2013-14 Catalog

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2013-14 Undergraduate Index A-Z

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Law And Government Policy [clear]


Title   Offering Standing Credits Credits When F W S Su Description Preparatory Faculty Days Multiple Standings Start Quarters Open Quarters
Dylan Fischer, Abir Biswas, Lin Nelson, Erik Thuesen, Alison Styring and Gerardo Chin-Leo
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior V V Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Environmental Studies. This independent learning opportunity is designed to allow advanced students to delve into real-world research with faculty who are currently engaged in specific projects. The program will help students develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, written and oral communication, collaboration and critical thinking skills—all of which are of particular value for students who are pursuing a graduate degree, as well as for graduates who are already in the job market. studies in nutrient and toxic trace metal cycles in terrestrial and coastal ecosystems. Potential projects could include studies of mineral weathering, wildfires and mercury cycling in ecosystems. Students could pursue these interests at the laboratory-scale or through field-scale biogeochemistry studies taking advantage of the Evergreen Ecological Observation Network (EEON), a long-term ecological study area. Students with backgrounds in a combination of geology, biology or chemistry could gain skills in soil, vegetation and water collection and learn methods of sample preparation and analysis for major and trace elements. studies marine phytoplankton and bacteria. His research interests include understanding the factors that control seasonal changes in the biomass and species composition of Puget Sound phytoplankton. In addition, he is investigating the role of marine bacteria in the geochemistry of estuaries and hypoxic fjords. studies plant ecology and physiology in the Intermountain West and southwest Washington. This work includes image analysis of tree roots, genes to ecosystems approaches, plant physiology, carbon balance, species interactions, community analysis and restoration ecology. He also manages the EEON project (academic.evergreen.edu/projects/EEON). See more about his lab's work at: academic.evergreen.edu/f/fischerd/E3.htm. studies and is involved with advocacy efforts on the linkages between environment, health, community and social justice. Students can become involved in researching environmental health in Northwest communities and Washington policy on phasing out persistent, bio-accumulative toxins. One major project students can work on is the impact of the Asarco smelter in Tacoma, examining public policy and regional health. studies birds. Current activity in her lab includes avian bioacoustics, natural history collections and bird research in the EEON. Bioacoustic research includes editing and identifying avian songs and calls from an extensive collection of sounds from Bornean rainforests. Work with the natural history collections includes bird specimen preparation and specimen-based research, including specimens from Evergreen's Natural History Collections and other collections in the region. Work with EEON includes observational and acoustic surveys of permanent ecological monitoring plots in The Evergreen State College campus forest. conducts research on the ecological physiology of marine animals. He and his students are currently investigating the physiological, behavioral and biochemical adaptations of gelatinous zooplankton to environmental stress and climate change. Other research is focused on the biodiversity of marine zooplankton. Students working in his lab typically have backgrounds in different aspects of marine science, ecology, physiology and biochemistry. Please go to the catalog view for specific information about each option. botany, ecology, education, entomology, environmental studies, environmental health, geology, land use planning, marine science, urban agriculture, taxonomy and zoology. Dylan Fischer Abir Biswas Lin Nelson Erik Thuesen Alison Styring Gerardo Chin-Leo Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Jose Gomez
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 12 12 Day, Evening and Weekend Su 14Summer Full This program will take a critical look at controversial issues in the criminal justice system, including police misconduct and interrogation, mandatory minimum sentencing, decriminalization of marijuana and prostitution, needle exchange programs, the insanity defense, children tried as adults, privatization of prisons, and physician-assisted suicide. It will be taught via the Internet through a virtual learning environment (Moodle or Canvas), a chat room for live webinars, and e-mail. A one-time face-to-face orientation will take place 7:00 to 9:30 pm on Monday, June 23. Contact instructor for alternate arrangements for the orientation. Jose Gomez Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Artee Young
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 12 12 Day Su 14Summer Full The goal of this program is to equip  students with knowledge and understanding of national and state governmental institutions  and how they function in order to serve the people . The objective is achieved through extensive exploration into  theoretical and pragmatic knowledge about how democratic systems work. This program offers an opportunity to engage in an intense collaborative exercise in  participatory governance in order to know  how the multiple layers of government in our state and nation continue to evolve as the nation expands.   To this end, we will delve deeply to learn how government  has worked from its inception to the present.   Participatory governance is based not only on knowledge about how government works, but also on voting patterns and vote-counts; thus, this program seeks to interrogate issues, legislation and proposed laws that obstruct citizens’ access to the right to vote.  We will also investigate the causes and effects of declining citizen interest  in voting, a factor that critically erodes the ideal of government of, by and for the people.   We will also examine the roles of “the people” in this evolving democracy  through texts, journal articles, governmental websites, significant court cases,  films, lecture, guest speakers and student oral presentations.  The approach to this body of information focuses on the content and processes by which the people acquire information and engage officials in national and state branches of government.  Themes include, but are not limited to, federalism, states' rights, and citizens' participatory governance and rights.  Students will also visit the Washington State Capitol and legislative offices,  the Washington State Archives  as well as the Temple of Justice  Artee Young Mon Wed Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Arleen Sandifer
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening and Weekend Su 14Summer Session I In its first words on the subject of citizenship, Congress in 1790 restricted naturalization to ‘white persons.’   [T]his racial prerequisite to citizenship endured for over a century and a half, remaining in force until 1952.   From the earliest years of this country until just a generation ago, being a "white person" was a condition for acquiring citizenship.” -- Ian Haney Lopez, , 1. Most people do not realize that the notion of the United States as a “white” majority nation is largely a construction of law. In this course, we examine how our understanding of immigration history and law changes if we shift our view from Ellis Island in New York’s harbor to the U.S. southern border.  We’ll examine the current landscape of immigration law and policy and restrictionist and immigrant-rights movements.  We’ll critically analyze how concepts of race are embedded in immigration law and policy and how those embedded concepts drive the current debates on immigration reform. Students will build some basic legal skills through reading and researching important cases and laws. We’ll look at the historical context within which immigration issues relating to the southern U.S. border have arisen and continue to be defined.  We will examine current controversies about immigration, immigrant workers, labor movements, and the varied ways communities respond to the most recent immigration boom.Major areas of study include: U.S. history, immigration history, immigration law, politics, American studies, and critical race theory. This course is preparatory for careers and future studies in history, law, labor organizing, government and politics.               Arleen Sandifer Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Erik Thuesen
  Program FR ONLYFreshmen Only 16 16 Day F 13 Fall Water is essential to life, and the environmental policies related to marine and aquatic ecosystems will provide many of the subjects for our study in this full-year program. When combined with introductory policy components starting with the Pacific Northwest and looking globally, our studies of the biological, physical and chemical characteristics of oceans will provide the valuable knowledge necessary to make instrumental decisions about marine resources and habitats. It is essential to understand the interconnections between biology and ecology in order to make informed decisions about how environmental policy should proceed. This core program is designed to provide scientific skills and policy knowledge necessary to understand problems facing Earth’s ecosystems. Learning will take place through lectures, seminars, a workshop series and biology laboratory exercises. Work in the field and multi-day field trips in fall and winter are also planned to gain first-hand exposure to various marine environments.In the fall, we will cover standard topics of first year college biology, using marine organisms as our foci. The overall objective of this component is to gain basic familiarity with the biology and ecology of ocean life. We will examine the use and abuse of decision-making authority in order to assess how science and culture interact to safeguard endangered biota. Specific topics will include policies surrounding marine mammals, anadromous fish, ocean acidification, etc.  Fall quarter topics will be mostly gathered from local and regional issues. Erik Thuesen Freshmen FR Fall Fall
Rika Anderson
  Program FR ONLYFreshmen Only 16 16 Day W 14Winter Water is essential to life, and the environmental policies related to marine and aquatic ecosystems will provide many of the subjects for our study in this program. When combined with introductory policy components starting with the Pacific Northwest and looking globally, our studies of the biological, physical and chemical characteristics of oceans will provide the valuable knowledge necessary to make instrumental decisions about marine resources and habitats. It is essential to understand the interconnections between biology and ecology in order to make informed decisions about how environmental policy should proceed. This core program is designed to provide scientific skills and policy knowledge necessary to understand problems facing Earth’s ecosystems. Learning will take place through lectures, seminars, a workshop series and laboratory exercises.We will approach these issues from the perspective of the whole ocean ecosystem: how do currents, seasons, nutrient cycles, and other physical and chemical properties affect life in our oceans? What part does each type of organism play within the ecosystem? How can changes in one component of the ecosystem have ripple effects on the rest? We will apply this scientific knowledge to critically assess important marine environmental issues, focusing on ocean acidification, climate change, fisheries policy, and deep-sea mining. A week-long field trip to Friday Harbor will provide hands-on oceanographic experience, and a trip to the Capitol will allow us to witness legislation of important marine issues in action. Rika Anderson Freshmen FR Winter Winter
Michael Vavrus
  Course FR–GRFreshmen - Graduate 4 04 Day Su 14Summer Session I             Pacific Northwest History introduces multicultural aspects of historical developments of this region.  A primary learning objective is for students to be able to articulate through concrete historical examples how liberty and justice has been interpreted and applied in the Northwest.  With texts that provide accessible historical accounts, students will be exposed to Native American Indian perspectives on the eventual occupation of their lands by European imperialists, the origins and outcomes of competition among Europeans for the Pacific Northwest, and challenges placed on non-European ethnic groups – such as Chinese Americans, African Americans, Mexican Americans, Japanese Americans – during the 19 and 20 centuries and into the 21 century. Attention to the experiences of women in making this history is included. The local historical development of Tacoma is used to highlight the role of capitalism in creating governing bodies and class differences among white European Americans who collectively discriminated against the aspirations of people of color. Films and other course material periodically describe and present images of violence and use language that may be considered offensive. The purpose of this material is to present significant events within their respective historical contexts. Michael Vavrus Summer Summer
Lawrence Mosqueda and Michael Vavrus
Signature Required: Spring 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day W 14Winter S 14Spring In this program students will investigate how political events are constructed and reported in the media, compared to actual political and economic realities. By media we mean mainstream periodicals, television, radio and films and emerging social media. We also include the growth of Internet blogs, websites, independent media and other media outlets in the 21st century. We will take a historical approach that focuses on U.S. history from the colonial era to contemporary globalization. We will compare corporate media concentration of ownership to community-controlled media and social media. We will examine how issues surrounding race, class and gender are perceived by the media and subsequently by the public. During winter quarter, students will receive a theoretical and historical grounding in the political economy of the media. We will explore the question of who owns the media and what difference this makes to how stories are reported, framed, sourced or just ignored. Films, lectures and readings, along with text-based seminars, will compose the primary structures used by this learning community. Students will regularly engage in a critical reading of and other media outlets. Also during the winter quarter, students will create a research proposal that includes an annotated bibliography. Research projects may either be traditional research papers or equivalent projects determined in collaboration with the faculty, such as an independent media blog or website. During spring quarter, students will devote approximately half of the program time to completing their proposed projects and presenting the results of their research. The remaining program time will focus more in-depth on program themes as we examine contemporary issues through a variety of sources. Lawrence Mosqueda Michael Vavrus Tue Wed Fri Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter Spring
Myra Downing
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 12 12 Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This program teaches from a Native-based perspective within the context of the larger global society. Students at all reservation sites follow the same curriculum with opportunities to focus on local tribal-specific issues. This program will prepare students to understand the structural inequalities of wealth and economic development. Students will also examine social problems in Native communities through multiple methods and perspectives. Students will understand the impacts of social and political movements, both past and present, by comparing Indigenous societies in the world.The theme for fall quarter is "Indigenous Pathways to Rich and Thriving Communities." Students will examine the field of community and economic development and explore contemporary economic development issues in tribal communities. Students will study the values, vision and principles that guide community and economic development efforts, the process of development, and change strategies such as asset building and community organizing. The course will focus on the promotion of equity and address critical issues such as poverty, racism and disinvestment."Building Healthy Communities" is the theme for winter quarter. During this quarter, students will examine the field of social problems and social policies in a wide range of areas. Students will explore the underlying drive that guides efforts to identify and resolve social problems that challenge society at large and tribal communities in particular, and review the process of building healthy communities and how change strategies are implemented. The theme for spring quarter is "Comparing Indigenous Societies through Social and Political Movements." Students will use a variety of methods, materials and approaches to interpret, analyze, evaluate and synthesize the impact of indigenous peoples' history and policies on 21st century Indigenous societies. Students will focus on movements and activism that changed Indigenous societies at various levels of the social/political landscape from local to international.Over the program year, students from all sites meet thirteen Saturdays on campus at the Longhouse. Through case study and other methods, the curriculum is enhanced and supported. Students participate in workshop-type strands and an integrated seminar that increases writing skills and broadens their exposure to the arts, social sciences, political science and natural science, and other more narrowly defined fields of study. Myra Downing Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Mary DuPuis
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 12 12 Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This program teaches from a Native-based perspective within the context of the larger global society. Students at all reservation sites follow the same curriculum with opportunities to focus on local tribal-specific issues. This program will prepare students to understand the structural inequalities of wealth and economic development. Students will also examine social problems in Native communities through multiple methods and perspectives. Students will understand the impacts of social and political movements, both past and present, by comparing Indigenous societies in the world.The theme for fall quarter is "Indigenous Pathways to Rich and Thriving Communities." Students will examine the field of community and economic development and explore contemporary economic development issues in tribal communities. Students will study the values, vision and principles that guide community and economic development efforts, the process of development, and change strategies such as asset building and community organizing. The course will focus on the promotion of equity and address critical issues such as poverty, racism and disinvestment."Building Healthy Communities" is the theme for winter quarter. During this quarter, students will examine the field of social problems and social policies in a wide range of areas. Students will explore the underlying drive that guides efforts to identify and resolve social problems that challenge society at large and tribal communities in particular, and review the process of building healthy communities and how change strategies are implemented. The theme for spring quarter is "Comparing Indigenous Societies through Social and Political Movements." Students will use a variety of methods, materials and approaches to interpret, analyze, evaluate and synthesize the impact of indigenous peoples' history and policies on 21st century Indigenous societies. Students will focus on movements and activism that changed Indigenous societies at various levels of the social/political landscape from local to international.Over the program year, students from all sites meet thirteen Saturdays on campus at the Longhouse. Through case study and other methods, the curriculum is enhanced and supported. Students participate in workshop-type strands and an integrated seminar that increases writing skills and broadens their exposure to the arts, social sciences, political science and natural science, and other more narrowly defined fields of study. Mary DuPuis Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Tracey Hosselkus
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 12 12 Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This program teaches from a Native-based perspective within the context of the larger global society. Students at all reservation sites follow the same curriculum with opportunities to focus on local tribal-specific issues. This program will prepare students to understand the structural inequalities of wealth and economic development. Students will also examine social problems in Native communities through multiple methods and perspectives. Students will understand the impacts of social and political movements, both past and present, by comparing Indigenous societies in the world.The theme for fall quarter is "Indigenous Pathways to Rich and Thriving Communities." Students will examine the field of community and economic development and explore contemporary economic development issues in tribal communities. Students will study the values, vision and principles that guide community and economic development efforts, the process of development, and change strategies such as asset building and community organizing. The course will focus on the promotion of equity and address critical issues such as poverty, racism and disinvestment."Building Healthy Communities" is the theme for winter quarter. During this quarter, students will examine the field of social problems and social policies in a wide range of areas. Students will explore the underlying drive that guides efforts to identify and resolve social problems that challenge society at large and tribal communities in particular, and review the process of building healthy communities and how change strategies are implemented. The theme for spring quarter is "Comparing Indigenous Societies through Social and Political Movements." Students will use a variety of methods, materials and approaches to interpret, analyze, evaluate and synthesize the impact of indigenous peoples' history and policies on 21st century Indigenous societies. Students will focus on movements and activism that changed Indigenous societies at various levels of the social/political landscape from local to international.Over the program year, students from all sites meet thirteen Saturdays on campus at the Longhouse. Through case study and other methods, the curriculum is enhanced and supported. Students participate in workshop-type strands and an integrated seminar that increases writing skills and broadens their exposure to the arts, social sciences, political science and natural science, and other more narrowly defined fields of study. Tracey Hosselkus Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Colleen Almojuela
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 12 12 Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This program teaches from a Native-based perspective within the context of the larger global society. Students at all reservation sites follow the same curriculum with opportunities to focus on local tribal-specific issues. This program will prepare students to understand the structural inequalities of wealth and economic development. Students will also examine social problems in Native communities through multiple methods and perspectives. Students will understand the impacts of social and political movements, both past and present, by comparing Indigenous societies in the world.The theme for fall quarter is "Indigenous Pathways to Rich and Thriving Communities." Students will examine the field of community and economic development and explore contemporary economic development issues in tribal communities. Students will study the values, vision and principles that guide community and economic development efforts, the process of development, and change strategies such as asset building and community organizing. The course will focus on the promotion of equity and address critical issues such as poverty, racism and disinvestment."Building Healthy Communities" is the theme for winter quarter. During this quarter, students will examine the field of social problems and social policies in a wide range of areas. Students will explore the underlying drive that guides efforts to identify and resolve social problems that challenge society at large and tribal communities in particular, and review the process of building healthy communities and how change strategies are implemented. The theme for spring quarter is "Comparing Indigenous Societies through Social and Political Movements." Students will use a variety of methods, materials and approaches to interpret, analyze, evaluate and synthesize the impact of indigenous peoples' history and policies on 21st century Indigenous societies. Students will focus on movements and activism that changed Indigenous societies at various levels of the social/political landscape from local to international.Over the program year, students from all sites meet thirteen Saturdays on campus at the Longhouse. Through case study and other methods, the curriculum is enhanced and supported. Students participate in workshop-type strands and an integrated seminar that increases writing skills and broadens their exposure to the arts, social sciences, political science and natural science, and other more narrowly defined fields of study. Colleen Almojuela Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Dorothy Flaherty
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 12 12 Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This program teaches from a Native-based perspective within the context of the larger global society. Students at all reservation sites follow the same curriculum with opportunities to focus on local tribal-specific issues. This program will prepare students to understand the structural inequalities of wealth and economic development. Students will also examine social problems in Native communities through multiple methods and perspectives. Students will understand the impacts of social and political movements, both past and present, by comparing Indigenous societies in the world.The theme for fall quarter is "Indigenous Pathways to Rich and Thriving Communities." Students will examine the field of community and economic development and explore contemporary economic development issues in tribal communities. Students will study the values, vision and principles that guide community and economic development efforts, the process of development, and change strategies such as asset building and community organizing. The course will focus on the promotion of equity and address critical issues such as poverty, racism and disinvestment."Building Healthy Communities" is the theme for winter quarter. During this quarter, students will examine the field of social problems and social policies in a wide range of areas. Students will explore the underlying drive that guides efforts to identify and resolve social problems that challenge society at large and tribal communities in particular, and review the process of building healthy communities and how change strategies are implemented. The theme for spring quarter is "Comparing Indigenous Societies through Social and Political Movements." Students will use a variety of methods, materials and approaches to interpret, analyze, evaluate and synthesize the impact of indigenous peoples' history and policies on 21st century Indigenous societies. Students will focus on movements and activism that changed Indigenous societies at various levels of the social/political landscape from local to international.Over the program year, students from all sites meet thirteen Saturdays on campus at the Longhouse. Through case study and other methods, the curriculum is enhanced and supported. Students participate in workshop-type strands and an integrated seminar that increases writing skills and broadens their exposure to the arts, social sciences, political science and natural science, and other more narrowly defined fields of study. Dorothy Flaherty Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Renee Swan-Waite
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 12 12 Evening and Weekend F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This program teaches from a Native-based perspective within the context of the larger global society. Students at all reservation sites follow the same curriculum with opportunities to focus on local tribal-specific issues. This program will prepare students to understand the structural inequalities of wealth and economic development. Students will also examine social problems in Native communities through multiple methods and perspectives. Students will understand the impacts of social and political movements, both past and present, by comparing Indigenous societies in the world.The theme for fall quarter is "Indigenous Pathways to Rich and Thriving Communities." Students will examine the field of community and economic development and explore contemporary economic development issues in tribal communities. Students will study the values, vision and principles that guide community and economic development efforts, the process of development, and change strategies such as asset building and community organizing. The course will focus on the promotion of equity and address critical issues such as poverty, racism and disinvestment."Building Healthy Communities" is the theme for winter quarter. During this quarter, students will examine the field of social problems and social policies in a wide range of areas. Students will explore the underlying drive that guides efforts to identify and resolve social problems that challenge society at large and tribal communities in particular, and review the process of building healthy communities and how change strategies are implemented. The theme for spring quarter is "Comparing Indigenous Societies through Social and Political Movements." Students will use a variety of methods, materials and approaches to interpret, analyze, evaluate and synthesize the impact of indigenous peoples' history and policies on 21st century Indigenous societies. Students will focus on movements and activism that changed Indigenous societies at various levels of the social/political landscape from local to international.Over the program year, students from all sites meet thirteen Saturdays on campus at the Longhouse. Through case study and other methods, the curriculum is enhanced and supported. Students participate in workshop-type strands and an integrated seminar that increases writing skills and broadens their exposure to the arts, social sciences, political science and natural science, and other more narrowly defined fields of study. Renee Swan-Waite Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Anthony Zaragoza
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su 14Summer Session II Anthony Zaragoza Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer