowers at the foot of the statue of Russia’s greatest poet, Alexander Pushkin, or spend a few quiet moments in one of the city’s famous churches, listening to a Russian choir singing a sacred mass. And wherever we go, we will enjoy Russian and Tatar food, sights, sounds and hospitality.   Credit equivalencies may include: Russian Studies, Environmental History, Political Ecology, and Geography John Baldridge Thomas Rainey Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer
John Baldridge
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Evening F 13 Fall Explore the history of imperialism and early globalization through real-life stories of shipwrecks and mutiny in this 8-credit Evening & Weekend Studies program.  Learn the history behind , experience the true-life story of the shipwreck that inspired Melville’s , and read the horrific tale of incompetence and cannibalism following the wreck of the tall ship , which inspired one of the most famous paintings of an era.  Then, set sail on the waters of the Puget Sound/Salish Sea to "learn the ropes" for real on an actual wooden sailing ship.  This program is not for the faint of heart but is open to any and all! We will study historical accounts of famed shipwrecks and mutiny and the political, economic, and social contexts in which they took place.  The "Age of Sail" constituted the genesis of western ideas about nationalism, globalization and cannibalism, and early European exploration by ship helped create and perpetuate enduring (and all-too-inaccurate) racial narratives that persist to this day.  Together, we will debunk the distortions of history; sail the seas of literature, film, music, art, and rhetoric; and explore how the stories, language, and traditions of tall-ship sailors continue to shape the way we understand and describe the world.  You won’t have to "walk the plank" before you learn what it means to be "three sheets to the wind" or "have the devil to pay."  Above all—and this is guaranteed—no one will be "keel hauled" in the course of this program!Look forward to guest speakers in such areas as music, art, and maritime studies.  Texts and films will be accompanied by lectures on historical geographies of globalization, imperialism, and culture, as well as workshops on art and music of the period.  Be prepared to learn and/or compose sea shanties and, weather permitting, sing them on the deck of a wooden ship under sail!  Book-length readings (and/or excerpts) will include: (Caroline Alexander); (Nathaniel Philbrick); (Jonathan Miles); (Neil Hanson); (Andrew Jampoler); (Caroline Alexander); and others. Film screenings may include: (2011); (1962); (2002); and more. Seminars on readings and films, along with workshops on art, music, history and geography will be complemented by a full-day Saturday field trip aboard a wooden sailing ship in the South Sound, so program participants can experience some of the conditions of life experienced by the sailors whose stories we will learn.A rollicking time will be had by all, and we’ll have salt in our veins by the end of the quarter, for sure! John Baldridge Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Peter Dorman
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring There are of poor people in the world today, and even more who have limited access to health care, education and political and cultural opportunities. The word commonly used to refer to the process of economic growth and the expansion of opportunity is development—but there is enormous disagreement over how this word should be understood or even whether it should be used at all. This program will examine development on multiple levels: historical, philosophical, political and economic. It will place the quest for development in the context of European colonial expansion, military conflict and the tension between competing cultural frameworks. In doing this, it will combine “outside” views of development, as seen by administrators and experts, with the “inside” views of people who are most directly affected by development and its absence. At the same time, there will be a strong push toward usable knowledge: learning the skills that are essential for people who work in the field of development and want to make a dent in this radically unequal world. Economics will be an important contributor to our knowledge base; the program will offer introductory-level micro- and macroeconomics, with examples drawn from the development experience. Just as important is statistics, since quantitative methods have become indispensable in development work. We will learn about survey methodology and techniques used to analyze data. Another basis for this program is the belief that economics, politics and lived experience are inseparable. Just as quantitative techniques are used to shed light on people’s experiences, their own voices are essential for making sense of the numbers and can sometimes overrule them altogether. We will read literature that expresses the perspective of writers from non-Western countries, view films and consider other forms of testimony. The goal is to see the world, as much as possible, through their eyes as well as ours.Spring quarter will be devoted primarily to research. It will begin with a short, intensive training in research methods, based on the strategy of deeply analyzing a few papers to see how their authors researched and wrote them. After this, depending on the skills and interests of students, an effort will be made to place them as assistants to professional researchers or, if they prefer, they can pursue their own projects. We will meet as a group periodically to discuss emerging trends in development research and practice, as well as to help each other cope with the difficulties in our own work. By the end of three quarters, students should be prepared for internships or further professional studies in this field. Peter Dorman Mon Mon Wed Thu Thu Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter