2013-14 Catalog

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2013-14 Undergraduate Index A-Z

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Mathematics [clear]


Title   Offering Standing Credits Credits When F W S Su Description Preparatory Faculty Days Multiple Standings Start Quarters Open Quarters
Rik Smoody
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day S 14Spring Computers are a driving force of our modern world and increasingly influence our lives. Mathematics and mathematical models lay at the foundation of modern computers; furthermore, we increasingly rely on mathematics as a language for understanding the natural world, such as complex climate models that predict major changes in weather patterns world wide over the next 50 years. Mathematics and computational thinking enable people as citizens to make good decisions on a wide range of issues from interpreting the evidence for climate change to understanding the potential impacts of technology; as such, they are an integral part of a liberal arts education. In this program, we will explore connections between mathematics, computer science, the natural sciences and graphic arts.We will develop mathematical abstractions and the skills to express, analyze and solve simple problems in the sciences and the arts and explore how to program interesting visual shapes using simple geometry. Class sessions include seminars, lectures, problem-solving workshops, programming labs, problem sets and seminars with writing assignments. The emphasis will be on fluency in mathematical and statistical thinking and expression along with reflections on mathematics and society. Topics will include concepts of algebra, algorithms, programming and problem solving, with seminar readings about the role of mathematics in education, the sciences and society.This program is intended for students who want to gain a fundamental understanding of mathematics and computing before leaving college or before pursuing further work in the sciences or the arts. Rik Smoody Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Vauhn Foster-Grahler
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day F 13 Fall Algebraic Thinking develops problem-solving and critical-thinking skills by using algebra to solve context-based problems.  Problems are approached algebraically, graphically, numerically, and verbally.  Topics include linear, quadratic, and exponential functions, right-triangle trigonometry, and data analysis.  Collaborative learning is emphasized. Vauhn Foster-Grahler Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Alison Styring
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day W 14Winter Birds are considered important indicators of habitat quality and are often the focus of conservation-oriented research, restoration, and monitoring.  A variety of field and analytical methods commonly used in bird monitoring and avian research will be covered.  Theory will be applied to practice in the field and lab where students will develop skills in fieldwork, data management, and statistical analysis.  Students will demonstrate their learning through active participation in all class activities; a detailed field journal; in-class, take-home, and field assignments; and a final project. An understanding of avian natural history is important to any successful project, and students without a working knowledge of the common birds in the South Puget Sound region are expected to improve their identification skills to a level that will allow them to effectively contribute to class efforts both in the field and in class. Alison Styring Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Allen Mauney
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Evening and Weekend Su 14Summer Session II This program focuses on integral and multi-variable calculus. The definite integral will be motivated by calculating areas and defined in terms of limits. The connection between differential and integral calculus will be made via the FTC. All basic techniques of integration will be studied with emphasis on using definite integrals to answer questions from geometry and physics. Polar and parametric functions and series will be briefly covered. Vectors, gradients, and multiple integrals will be the focus of the second half of the class. There is a significant online component to the class. Calc 1 is required. Allen Mauney Mon Wed Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Vauhn Foster-Grahler
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This year-long sequence of courses will provide a rigorous treatment of the procedures, concepts, and applications of differential and integral calculus, multi-dimensional space, sequences, and series.  This year-long sequence is appropriate for students who are planning to teach secondary mathematics or engage in further study in mathematics, science, or economics.  In particular we will cover applications of differentiation including related rates and optimization and of integration including area, arc length, volume, and distribution functions. We will gain a deep understanding of the analytical geometry of lines, surfaces, and vectors in multi-dimensional space and engage in a rigorous treatment of sequences and series.  Throughout the year, we will approach the mathematics algebraically, graphically, numerically, and verbally. Student-centered pedagogies will be used and collaborative learning will be emphasized. If you have questions about your readiness to take this class, please contact the faculty. Vauhn Foster-Grahler Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Allen Mauney
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening W 14Winter This class continues the calculus sequence after Calculus I. The main focus of the class will be on applications of the integral, especially on problems from the physical sciences. The definite integral will be defined intuitively as the area under a curve and rigorously as the limit of partial sums. Techniques of anti-differentiation including u-substitution, parts, trigonometric integrals, trigonometric substitutions, and partial fraction decompostition will be thoroughly covered. Additional topics will include polar coordinates and parametric functions. Allen Mauney Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening S 14Spring This class will apply the derivative and integral to phenomena best modeled by vector and multi-variable functions. The derivative will be used to determine motion in space, and the partial derivative will be used to calculate gradients. Vector-valued and parametrically defined functions will be used to approach problems in a way very well suited to questions in the physical sciences. Some geometry will be covered using the dot and cross products. Taylor series will be used to approximate and represent functions. Students will do online work, solve problems collaboratively, and write exams.  Allen Mauney Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring
Neal Nelson, Paul Pham, Sheryl Shulman and Richard Weiss
Signature Required: Winter  Spring 
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring The goal of this program is for students to learn the intellectual concepts and skills that are essential for advanced work in computer science and beneficial for computing work in support of other disciplines. Students will have the opportunity to achieve a deeper understanding of increasingly complex computing systems by acquiring knowledge and skills in mathematical abstraction, problem solving and the organization and analysis of hardware and software systems. The program covers material such as algorithms, data structures, computer organization and architecture, logic, discrete mathematics and programming in the context of the liberal arts and compatible with the model curriculum developed by the Association for Computing Machinery's Liberal Arts Computer Science Consortium.The program content will be organized around four interwoven themes. The computational organization theme covers concepts and structures of computing systems from digital logic to the computer architecture supporting high level languages and operating systems. The programming theme concentrates on learning how to design and code programs to solve problems. The mathematical theme helps develop mathematical reasoning, theoretical abstractions and problem-solving skills needed for computer scientists. A technology and society theme explores social, historical or philosophical topics related to science and technology.We will explore these themes throughout the year through lectures, programming labs, workshops, and seminars.  computer science, education and mathematics. Neal Nelson Paul Pham Sheryl Shulman Richard Weiss Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Arun Chandra
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 14Summer Session I This course will focus on using the computer to create and manipulate digitally generated waveforms.  Students will learn how to use the "C" programming language to synthesize waveforms, while learning about their mathematics.  Students will create short compositions using FM, additive synthesis, and other synthesis techniques.  We will listen to contemporary and historical experiments in sound synthesis and composition, and students will be asked to write a short paper on synthesis algorithms.  Students will learn how to program in "C" under a Linux or OS X system.  The overall emphasis of this class will be in learning how to address the computer in a spirit of play and experiment, and find out what composition can become.  There will be weekly readings in aesthetics, and contemporary research in music composition. Arun Chandra Mon Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Brian Walter
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su 14Summer Session I In this course, we'll study standard topics in discrete mathematics, including: logic and proof; sets, relations, and functions; combinatorics; basic probability; and graph theory.  Along the way, we'll focus on skills and techniques for problem-solving.  This is an excellent course for teachers and future teachers, people wanting to broaden their mathematical experience beyond algebra, and students considering advanced study in mathematics and/or computer science. Brian Walter Mon Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Emily Lardner and Allen Mauney
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Evening W 14Winter S 14Spring The skills to design and conduct effective research—defined as systematic inquiry-- are essential components of a liberal arts education and professional work. In this program, students will develop strong writing, critical reading, and statistical reasoning skills applicable to a variety of fields. The program is organized around two core assumptions: first, that research is more about thinking than doing, and second, that good research uses appropriate methods to support claims and communicate results effectively. In winter quarter, we will use the broad topic of climate change—understanding it, preparing for it, and adapting to it—as a shared focus for developing research skills. Students will focus on aspects of climate change that connect with their previous and future studies, or their current interests. Students will build skills through active-learning workshops, hands-on data collection and analysis, and critical analysis of online and print media reports. We will discuss research articles from a variety of fields, noting what makes some articles effective and others less so. In the second quarter of the program, students will be invited to identify their own topics for investigation, and continue to develop research tools and methods.The goal of the program is to help students become good researchers—good at asking and answering questions about complex topics in systematic ways. We expect that students will come to the program with a variety of backgrounds—from little or no experience with quantitative reasoning and statistics to some background, and from limited writing experience to lots of it. Successful students in this program will be intellectually curious and keen to become better at asking and answering good questions.   Emily Lardner Allen Mauney Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter Spring
Neal Nelson
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su 14Summer Session I This class is an introduction to both Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry suitable for teachers or others interested in gaining a deeper understanding of mathematics, mathematical proof, and the historical and conceptual evolution of geometrical ideas. The course will concentrate on problem solving and the development of mathematical skills, particularly proofs, with the goal of understanding the major conceptual developments in the history of geometry. Class activities will be primarily reading, problem solving, and discussion with lectures as needed. The course is suitable for middle and secondary math endorsements. Neal Nelson Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Richard Weiss and Diego de Acosta
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall This program links together computer science and linguistics through the written forms and grammars of languages. First, we’ll consider writing: what do the world’s alphabets, syllabaries and pictographic writing systems tell us about the structure of human languages? Are some writing systems particularly appropriate for some languages, or is it possible to represent any language with any writing system? Ciphers deliberately conceal information without removing it. What does cryptography tell us about the nature of information?Second, we’ll look at the grammars of human and computer languages. The syntax of a computer language can be described precisely, while human languages have exceptions. Yet there have been many attempts to model human language with computers, and to create ways for computers to “read” and “listen” to human languages. To what extent have automatic translation programs and Internet search engines been successful? Why is it that humans can handle ambiguity, but computers have such a difficult time?Major topics of the programStudents will participate in lectures, seminar, labs and workshops on linguistics, programming and computation. They will be evaluated on quizzes, exams, papers and programs.  Richard Weiss Diego de Acosta Mon Tue Wed Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Paul McCreary
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su 14Summer Session I Each student will begin working where their current skill level is. Appropriate skill levels for the course include algebra, calculus, and any in between. We will directly confront the fears and phobias that many of us feel and help to move beyond those fears. All students will support each other and also receive tutoring help from other students in the class. Because different texts will be used for different students, please contact the instructor before purchasing a text.This course will count towards requirements for becoming elementary, middle, or high school teachers. Students registering for 4 credits will attend only Wednesday through Friday. Paul McCreary Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Brian Walter
Signature Required: Winter  Spring 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring This program is built around intensive study of several fundamental areas of pure mathematics. Covered topics are likely to include abstract algebra, real analysis, set theory, combinatorics and probability.The work in this advanced-level mathematics program is quite likely to differ from students' previous work in mathematics, including calculus, in a number of ways. We will emphasize the careful understanding of the definitions of mathematical terms and the statements and proofs of the theorems that capture the main conceptual landmarks in the areas we study. Hence, the largest portion of our work will involve the reading and writing of rigorous proofs in axiomatic systems. These skills are valuable not only for continued study of mathematics but also in many areas of thought in which arguments are set forth according to strict criteria for logical deduction. Students will gain experience in articulating their evidence for claims and in expressing their ideas with precise and transparent reasoning.In addition to work in core areas of advanced mathematics, we will devote seminar time to looking at our studies in a broader historical, philosophical, and cultural context, working toward answers to critical questions such as: Are mathematical systems discovered or created? Do mathematical objects actually exist? How did the current mode of mathematical thinking come to be developed? What is current mathematical practice? What are the connections between mathematics and culture? What are the connections between mathematics and art? What are the connections between mathematics and literature?This program is designed for students who intend to pursue graduate studies or teach in mathematics and the sciences, as well as for those who want to know more about mathematical thinking. Brian Walter Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Sara Sunshine Campbell
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 8 08 Day Su 14Summer Full Sara Sunshine Campbell Tue Tue Thu Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Sara Sunshine Campbell
  Course JR–SRJunior - Senior 4 04 Day Su 14Summer Session I This class focuses on the mathematical content knowledge teachers and parents need in order to teach elementary and middle school mathematics. Students will develop their content knowledge in number theory (base-ten and place value, whole number operations, fractions, fraction operations, factors and multiples, proportional reasoning) and Algebra (algebra as generalized arithmetic, algebraic manipulation, linear and non-linear functions). Through this mathematical content and an examination of the Common Core State Standards, students will develop their own mathematical thinking, reasoning, and justification skills. This program is appropriate for students who intend to enroll in The Evergreen State College Master in Teaching Program or other teacher education programs and current teachers and parents who wish to further develop their understanding of mathematics.  Sara Sunshine Campbell Tue Wed Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Clyde Barlow and Neil Switz
Signature Required: Winter  Spring 
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Modern science has been remarkably successful in providing understanding of how natural systems behave. Such disparate phenomena as the workings of cell-phones, the ways in which we detect supermassive black holes in the galactic core, the use of magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of disease, the effects of global carbon dioxide levels on shellfish growth, and the design of batteries for electric cars are all linked at a deeply fundamental level. This program will introduce you to the theory and practice of the science behind these and other phenomena, while providing the solid academic background in mathematics, chemistry, and physics necessary for advanced study in those fields as well as for engineering, medicine, and biology.We will integrate material from first-year university physics, chemistry, and calculus with relevant areas of history and scientific literature.  The program will have a strong laboratory focus using computer-based experimental control and analysis to explore the nature of chemical and physical systems; this work will take place in a highly collaborative environment.  Seminars will provide the opportunity to explore the connections between theory and practice and will provide opportunities to enhance technical writing and communication skills. The program is intended for students with solid high-school level backgrounds in science and mathematics, but the key to succeeding will be a commitment to work, learn, and collaborate. Clyde Barlow Neil Switz Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Rip Heminway and Sheryl Shulman
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Contract JR–SRJunior - Senior 8 08 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring The Computer Science Intern develops skills in advanced topics of Computer Science through the coordination of the Operating Systems Lab (OSL). This intern develops advanced skills in operating systems, cluster computing, system administration and network topology design. The intern assists with lab coordination, hardware and software upgrades, creating instructional materials and lab documentation, and provides users with technical assistance computer science and technology. Rip Heminway Sheryl Shulman Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Krishna Chowdary and Neal Nelson
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 12 12 Day W 14Winter This introductory program integrates mathematics and physics through hands-on, applied, and collaborative work. We particularly invite students who are interested in future studies in introductory science, but are uncertain of their mathematical skills or have had challenging experiences with math in the past and want to create positive ones. We also welcome students who are interested in science as part of their broad liberal arts education. We aim to develop a supportive, hard-working, and playful community of learners who gain practice in some of the ways that scientists make sense of the natural and human-created worlds. One way that people make sense of their world is by . We approach the study of patterns from two complementary points of view: the of patterns and the of patterns. We will study mathematics as a language of patterns that unifies these viewpoints. As students discover and generate patterns in lab and workshop, we will develop and identify mathematical structures that describe and help make sense of those patterns. We will use computing to develop and play with mathematical models, generating patterns that we can observe and compare with physical phenomena, enjoy for their beauty, and that can lead to surprising behavior and forms. We will spend significant time in collaborative science and math labs and workshops, where we will question, experiment, observe, estimate, measure, describe, compute, model, read, interpret, abstract, conjecture, discuss, convince, and most of all, create.Students will have the opportunity to improve their capacities as quantitatively and scientifically literate citizens, including reading and creating scientific texts, solving theoretical and applied problems, and communicating creatively and effectively. Students will develop and demonstrate their learning through in-class work, homework assignments, papers, and quizzes. Students who successfully complete this program will have covered the equivalent of one quarter of math (college algebra or pre-calculus) and physics (conceptual or algebra-based), and will be prepared for further introductory science programs such as Computer Science Foundations, Introduction to Natural Science, or Models of Motion. Krishna Chowdary Neal Nelson Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Krishna Chowdary, Mario Gadea and Neal Nelson
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 12 12 Day S 14Spring This introductory program integrates mathematics and physics through hands-on, applied, and collaborative work. We particularly invite students who are interested in future studies in introductory science, but are uncertain of their mathematical skills or have had challenging experiences with math in the past and want to create positive ones. We also welcome students who are interested in science as part of their broad liberal arts education. We aim to develop a supportive, hard-working, and playful community of learners who gain practice in some of the ways that scientists make sense of the natural and human-created worlds. One way that people make sense of their world is by . We approach the study of patterns from two complementary points of view: the of patterns and the of patterns. We will study mathematics as a language of patterns that unifies these viewpoints. As students discover and generate patterns in lab and workshop, we will develop and identify mathematical structures that describe and help make sense of those patterns. We will use computing to develop and play with mathematical models, generating patterns that we can observe and compare with physical phenomena, enjoy for their beauty, and that can lead to surprising behavior and forms. We will spend significant time in collaborative science and math labs and workshops, where we will question, experiment, observe, estimate, measure, describe, compute, model, read, interpret, abstract, conjecture, discuss, convince, and most of all, create.Students will have the opportunity to improve their capacities as quantitatively and scientifically literate citizens, including reading and creating scientific texts, solving theoretical and applied problems, and communicating creatively and effectively. Students will develop and demonstrate their learning through in-class work, homework assignments, papers, and quizzes. Students who successfully complete this program will have covered the equivalent of one quarter of math (college algebra or pre-calculus) and physics (conceptual or algebra-based), and will be prepared for further introductory science programs such as Computer Science Foundations, Introduction to Natural Science, or Models of Motion. Krishna Chowdary Mario Gadea Neal Nelson Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Allen Mauney
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 8 08 Evening F 13 Fall Physics is concerned with the basic principles of the universe. It is the foundation on which engineering, technology, and other sciences are based. The science of physics has developed out of the efforts of men and women to explain our physical environment. These efforts have been so successful that the laws of physics now encompass a remarkable variety of phenomena. One of the exciting features of physics is its capacity for predicting how nature will behave in one situation on the basis of experimental data obtained in another situation. In this program we will begin the process of understanding the underlying order of the physical world by modeling physical systems using both the analytical tools of calculus and the numerical tools provided by digital computers. We will also have significant laboratory experience to make predictions and explore some of these models. In this thematically-integrated program, students will cover calculus and algebra-based physics through small-group discussions, interactive lectures, and laboratory investigations. In physics, we will learn about motion, energy, models, and the process for constructing them. Through our study of calculus, we will learn how to analyze these models mathematically. We will study some of Galileo's significant contributions to classical mechanics, Kepler's astronomical observations, Newton's work on calculus and laws of motion, Euler's applications of calculus to the study of real-life problems in physics (magnetism, optics and acoustics), Maxwell's development of the unified theory of magnetism, Einstein’s relativity, and many others. This program will cover many of the traditional topics of both first-quarter calculus and first-quarter physics. Covering these topics together allows for the many connections between them to be reinforced while helping make clear the value of each. Allen Mauney Mon Wed Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
EJ Zita
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 14Summer Session II Fires and floods in Colorado, Australia, and worldwide ... Hurricanes and typhoons moving  further north and getting stronger ... Mega-tornados, with extended tornado seasons and ranges ... What about tsunamis, earthquakes, and solar magnetic storms?  What is extreme weather?  What causes it?  Is it really getting worse?  Is extreme weather related to global warming?   We will learn algebra-based thermodynamics, mechanics, and Earth science to address questions such as these.  We will seminar on recent writings.  Students will contribute case studies from news and science articles, and will actively engage in a writing community with peers.  Much of the program will be online, and we will meet for lectures and workshops.  This course provides entrance requirements for degree programs such as MIT. Prerequisites: mastery of high school algebra,  good reading and writing skills, willingness to work in teams, ability to use computers and Internet for independent work online.  No physics prerequisite. EJ Zita Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Allen Mauney
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Evening and Weekend Su 14Summer Session I The class will begin with an intense review of precalculus material most relevant to calculus. Students are expected to have had some experience with graphs and functions and trigonometry. Calculus topics will include limits, continuity, the limit definition of the derivative, differentiation rules, maxima and minima, optimization problems, Mean Value Theorem, Newton's method, and anti-differentiation. Emphasis throughout will be on modeling problems in the physical world. Students will work homework online, write exams, work in teams, and give verbal presentations of their results to the class. Allen Mauney Mon Wed Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Vauhn Foster-Grahler
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day W 14Winter S 14Spring This two-quarter sequence of courses will prepare students for calculus and more advanced mathematics.  It is a good course for students who have recently had a college-level math class or at least three years of high school math.  Students should enter the class with a good knowledge of supporting algebra.  Winter quarter will include an in-depth study of linear, quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic functions.  Spring will include an in-depth study of trigonometric and rational functions in addition to parametric equations, polar coordinates, and operations on functions.  Collaborative learning, data analysis and approaching problems from multiple perspectives (algebraically, numerically, graphically, and verbally) will be emphasized.   Vauhn Foster-Grahler Mon Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter Spring
Tyrus Smith
  Course JR–SRJunior - Senior 4 04 Day Su 14Summer Session I This course will explore the interdisciplinary use of quantitative reasoning and statistics to analyze social and environmental issues and problems.  Course content will focus on increasing students understanding of quantitative research design, specifically the methods and procedures for data analysis and visual presentation of data. Within this context, students will demonstrate the ability to correctly calculate and interpret descriptive and inferential statistics. This includes learning how to select and apply appropriate statistical tests. The statistical tests introduced in this course include: Chi-Square, correlation and regression analysis. Student work will consist of in class workshops, take-home assignments and computer exercises. Tyrus Smith Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Chris Portmann
  Course JR–SRJunior - Senior 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall This course will focus on research design issues related to the social sciences including types of studies, sampling, data collection techniques, research ethics, and report writing.  Additionally, the course will cover data analysis and presentation strategies including measures of central tendency and parametric testing (e.g., t-test, ANOVA, Pearson Correlation). This course is intended to complement the weekend program , but it can be taken as a stand-alone course. Chris Portmann Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Peter Dorman
  Program JR–SRJunior - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring There are of poor people in the world today, and even more who have limited access to health care, education and political and cultural opportunities. The word commonly used to refer to the process of economic growth and the expansion of opportunity is development—but there is enormous disagreement over how this word should be understood or even whether it should be used at all. This program will examine development on multiple levels: historical, philosophical, political and economic. It will place the quest for development in the context of European colonial expansion, military conflict and the tension between competing cultural frameworks. In doing this, it will combine “outside” views of development, as seen by administrators and experts, with the “inside” views of people who are most directly affected by development and its absence. At the same time, there will be a strong push toward usable knowledge: learning the skills that are essential for people who work in the field of development and want to make a dent in this radically unequal world. Economics will be an important contributor to our knowledge base; the program will offer introductory-level micro- and macroeconomics, with examples drawn from the development experience. Just as important is statistics, since quantitative methods have become indispensable in development work. We will learn about survey methodology and techniques used to analyze data. Another basis for this program is the belief that economics, politics and lived experience are inseparable. Just as quantitative techniques are used to shed light on people’s experiences, their own voices are essential for making sense of the numbers and can sometimes overrule them altogether. We will read literature that expresses the perspective of writers from non-Western countries, view films and consider other forms of testimony. The goal is to see the world, as much as possible, through their eyes as well as ours.Spring quarter will be devoted primarily to research. It will begin with a short, intensive training in research methods, based on the strategy of deeply analyzing a few papers to see how their authors researched and wrote them. After this, depending on the skills and interests of students, an effort will be made to place them as assistants to professional researchers or, if they prefer, they can pursue their own projects. We will meet as a group periodically to discuss emerging trends in development research and practice, as well as to help each other cope with the difficulties in our own work. By the end of three quarters, students should be prepared for internships or further professional studies in this field. Peter Dorman Mon Mon Wed Thu Thu Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Alvin Josephy
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening Su 14Summer Session II How strange is the weather this year, anyway? Can we explain the broad die-off of conifers across the Rocky Mountains? How about spending tax-payers' money to provide a hot breakfast to school kids in the morning? Is it “worth it”? The answers to these questions lie in our ability to understand data. Statistics is the tool we use to understand that data. The goal of this class will be to involve the student in exploring how Statistics is used to explain natural phenomena, promote public policy, and tell us things about the world that we can never know without it. Alvin Josephy Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Ralph Murphy
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening Su 14Summer Session I This class covers key statistical concepts at the conceptual and computational level with an emphasis on how statistics is used in research in natural and social sciences.  Important elements of research design are covered in the class. Descriptive and inferential statistical tests are covered including scales of data, measures of central tendency, normal distributions, probability, chi square, correlation and linear regression, tests of hypothesis, and Type I and Type II errors. Students will develop a clear understanding of introductory statistics and the ability to correctly interpret findings in journals, newspapers, and books. The class meets the statistics prerequisite for MES and MPA programs at Evergreen and most other graduate schools with a statistics prerequisite. Ralph Murphy Mon Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Carrie Margolin
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 8 08 Day Su 14Summer Session I This course provides a concentrated overview of the statistics and research methodology required for the GRE and prerequisites for graduate schools in psychology, education, and other social sciences. We emphasize hands-on, intuitive knowledge and approach statistics as a language rather than as math alone; thus this course is gentle on "math phobics."  No computer skills are required. You will become an informed and savvy consumer of information, from the classroom to the workplace. We will cover descriptive and inferential statistics, research methodology and ethics. psychology, social services, health care, education Carrie Margolin Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Wenhong Wang
  Program FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Day Su 14Summer Session II Hardly a day goes by without dealing with some types of numbers. How do you make sense of those numbers? How can you tell which is right and which is wrong? How can we use statistical tools to inform, to explore and to empower? What are the larger frameworks behind those numbers? How do we use the theory to direct our quantitive reasoning and how do we use quantitative tools to enhance our understanding of the society? This class will put statistics into context. We will cover basic sociological concepts and theories and introduce students to basic statistics. Focus will be placed on real life scenarios and sense-making practices. Besides workshops and lectures, we will conduct social experiments and field work to get our feet wet in social scientific research. Wenhong Wang Tue Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Summer Summer
Alvin Josephy
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall This course is an introduction to statistics for students with limited mathematical skills, little if any formal exposure to data and data analysis, and no experience with statistics.  This class will introduce the student to the statistical process, including data collection, ways of organizing data, an introduction to data analysis, and an opportunity to learn how practitioners present their findings.  We will examine several case studies, explore how data is used in explaining common events, and develop a more critical understanding about how statistics allows us to understand the world around us.  (Note: Please bring a calculator.) Alvin Josephy Tue Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Alvin Josephy
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening W 14Winter This course is an introduction to statistics for students with limited mathematical skills, little if any formal exposure to data and data analysis, and no experience with statistics.  This class will introduce the student to the statistical process, including data collection, ways of organizing data, an introduction to data analysis, and an opportunity to learn how practitioners present their findings.  We will examine several case studies, explore how data is used in explaining common events, and develop a more critical understanding about how statistics allows us to understand the world around us.  (Note: Please bring a calculator.) Alvin Josephy Mon Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Alvin Josephy
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening S 14Spring This course is an introduction to statistics for students with limited mathematical skills, little if any formal exposure to data and data analysis, and no experience with statistics.  This class will introduce the student to the statistical process, including data collection, ways of organizing data, an introduction to data analysis, and an opportunity to learn how practitioners present their findings.  We will examine several case studies, explore how data is used in explaining common events, and develop a more critical understanding about how statistics allows us to understand the world around us.  (Note: Please bring a calculator.) Alvin Josephy Mon Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Allen Mauney
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening F 13 Fall This course is an introduction to statistics for students with limited mathematical skills, little if any formal exposure to data and data analysis, and no experience with statistics.  This class will introduce the student to the statistical process, including data collection, ways of organizing data, an introduction to data analysis, and an opportunity to learn how practitioners present their findings.  We will examine several case studies, explore how data is used in explaining common events, and develop a more critical understanding about how statistics allows us to understand the world around us.  (Note: Please bring a calculator.) Allen Mauney Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall
Alvin Josephy
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Weekend W 14Winter This course is an introduction to Statistics for students with limited, if any formal exposure to data and data analysis, and no formal experience with Statistics.  This class will introduce the student to the statistical process, including data collection, ways of organizing data, an introduction to data analysis, and an opportunity to learn how practitioners present their findings.  We will discuss several case studies and problems, explore how data is used in explaining common and unusual events, and develop a more critical understanding about how statistics helps us to understand the world around us. Alvin Josephy Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Alvin Josephy
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Weekend S 14Spring This course is an introduction to Statistics for students with limited, if any formal exposure to data and data analysis, and no formal experience with Statistics.  This class will introduce the student to the statistical process, including data collection, ways of organizing data, an introduction to data analysis, and an opportunity to learn how practitioners present their findings.  We will discuss several case studies and problems, explore how data is used in explaining common and unusual events, and develop a more critical understanding about how statistics helps us to understand the world around us. Alvin Josephy Sat Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Allen Mauney
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening S 14Spring This course is an introduction to statistics for students with limited mathematical skills, little if any formal exposure to data and data analysis, and no experience with statistics.  This class will introduce the student to the statistical process, including data collection, ways of organizing data, an introduction to data analysis, and an opportunity to learn how practitioners present their findings.  We will examine several case studies, explore how data is used in explaining common events, and develop a more critical understanding about how statistics allows us to understand the world around us.  (Note: Please bring a calculator.) Allen Mauney Thu Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Alvin Josephy
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening W 14Winter In this class we will explore the concepts of inferential statistics. This class assumes that the student has a prior background in descriptive statistics. The class will discuss probability, especially in terms of probability distributions, and move on to hypothesis testing. In this context, the class will work with several distributions, such as t, chi square, F as well as the normal distribution, and work with ANOVA and multiple regression. The class will finish with an introduction to non-parametric statistics. In addition, the students will consider journal articles and research concepts, and will prepare a small presentation using the concepts from the class. Alvin Josephy Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Winter Winter
Alvin Josephy
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 4 04 Evening S 14Spring In this class we will explore the concepts of inferential statistics. This class assumes that the student has a prior background in descriptive statistics. The class will discuss probability, especially in terms of probability distributions, and move on to hypothesis testing. In this context, the class will work with several distributions, such as t, chi square, F as well as the normal distribution, and work with ANOVA and multiple regression. The class will finish with an introduction to non-parametric statistics. In addition, the students will consider journal articles and research concepts, and will prepare a small presentation using the concepts from the class. Alvin Josephy Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Neal Nelson, Judith Cushing, Richard Weiss and Sheryl Shulman
Signature Required: Fall  Winter 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior 16 16 Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring The successful completion of large software systems requires strong technical skills, good design and competent management. Unfortunately, unlike hardware, software systems have proven to be notoriously difficult to build on-time, in-budget, and reliable, despite the best efforts of many very smart people over the last 50 years. This is an upper-division program intended to help students gain the technical knowledge required to understand, analyze, modify and build complex software systems.We will concentrate on learning the organization and complexity of large software systems that we do understand, and gaining practical experience in order to achieve a deeper understanding of the art, science, collaboration and multi-disciplinary skills required to develop computing solutions in real-world application domains. The technical topics will be selected from data structures, algorithm analysis, operating systems, networks, information security, object oriented design and analysis, verification techniques, scientific visualization and modeling. The program seminar will focus on various technical topics in the software industry. Students will have an opportunity to engage in a substantial computing project through all the development phases of proposal, requirements, specification, design and implementation.This program is for advanced computer science students who satisfy the prerequisites. We also expect students to have the discipline, intellectual maturity and self motivation to identify their project topics, organize project teams and resources and complete advanced work independently. Neal Nelson Judith Cushing Richard Weiss Sheryl Shulman Mon Tue Wed Thu Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter
Vauhn Foster-Grahler
  Course FR–SRFreshmen - Senior 2 02 Day S 14Spring Tutoring Math and Science For Social Justice will include an examination of some of the current research on the teaching and learning of math and science in higher education and will focus this knowledge on its implications for and applications to diverse groups of learners and social justice. Students will experience and evaluate a variety of tutoring strategies as a student and as a facilitator. This class is strongly suggested for students who are planning on teaching math and/or science or who would like to tutor in Evergreen's Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning Center. Vauhn Foster-Grahler Wed Freshmen FR Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Spring Spring
Paula Schofield, Neil Switz, David McAvity, Andrew Brabban, Brian Walter, Richard Weiss, Abir Biswas, Michael Paros, Clyde Barlow, Judith Cushing, Dharshi Bopegedera, Rebecca Sunderman, EJ Zita, Donald Morisato, Clarissa Dirks, James Neitzel, Sheryl Shulman, Neal Nelson and Lydia McKinstry
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Program SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Scientific Inquiry. Research opportunities allow science students to work on specific projects associated with faculty members’ expertise. Students typically begin by working in an apprenticeship model with faculty or laboratory staff and gradually take on more independent projects within the context of the specific research program as they gain experience. Students can develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, modeling and theoretical analysis, written and oral communication, collaboration and critical thinking. These are valuable skills for students pursuing a graduate degree or entering the job market.Faculty offering undergraduate research opportunities are listed below. Contact them directly if you are interested. (chemistry) works with biophysical applications of spectroscopy to study physiological processes at the organ level, with direct applications to health problems. Students with backgrounds in biology, chemistry, physics, mathematics or computer science can obtain practical experience in applying their backgrounds to biomedical research problems in an interdisciplinary laboratory environment.. (geology, earth science) studies nutrient and toxic trace metal cycles in terrestrial and coastal ecosystems. Potential projects could include studies of mineral weathering, wildfires and mercury cycling in ecosystems. Students could pursue these interests at the laboratory-scale or through field-scale biogeochemistry studies taking advantage of the Evergreen Ecological Observation Network (EEON), a long-term ecological study area. Students with backgrounds in a combination of geology, biology or chemistry could gain skills in soil, vegetation and water collection and learn methods of sample preparation and analysis for major and trace elements. (biotechnology) studies the physiology and biochemistry of prokaryotes of industrial and agricultural importance. Students who commit at least a full year to a research project, enrolling for 4 to 16 credits each quarter, will learn a broad range of microbiology (both aerobic and anaerobic techniques), molecular (DNA analysis and cloning), and biochemical techniques (chemical and pathway analysis, protein isolation). Students will also have opportunities for internships at the USDA and elsewhere, and to present data at national and international conferences. (chemistry) would like to engage students in two projects. (1) Quantitative determination of metals in the stalactites formed in aging concrete using ICP-MS. Students who are interested in learning about the ICP-MS technique and using it for quantitative analysis will find this project interesting. (2) Science and education. We will work with local teachers to develop lab activities that enhance the science curriculum in local schools. Students who have an interest in teaching science and who have completed general chemistry with laboratory would be ideal for this project. (computer science, ecology informatics) studies how scientists might better use information technology and visualization in their research, particularly in ecology and environmental studies. She would like to work with students who have a background in computer science or one of the sciences (e.g., ecology, biology, chemistry or physics), and who are motivated to explore how new computing paradigms can be harnessed to improve the individual and collaborative work of scientists. Such technologies include visualizations, plugins, object-oriented systems, new database technologies and "newer" languages that scientists themselves use such as python or R. (biology) aims to better understand the evolutionary principles that underlie the emergence, spread and containment of infectious disease by studying the coevolution of retroviruses and their primate hosts. Studying how host characteristics and ecological changes influence virus transmission in lemurs will enable us to address the complex spatial and temporal factors that impact emerging diseases. Students with a background in biology and chemistry will gain experience in molecular biology techniques, including tissue culture and the use of viral vectors. (organic chemistry) is interested in organic synthesis research, including asymmetric synthesis methodology, chemical reaction dynamics and small molecule synthesis. One specific study involves the design and synthesis of enzyme inhibitor molecules to be used as effective laboratory tools with which to study the mechanistic steps of programmed cell death (e.g., in cancer cells). Students with a background in organic chemistry and biology will gain experience with the laboratory techniques of organic synthesis as well as the techniques of spectroscopy. (biology) is interested in the developmental biology of the embryo, a model system for analyzing how patterning occurs. Maternally encoded signaling pathways establish the anterior-posterior and dorsal-ventral axes. Individual student projects will use a combination of genetic, molecular biological and biochemical approaches to investigate the spatial regulation of this complex process. (biochemistry) uses methods from organic and analytical chemistry to study biologically interesting molecules. A major focus of his current work is on fatty acids; in particular, finding spectroscopic and chromatographic methods to identify fatty acids in complex mixtures and to detect changes that occur in fats during processing or storage. This has relevance both for foods and in biodiesel production. The other major area of interest is in plant natural products, such as salicylates. Work is in process screening local plants for the presence of these molecules, which are important plant defense signals. Work is also supported in determining the nutritional value of indigenous plants. Students with a background and interest in organic, analytical or biochemistry could contribute to this work. (computer science) and (computer science) are interested in working with advanced computer topics and current problems in the application of computing to the sciences. Their areas of interest include simulations of advanced architectures for distributed computing, advanced programming languages and compilers, programming languages for concurrent and parallel computing and hardware modeling languages. (biology, veterinary medicine) is interested in animal health and diseases that affect the animal agriculture industry. Currently funded research includes the development of bacteriophage therapy for dairy cattle uterine infections, calf salmonellosis and mastitis. A number of hands-on laboratory projects are available to students interested in pursuing careers in science. (organic, polymer, materials chemistry) is interested in the interdisciplinary fields of biodegradable plastics and biomedical polymers. Research in the field of biodegradable plastics is becoming increasingly important to replace current petroleum-derived materials and to reduce the environmental impact of plastic wastes. Modification of starch through copolymerization and use of bacterial polyesters show promise in this endeavor. Specific projects within biomedical polymers involve the synthesis of poly (lactic acid) copolymers that have potential for use in tissue engineering. Students with a background in chemistry and biology will gain experience in the synthesis and characterization of these novel polymer materials. Students will present their work at American Chemical Society (ACS) conferences. (computer science) is interested in working with advanced computer topics and current problems in the application of computing to the sciences. Her areas of interest include simulations of advanced architectures for distributed computing, advanced programming languages and compilers, programming languages for concurrent and parallel computing, and hardware modeling languages. (inorganic/materials chemistry, physical chemistry) is interested in the synthesis and property characterization of new bismuth-containing materials. These compounds have been characterized as electronic conductors, attractive activators for luminescent materials, second harmonic generators and oxidation catalysts for several organic compounds. Traditional solid-state synthesis methods will be utilized to prepare new complex bismuth oxides. Once synthesized, powder x-ray diffraction patterns will be obtained and material properties such as conductivity, melting point, biocidal tendency, coherent light production and magnetic behavior will be examined when appropriate. (mathematics) is interested in problems relating to graphs, combinatorial games and especially combinatorial games played on graphs. He would like to work with students who have a strong background in mathematics and/or computer science and who are interested in applying their skills to open-ended problems relating to graphs and/or games. (computer science, mathematics) has several ongoing projects in computer vision, robotics and security. There are some opportunities for students to develop cybersecurity games for teaching network security concepts and skills. In robotics, he is looking for students to develop laboratory exercises for several different mobile robotic platforms, including Scribbler, LEGO NXT and iRobot Create. This would also involve writing tools for image processing and computer vision using sequences of still images, video streams and 2.5-D images from the Kinect. In addition, he is open to working with students who have their own ideas for projects in these and related areas, such as machine learning, artificial intelligence and analysis of processor performance. (physics) studies the Sun and the Earth. What are the mechanisms of global warming? What can we expect in the future? What can we do about it right now? How do solar changes affect Earth over decades (e.g., Solar Max) to millennia? Why does the Sun shine a bit more brightly when it is more magnetically active, even though sunspots are dark? Why does the Sun's magnetic field flip every 11 years? Why is the temperature of the Sun’s outer atmosphere millions of degrees higher than that of its surface? Students can do research related to global warming in Zita's academic programs and in contracts, and have investigated the Sun by analyzing data from solar observatories and using theory and computer modeling. Serious students are encouraged to form research contracts and may thereafter be invited to join our research team. Please go to the catalog view for specific information about each option. Paula Schofield Neil Switz David McAvity Andrew Brabban Brian Walter Richard Weiss Abir Biswas Michael Paros Clyde Barlow Judith Cushing Dharshi Bopegedera Rebecca Sunderman EJ Zita Donald Morisato Clarissa Dirks James Neitzel Sheryl Shulman Neal Nelson Lydia McKinstry Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Brian Walter
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Scientific Inquiry. Research opportunities allow science students to work on specific projects associated with faculty members’ expertise. Students typically begin by working in an apprenticeship model with faculty or laboratory staff and gradually take on more independent projects within the context of the specific research program as they gain experience. Students can develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, modeling and theoretical analysis, written and oral communication, collaboration and critical thinking. These are valuable skills for students pursuing a graduate degree or entering the job market. (mathematics) is interested in problems relating to graphs, combinatorial games and especially combinatorial games played on graphs. He would like to work with students who have a strong background in mathematics and/or computer science and who are interested in applying their skills to open-ended problems relating to graphs and/or games. Brian Walter Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
David McAvity
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Scientific Inquiry. This independent learning opportunity allows advanced students to delve into real-world research with faculty who are currently engaged in specific projects. Students typically begin by working in apprenticeship with faculty or laboratory staff and gradually take on more independent projects within the context of the specific research program as they gain experience. Students can develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, written and oral communication, collaboration, and critical thinking that are valuable for students pursuing a graduate degree or entering the job market. (mathematics) is interested in problems in mathematical biology associated with population and evolutionary dynamics. Students working with him will help create computer simulations using agent-based modeling and cellular automata and analyzing non-linear models for the evolution of cooperative behavior in strategic multiplayer evolutionary games. Students should have a strong mathematics or computer science background. theoretical biology, computer science, mathematics. David McAvity Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring
Richard Weiss
Signature Required: Fall  Winter  Spring 
  Research SO–SRSophomore - Senior V V Day F 13 Fall W 14Winter S 14Spring Rigorous quantitative and qualitative research is an important component of academic learning in Scientific Inquiry. Research opportunities allow science students to work on specific projects associated with faculty members’ expertise. Students typically begin by working in an apprenticeship model with faculty or laboratory staff and gradually take on more independent projects within the context of the specific research program as they gain experience. Students can develop vital skills in research design, data acquisition and interpretation, modeling and theoretical analysis, written and oral communication, collaboration and critical thinking. These are valuable skills for students pursuing a graduate degree or entering the job market. (computer science, mathematics) has several ongoing projects in computer vision, robotics and security. There are some opportunities for students to develop cybersecurity games for teaching network security concepts and skills. In robotics, he is looking for students to develop laboratory exercises for several different mobile robotic platforms, including Scribbler, LEGO NXT and iRobot Create. This would also involve writing tools for image processing and computer vision using sequences of still images, video streams and 2.5-D images from the Kinect. In addition, he is open to working with students who have their own ideas for projects in these and related areas, such as machine learning, artificial intelligence and analysis of processor performance. Richard Weiss Sophomore SO Junior JR Senior SR Fall Fall Winter Spring