Institutional Research and Assessment

01-02 Common Data Set

College Board's Common Data Set for 2001-02

(abridged)

Undergraduate Information

  1. General Information

Name of College or University

The Evergreen State College

Mailing Address

2700 Evergreen Parkway NW

 

Olympia, WA 98505

WWW Home Page Address

www.evergreen.edu

Main Phone

(360) 866-6000

Admissions Phone Number

(360) 867-6170

Admissions Fax Number

(360) 867-6576

Admissions E-mail Address

admissions@evergreen.edu

College Nickname

Evergreen

College Team Name

Geoducks

Source of Institutional Control

Public

Number of Years of Undergraduate Education

Four years

Class of Institution

Coeducational

Location of Institution

Small City located 60 miles south of Seattle,

 

campus is 6 miles from downtown Olympia

Campus Environment

Rural

Academic Year

Quarter

Do you offer mini-sessions during which students can complete a full term�s course for credit?

Yes m No l

Summer offerings

  • Limited undergraduate course available

Extended class availability

  • Extensive evening or early morning classes at the undergraduate level.
  • Saturday classes available at the undergraduate level.

Degrees offered by your institution:

  • Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Arts and Sciences
  • Bachelor of Science in Liberal Arts and Sciences
  • Master of Environmental Studies
  • Master in Public Administration
  • Master in Teaching

Check the response that best describes your institution:

  • Liberal arts college/college of arts and sciences

List any unique facilities available to undergraduate students at your institution:

Organic farm, 3,000-feet of waterfront property on the Puget Sound, 1,000 forested acres, Longhouse Education and Cultural Center.

Provide additional information about general characteristics of your institution not covered elsewhere.

Students participate in fully integrated programs that are team taught by faculty, rather than taking separate courses.

  1. Enrollment and Persistence
  2. Institutional Enrollment � Men and Women. Provide numbers of students for each of the following categories as of the institution�s official fall reporting date or as of October 15, 2001.

     

    Full-time

    Part-time

     

    Men

    Women

    Men

    Women

    Undergraduates

     

    Degree-seeking, first-time freshmen

    226

    236

    3

    4

    Other first-year, degree-seeking

    116

    108

    8

    13

    All other degree-seeking

    1124

    1666

    122

    207

    Total degree seeking

    1466

    2010

    133

    224

    All other undergraduates enrolled in credit courses

    4

    6

    67

    91

    Total undergraduates

    1470

    2016

    200

    315

    Graduates

     

    Degree-seeking, first-time

    18

    47

    20

    29

    All other degree-seeking

    20

    27

    30

    30

    All other graduates enrolled in credit courses

    0

    0

    2

    3

    Total graduate

    38

    74

    52

    62

    Total all undergraduates: 4,001

    Total all graduates: 226

    Enrollment by Racial/Ethnic Category. Provide numbers of undergraduate students for each of the following categories as of the institution�s official fall reporting date or as of October 15, 2001.

     

    Degree-seeking first-time, first year

    Degree-seeking undergraduates

    Total undergraduates

    Non-resident aliens

    1

    35

    36

    Black, non-Hispanic

    11

    167

    177

    American Indian or Alaskan Native

    10

    165

    186

    Asian or Pacific Islander

    20

    172

    176

    Hispanic

    18

    163

    175

    White, non-Hispanic

    354

    2556

    2667

    Race/ethnicity unknown

    55

    575

    584

    Total

    469

    3833

    4001

    Fall 2000 non-resident alien graduate enrollment: 3

    Persistence

    Number of degrees awarded by your institution from July 1, 2000 to June 30, 2001:

    Bachelor�s degrees: 1,191

    Master�s degrees: 102

    Graduation Rates

    Report for the cohort of full-time, first-time bachelor�s degree-seeking undergraduate students who entered in fall 1995. Include in the cohort those who entered your institution during the summer term preceding fall 1995.

    Six-year graduation rate for 1995 cohort: 56%

    Retention Rates

    Report for the cohort of all full-time, first-time bachelor�s degree-seeking undergraduate students who entered in fall 2000 (or the preceding summer term). The initial cohort may be adjusted for students who departed for the following reasons: deceased, permanently disables, armed forces, foreign aid service of the federal government or official church mission. No other adjustments to the initial cohort should be made.

    For the cohort of all full-time bachelor�s degree-seeking undergraduate students who entered your institution as freshmen in fall 2000 (or the preceding summer term), what percentage was enrolled at your institution as of the date your institution calculates its official enrollment in fall 2001? 69%

    Percentage of graduates of 4-year programs who typically continue their education within one year of receiving their bachelor�s degrees.

    2% enter law school.

    1% enter medical school.

    3% enter MBA programs.

    11% enter other graduate or professional programs.

  3. FIRST-TIME, FIRST-YEAR (FRESHMEN) ADMISSION

Applications

First-time, first-year (freshman) students. Provide the number of degree-seeking first-time, first-year students who applied, were admitted, and enrolled (full- or part-time) in fall 2001. Include early decision, early action, and students who began studies during summer in this cohort. Applicants should include only those students who fulfilled the requirements for consideration for admission (i.e. who completed actionable applications) and who have been notified of one of the following actions: admission, non-admission, placement on waiting list, or application withdrawn (by applicant or institution). Admitted applicants should include wait-listed students who were subsequently offered admission.

568

Total first-time, first-year (freshmen) men who applied

669

Total first-time, first-year (freshmen) women who applied

459

Total first-time, first-year (freshmen) men admitted

554

Total first-time, first-year (freshmen) women admitted

226

Total full-time, first-time, first-year (freshmen) men who enrolled

3

Total part-time, first-time, first-year (freshmen) men who enrolled

236

Total full-time, first-time, first-year (freshmen) women who enrolled

4

Total part-time, first-time, first-year (freshmen) women who enrolled

Freshman wait-listed students (students who met admission requirements but whose final admission was contingent on space availability). Do you have a policy of placing students on a waiting list?

Yes m No l

First-time, First-year (Freshmen) Admission Requirements

High school completion requirement.

Identify your high school completion requirement for degree-seeking entering students.

  • High school diploma is required and GED is accepted.

If you have special requirements or advice for home-schooled applicants, please describe here:

Home-schooled applicants must satisfy the core subject requirements by providing a detailed transcript of their curriculum. Home-schooled applicants are encouraged to contact Admissions for guidelines.

Does you institution require or recommend a general college preparatory program for degree-seeking students?

  • Yes, required.

Distribution of high school units required and/or recommended. Specify the distribution of academic high school course units required and/or recommended of all or most degree-seeking students using Carnegie units (one unit equals one year of study or its equivalent).

 

 

Units Required

Units Recommended

Total academic units

16

 

English

4

 

Mathematics

3

 

Science

2

 

Of these, units that must be lab

1

 

Foreign language

2

 

Social studies

3

 

Fine/Performing Arts

1

 

Academic electives

1

 

Please use the following lines to write a brief statement about how your admission decisions are reached. If your institution has an open admission policy but has specific admission criteria for certain groups of students or for certain programs, explain those qualifications here.

School achievement record, test scores, diversity factors, and an understanding of interdisciplinary study are all important.

Relative importance of each of the following academic and non-academic factors in your first-time, first-year degree-seeking (Freshmen) admission decisions.

 

Very

Important

Important

Considered

Not

Considered

Academic

 

Secondary school record

l

     

Class rank

     

l

Recommendation(s)

   

l

 

Standardized test scores

l

     

Essay

 

l

   

Non-academic

 

Interview

     

l

Extracurricular activities

   

l

 

Talent/ability

   

l

 

Character/personal qualities

     

l

Alumni/ae relation

     

l

Geographical residence

     

l

State residency

 

l

   

Religious affiliation/commitment

     

l

Minority status

     

l

Volunteer work

   

l

 

Work experience

   

l

 

Indicate your admission policies on interviews, auditions, portfolios and essays:

Essay recommended.

SAT and ACT Policies � Entrance Exams

Does your institution make use of SAT I, SAT II, or ACT scores in ADMISSION decisions for first-time, first-year, degree-seeking applicants? Yes l No m

If yes, indicate your institution�s policies for use in admission.

l SAT I or ACT test scores (no preference) are required.

In addition, does your institution use applicants� test scores for placement or counseling?

Yes m No l

Latest date by which SAT I or ACT scores must be received for fall-term admission:

March 1

The Prueba de Evaluacion y Admision Universataria (the PAA and 3 SAT II tests) is required of applicants to the freshman class? Yes l No m

Freshmen Profile

Provide percentages of ALL degree-seeking full-time and part-time, first-time, first-year (freshman) students enrolled in fall 2001, including students who began studies during summer, international students/non-resident aliens, and students admitted under special arrangements.

Percent and number of first-time, first-year (freshman) students enrolled in fall 2000 who submitted national standardized (SAT/ACT) test scores. Include information for ALL enrolled, first-time, first-year (freshman) degree-seeking students who submitted test scores. Do not include partial test scores (e.g., mathematics scores but not verbal for a category of students) or combine other standardized test results (such as TOEFL) in this item. SAT scores should be

re-centered scores. The 25th percentile is the score that 25 percent scored at or below; the 75th percentile score is the one that 25 percent scored at or above.

Percent submitting SAT scores: 80%

Percent submitting ACT scores: 29%

 

25th percentile

75th percentile

SAT I Verbal

540

650

SAT I Math

480

600

ACT Composite

18

21

Percent of all degree-seeking, first-time, first-year (freshman) students who had high school class rank within each of the following ranges (report information for those students from whom you collected high school rank information).

7

Percent in top 10th of high school graduating class

28

Percent in top quarter of high school graduating class

59

Percent in top half of high school graduating class

41

Percent in bottom half of high school graduating class

11

Percent in bottom quarter of high school graduating class

32

Percent of total first-time, first-year (freshman) students who submitted high school class rank

Percent of all enrolled, degree-seeking first-time, first-year (freshman) students who had high school GPAs within each of the following ranges (using 4.0 scale); report information only for those students from whom you collected high school GPA.

59

Had GPA of 3.0 and higher

40

Had GPA between 2.0 and 2.99

1

Had GPA between 1.0 and 1.99

0

Had GPA below 1.0

Admission Policies and Procedures: Fall 2002

Application fee

Does you institution have an application fee? Yes l No m

Amount of application fee: $35.00 US

Can it be waived for applicants with financial need? Yes l No m

Indicate alternative formats in which your institution�s application is available:

  • Online through college�s own web site.

Application closing date

Does your institution have an application closing date? Yes m No l

Application closing date (fall)? None

Priority date: March 1

Notification to applicants of admission decision sent:

On a rolling basis? Yes l No m beginning December 1

Reply policy for admitted applicants:

l Must reply by May 1 or within 4 weeks if notified thereafter.

Deadline for housing deposit: June 30

Amount of housing deposit: $250.00

Deferred admission: Does your institution allow students to postpone enrollment after admission? Yes m No l

Early admission of high school students: Does your institution allow high school students to enroll as full-time, first-year (freshman) students one year or more before high school graduation?

Yes m No l

Common application: Will you accept the Common Application distributed by the National Association of Secondary School Principals if submitted? Yes m No l

Is your college a member of the Common Application Group? Yes m No l

Early Decision and Early Action Plans

Early decision: Does your institution offer an early decision plan (an admission plan that permits students to apply and be notified of an admission decision well in advance of the regular notification date and that asks students to commit to attending if accepted) for first-time, first-year (freshman) applicants for fall enrollment? Yes m No l

Early action: Do you have a non-binding early action plan whereby students are notified of an admission decision well in advance of the regular notification date but do not have to commit to attending your college? Yes m No l

International Admission Policies

SAT/ACT policies for undergraduate international students:

l SAT I or ACT test scores (no preference) are considered if submitted.

Is TOEFL generally required of non-resident alien applicants? Yes l No m

What is the minimum score you require for unconditional admission?

525

TOEFL � Paper (Range 200-677)

197

Computer (Range 0-300)

What is the average TOEFL score of accepted applicants?

552

TOEFL

212

Computer

Does your institution recognize the Advanced Placement International English Language grade?

Yes m No l

Application fee for undergraduate international student: $35.00 US

Fall 2002 application closing date for undergraduate international students: March 1

Indicate the maximum number of credits that international undergraduate students may take during all summer sessions in a single academic year: 20 quarter hour units

Services available to international students

  • International student adviser
  • Special international student orientation program
  • Housing during summer months for international students

Adult Student Admission Policies

Are the test policies for returning adult students the same as those described on page 7 of this document in the section called "SAT and ACT Policies?" Yes m No l

Please describe special admission policies for returning adult students:

Work and community service experience is considered for returning adults. For guidelines, please contact Admissions.

  1. Transfer Admission

Fall Applicants

Does your institution enroll transfer students? Yes l No m

Provide the number of students who applied, were admitted, and enrolled as degree-seeking transfer students in fall 2001.

 

 

Applicants

Admitted Applicants

Enrolled Applicants

Total

1515

1387

957

Application for Admission

Indicate terms for which transfers may enroll:

  • Fall
  • Winter
  • Spring

Must a transfer applicant have a minimum number of credits completed or else apply as an entering freshman? Yes l No m

What is the minimum number of credits? 40 quarter hour units

Check all items required of transfer students to apply for admission:

 

Required

of all

Recommended

for all

Recommended

for some

Required

for some

Not

required

High school transcript(s)

       

l

College transcript(s)

l

       

Essay or personal statement

   

l

   

Interview

       

l

Standardized test scores

       

l

Statement of good standing from prior institution(s)

       

l

If a minimum high school GPA is required of transfer applicants, specify (on a 4.0 scale): (none)

If a minimum college GPA is required of transfer applicants, specify (on a 4.0 scale): 2.0 GPA

List application priority, closing, notification, and candidate reply dates for transfer students. If applications are reviewed on a continuous or rolling basis, place a mark in the "Rolling admission" column.

 

 

Priority date

Closing

date

Notification

date

Reply

date

Rolling

admission

Fall term

March 1

Sept. 1

Rolling

Rolling

8

Does an open admission policy apply to transfer students? Yes m No l

Describe additional requirements for transfer admission:

Admission decisions are based on a formula that combines GPA, credit earned, satisfactory completion of a variety of courses in the liberal arts and sciences, and diversity factors.

Transfer Credit Policies

2.0

Report the lowest grade earned for any course that may be transferred for credit on a 4.0 scale

90

Maximum number of credits or courses that may be transferred from a two-year institution

135

Maximum number of credits or courses that may be transferred from a four-year institution

45

Minimum number of credits that transfers must complete at your institution to earn a bachelor�s degree

Transfer students entered your institution last year from which 2-year institutions:

South Puget Sound Community College, Tacoma Community College, Pierce College, Seattle Central Community College, Centralia College.

What special services does your institution offer to students transferring INTO your institution:

  • Orientation

What services does your institution offer to those students transferring OUT OF your institution:

  • College fairs/transfer recruitment on campus

Transfer students accepted at the following levels:

  • First-semester freshman
  • Second-semester freshman
  • Sophomore
  • Junior
  • Senior

Percentage of transfer students entering your institution in fall 2001 at the following levels:

 

Entered as first-semester freshman

17

Entered as second-semester freshman

35

Entered as sophomores

40

Entered as juniors

8

Entered as seniors

Percentage of transfer students entering your institution in fall 2001 from 2-year and 4-year programs:

68

Transferred from 2-year programs

32

Transferred from 4-year programs

E. Academic Offerings and Policies

Special study options: Identify those programs available at your institution.

8 Independent study

8 Student-designed major

8 Internships

8 Study abroad

Do you offer GED preparation? Yes m No l

Are you a GED test center? Yes m No l

Do you have a separate undergraduate honors college with different admission requirements and different academic offerings? Yes m No l

Academic Support Services

Identify the academic support services offered to students:

8 Writing center

8 Reduced course load

8 Learning center

8 Study skills assistance

8 Tutoring

 

Are academic support services offered to students in the evenings? Yes l No m

Computing on Campus

Are students required to have a personal or laptop computer? Yes m No l

Number of college-owned workstations available for general student use: 280

Location of workstations: Computer Center

Check off items that apply:

  • Dorms wired for high speed internet connections
  • Dorms wired for access to campus-wide network
  • E-mail accounts provided to all students
  • Commuter/off-campus students can connect to campus network
  • Computer helpline available
  • On-line library
  • Discounted computer software for sale (on-campus bookstore)
  • Student web hosting

Placement and Credit by Examination

Information should reflect policies affecting freshmen entering fall 2002.

Institutional/departmental examinations used for placement, counseling or credit:

Yes m No l

Maximum number of credits awarded for prior work and/or life experiences:

45 quarter hour units

Policy limiting hours of credit by examination that may be counted toward a bachelor�s degree:

135 quarter hour units by examination may be counted toward bachelor�s degree.

Credit and/or placement awarded for International Baccalaureate? Yes l No m

Placement awarded for SAT IIs? Yes m No l

College Board Advanced Placement Program (AP)

Number of freshmen entering in fall 2001 who received placement and/or credit on the basis of AP Examinations: 56

  • Sophomore standing available through AP examinations

Number of year-long AP courses (or equivalent combinations) required for sophomore standing: 6

Number of enrolled students who qualified for regular or conditional sophomore stand in fall 2000: 2

Column 1 and 3: Indicate the lowest AP grade (1-5) at which credit and/or placement is awarded.

Column 2: Indicate number of credit hours a student will receive for the grade specified in column 1.

 

 

(1)

Credit

Grade

(2)

Credit Hours

Awarded

(3)

Placement

Grade

Art History

3

8

 

Art, Studio: Drawing

3

8

 

Art, Studio: General

3

8

 

Biology

3

8

 

Chemistry

3

8

 

Computer Science A

3

8

 

Computer Science AB

3

8

 

English, Language & Composition

3

8

 

English, Literature & Composition

3

8

 

Environmental Studies

3

8

 

French, Language

3

8

 

French, Literature

3

8

 

German, Language

3

8

 

Government & Politics, US

3

8

 

Government & Politics, Comparative

3

8

 

History, European

3

8

 

History, US

3

8

 

Human Geography

3

8

 

Latin, Literature

3

8

 

Latin, Vergil

3

8

 

Macroeconomics

3

8

 

Mathematics, Calculus AB

3

8

 

Mathematics, Calculus BC

3

8

 

Microeconomics

3

8

 

Music Theory

3

8

 

Physics B

3

8

 

Physics C, Electricity & Magnetism

3

8

 

Physics C, Mechanics

3

8

 

Psychology

3

8

 

Spanish, Language

3

8

 

Spanish, Literature

3

8

 

Statistics

3

8

 

College Board College-Level Examination Program (CLEP)

Number of freshmen entering in fall 2001 who received credit on the basis of CLEP examinations: n/a

Number of total students entering in fall 2001 who received credit on the basis of CLEP examinations (including freshmen): n/a

Indicate the minimum score at which credit is generally awarded. Score ranges are on a 20-80 scale of all examinations as of July 1, 2001, when CLEP will be solely a computer-based test (CBT). Indicate your policy for CLEP CBT in this list. The American Council on Education (ACE) recommends awarding credit for scores of 50 for all computer-based CLEP examinations.

 

Examination

Credit

Granting Score

Credit

Hours Awarded

American Literature

46

8

Analyzing & Interpreting Literature

49

8

Composition, Freshman

44

8

English Composition

 

8

English Composition with Essay

 

8

English Literature

46

8

Humanities

 

8

Algebra

46

8

Algebra-Trigonometry

45

8

Biology

46

8

Chemistry

47

8

Calculus with Elem. Functions

47

8

College Mathematics

 

8

Natural Sciences

 

8

Trigonometry

50

8

French, Level 1

39

12

French, Level 2

45

12

German, Level 1

40

12

German, Level 2

48

12

Spanish, Level 1

41

12

Spanish, Level 2

50

12

American Government

47

8

Educational Psychology, Intro. to

47

8

United States History I

45

8

United States History II

45

8

Human Growth & Development

45

8

Macroeconomics, Principles of

44

8

Microeconomics, Principles of

41

8

Psychology, Introductory

47

8

Social Sciences & History

 

8

Sociology, Introductory

47

8

Western Civilization I

46

8

Western Civilization II

47

8

Accounting, Principles of

47

8

Business Law, Introductory

51

8

Information Systems & Computer App.

52

8

Management, Principles of

46

8

Marketing, Principles of

50

8

F. Student Life

Percentages of first-time, first-year (freshman) students and all degree-seeking undergraduates enrolled in fall 2001 who fit the following categories:

 

First-time, first-year

(freshman) students

Undergraduates

Percent who are from out-of-state (excluding international/non-resident aliens)

36

24%

Percent of men who join fraternities

0

0

Percent of women who join sororities

0

0

Percent who live in college-owned, -operated, or -affiliated housing

78

21

Percent who live off campus or commute

22

79

Percent of students age 25 and older

2

34

Average age of full-time students

19

25

Average age of all students (full- and part-time)

19

26

Percentages with minority background/international students

 

First-time, first-year

(freshman) students

Degree-seeking

Undergraduates

Have minority background

14%

16%

International students

1%

1%

Is your campus considered primarily: Residential m Commuter l

Activities offered:

 

8 Dance

8 Radio station

8 Drama/theater

8 Student newspaper

8 Literary magazine

8 Student-run film society

8 Music ensembles

 

Housing: Check all types of college-owned, -operated, or -affiliated housing available for undergraduates:

  • Coed dorms
  • Apartments for married students
  • Apartments for single students
  • Special housing for disabled students

Indicate housing policies at your institution:

  • Guaranteed on-campus housing for freshmen
  • Assistance in locating off-campus housing (not affiliated with the college)

Religious observance required? Yes m No l

List up to ten religious, political, ethnic, and social service organizations available on campus:

 

Native American Students Alliance

Prison Action Committee

Environmental Resource Center

Community Food Pantry

Students of Color Anthology

Peer Health Advocacy Team

Amnesty International

Students for a Free Tibet

Evergreen Queer Alliance

Coalition Against Sexual Violence

Are pets allowed in dorm rooms? Yes m No l

Do you allow first-time, first-year students to have a car on campus? Yes l No m

Intercollegiate athletic association membership:

  • National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA)
 

Intercollegiate

Intramural

Scholarships

Club Sports

Men

Women

Men

Women

Men

Women

Men

Women

Badminton

   

l

l

       

Basketball

l

l

l

l

l

l

   

Cross-country

l

l

   

l

l

   

Fencing

   

l

l

       

Handball

   

l

l

       

Lacrosse

     

l

       

Racquetball

   

l

l

       

Rowing (crew)

           

l

l

Rugby

             

l

Sailing

     


       

Skiing

   

l

l

       

Soccer

l

l

l

l

l

l

   

Softball

   

l

l

       

Swimming

l

l

l

l

l

l

   

Table tennis

   

l

l

       

Tennis

 


l

l



   

Volleyball

 

l

l

l

 

l

l

 

Water polo

   

l

l

       

Weight lifting

   

l

l

       

List other club sports: Gaming Guild, Kung Fu, and Snowboarding

Freshmen Orientation

Freshmen orientation available Yes l No m

Mandatory Yes m No l

Is there a separate charge? Yes m No l

Describe orientation program: Week-long orientation program offers academic and social events to familiarize students with teaching and learning, and resources at the campus.

Services offered by your institution:

  • Adult (re-entering) student services/program
  • Alcohol/substance abuse counseling
  • Career counseling
  • Economically disadvantaged student services
  • Employment services for undergraduates
  • Financial aid counseling
  • Health services
  • Minority student services
  • On-campus daycare
  • Personal counseling
  • Placement service for graduates
  • Veteran�s counselor

Services/facilities for the physically disabled:

  • Wheelchair accessibility
  • Services and/or facilities for visually impaired
  • Services and/or facilities for hearing impaired
  • Services and/or facilities for those with speech or communication disorders

Indicate the type of support services available for students with learning disabilities:

  • Partial services available on an individual, as-needed basis but there are no formal program offered.

G. Annual Expenses

Chief Financial Aid Officer:

Marla Skelley

Title:

Director of Financial Aid

Financial Aid Office Phone:

(360) 867-6205

Title IV Code:

008155

Undergraduate full-time tuition required fees, room and board.

 

2001-2002

Freshmen Costs

Public institution tuition (in-district)

$3024

Out-of-state tuition

$10,674

Required fees

$159

Room & Board (on-campus)

$5610

Provide the estimated expenses for a typical full-time undergraduate student:

 

Residents

Commuters

(living at home)

Commuters

(not living at home

Books and supplies

$780

   

Room only

   

$3647

Board only

 

$2190

$1963

Transportation

$1188

$1704

$1188

Other expenses

$1818

$1818

$1818

2000-2001 Undergraduate per-credit-hour charges:

 

Public institution tuition (in-district)

$101

Out-of-state tuition

$359

Other estimated expenses for international students for academic year: $1,000

H. Financial Aid

Aid Awarded to Enrolled Undergraduates

Enter total dollar amounts awarded to full-time and less than full-time degree-seeking undergraduates in the following categories. Include aid awarded to international students. Aid that is non-need-based but that was used to meet need should be reported in the need-based aid columns.

 

Need-based aid

Non-need-based aid

Scholarships/Grants

 

Federal

$3,221,131

0

State

$2,240,177

0

Institutional and external funds awarded by the college excluding athletic aid and tuition waivers

$649,962

$162,490

Scholarships/grants from external sources not awarded by the college

$225,030

$337,545

Total Scholarships/Grants

$6,336,300

$500,035

Self-Help

 

Student loans from all sources (excluding parent loans)

$8,815,313

$1,441,767

Federal Work Study

$356,972

 

State and other work study/employment

$287,714

0

Total Self-Help

$9,459,999

$1,441,767

Parent Loans

$1,224,256

$121,080

Tuition Waivers

$710,764

$14,505

Athletic Awards

13,065

0

Number of Enrolled Students Receiving Aid

List the number of degree-seeking full-time and less-than-full-time undergraduates who applied for and received financial aid. Aid that is non-need-based but that was used to meet need should be counted as need-based aid.

Note: In the chart below, students may be counted in more than one row, and full-time freshmen should also be counted as full-time undergraduates.

  • 1999-2000 actual numbers. Actual numbers for 2000-2001 will be available in October 2001.

Need-based awards

First-time, full-time

freshmen

Full-time

undergraduates

(including freshmen)

Less than

full-time

undergraduates

a) No. of degree-seeking undergraduate students

705

3370

 

b) No. of students in line (a) who were financial aid applicants

369

2701

147

c) No. of students in line (b) who were determined to have financial need

281

2266

102

d) No. of students in line (c) who received any financial aid

171

2158

81

e) No. of students in line (d) who received any need-based gift aid

136

1817

56

f) No. of students in line (d) who received any need-based self-help aid

117

1633

62

g) No. of students in line (d) who received any non-need-based gift aid

61

97

16

h) No. of students in line (d) whose need was fully met (exclude loans)

121

1057

20

i) On average, the percentage of need that was met of students who received any need-based aid. Exclude any resources that were awarded to replace EFC (i.e. loans)

81

78

70

j) The average financial aid package of those in line (d). Exclude any resources that were awarded to replace EFC (i.e. loans)

$6672

$8059

$5508

k) Average need-based gift award to those in line (e) who received a need-based gift award

$3023

$4219

$1621

l) Average need-based self-help award (excluding loans) of those in line (f)

$2782

$4249

$3087

m) Average need-based loan (excluding PLUS loans and private alternative loans) of those in line (f) who received a need-based loan

$2425

$3868

$2762

Number of Enrolled Students Receiving Non-need-based Grants and Scholarships: List the number of degree-seeking full-time and less than full-time undergraduates who had no financial need and who received non-need-based gift aid. Numbers who reflect the cohort receiving the dollars reported in the preceding chart. Note: In the chart below, students may be counted in more than one row, and full-time freshmen should also be counted as full-time undergraduates.

Non-need-based awards

First-time, full-time

freshmen

Full-time

undergraduates

(including freshmen)

Less than

full-time

undergraduates

n) No. of students in line (a) who had no financial need and who received non-need-based gift aid (excluding those receiving athletic awards and tuition benefits)

18

45

8

o) Average dollar amount of non-need-based gift aid awarded to students in line (n)

$1938

$1879

$1480

p) No. of students in line (a) who received a non-need-based athletic grant or scholarship

146

332

12

q) Average dollar amount of non-need-based athletic grants and scholarships awarded to those in line (p)

1105

1759

1057

Percent of 2001 undergraduate class who graduated between July 1, 2000 and June 30, 2001 and borrowed through any loan program (exclude parent loans). Include only students who borrowed while enrolled at your institution. 50%

Average per-borrower cumulative undergraduate indebtedness of those reported in the previous percentage; do not include money borrowed at other institutions. $12,000

Is need-based financial aid available to full-time students? Yes l No m

Is need-based financial aid available to full-time students? Yes l No m

Do you practice need-blind admissions? Yes l No m

All financial aid based on need? Yes m No l

Aid to Undergraduate Degree-Seeking Nonresident Aliens (Note: reported numbers and dollar amounts are for the 1999-2000 academic year)

  • College-administered financial aid is not available

Process for First-Year/Freshman Students

Check off all financial aid forms that domestic first-year (freshman) financial aid applicants must submit:

  • FAFSA
  • Institution�s own financial aid form

Indicate filing dates for first-year (freshman) students. Does your institution have a deadline for filing required financial aid forms?

Yes l No m

Filing date: March 15

Priority date: February 15

Notification dates for first-year (freshman) students: Students are notified on a rolling basis starting April 15. Students must reply within 4 weeks of notification.

Check off criteria used in awarding institutional aid:

 

Non-Need

Need-Based

Academics

8

8

State/district residency

8

8

Transfer Student Financial Aid Application Procedures

The process outlined in the previous section (Process for First-Year/Freshman Students) is also applied to Transfer Students.

Policies on Reducing and/or Meeting College Costs

Indicate which policies your institution has implemented to help students reduce or meet college costs:

Tuition and/or fee waivers for: Employees

Tuition payment plans: Credit card payment and installment payment

Additional information on financial aid:

Application deadline for merit and cultural diversity scholarships is February 1; for other aid the deadline is February 15. Minority students may apply for tuition and fee waiver scholarships; amount of award equal to in-state tuition and fees. Discount waiver program available for employees. To meet the priority deadline for required financial aid forms the official results of the FAFSA must be received by the Financial Aid Office by March 15.

  1. Instructional Faculty
  2. Please report number of instructional faculty members in each category for fall 2001. "Faculty" is defined as those members of the instructional-research staff whose major regular assignment is instruction, including those with released time for research.

     

    Full-time

    Part-time

    Total number of instructional faculty

    218

    58

    Total number who are members of minority groups

    34

    2

    Total number who are women

    105

    27

    Total number who are men

    113

    31

    Total number with doctorate, first professional, or other terminal degree

    165

    25

  3. Degrees Offered and Awarded
  4. Degrees conferred between July 1, 1999 and June 30, 2000. Provide the percentage of bachelor�s degrees awarded.

    Liberal arts/general studies: 100% Bachelor�s Degrees

  5. Administrative Officers

Chief Executive Officer

Dr. Thomas L. (Les) Purce

Chief Institutional Research Officer

David Marshall

Chief Academic Officer

Enrique Riveros-Schäfer

Enrollment Manager

Steve Hunter

List of Majors

Evergreen undergraduates do not declare majors; they may earn a B.A, B.S. or B.A.S. in Liberal Arts.

Evergreen graduate programs include Master in Teaching, Master of Environmental Studies, and Master of Public Administration.

Graduate Information

  1. General Information
  2. Number of degrees awarded from July 1, 1999 to June 30, 2000: 102 Master�s degrees

  3. Admission PolicY
  4. General admission policy information on the graduate programs:

    Master�s degrees are offered in Environmental Studies (MES), Public Administration (MPA), and in Teaching (MIT). Students are admitted to all three programs for the fall quarter only. Application review dates vary by programs and the closing dates for admission to the programs also vary. The Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is required for admission consideration to the MES program; the GRE Writing Assessment scores are required for admission consideration to MIT. The MPA program does not have a test score requirement.

  5. Student Services

Housing

  • Housing for single students
  • Assistance in locating off-campus housing (not affiliated with the institution)
  • Apartments for married students
  1. International Student Information

Is the TOEFL generally required of applicants at the graduate level?

Yes l No m

What is the minimum score you require for unconditional admission?

550

TOEFL � Paper (Range 200-677)

213

Computer (Range 0-300)

If you require the TOEFL, what is the average score of accepted applicants?

628

TOEFL

267

Computer

Indicate admission test requirements for international students:

  • GRE (Graduate Record Examination) for other graduate study.

Application fee for international students: $35.00 US

Fall 2002 application closing date for graduate international students: April 15

Indicate services available to graduate international students:

  • International student adviser.
  • Special international student orientation programs.
  • Housing during summer months for international students.

Indicate the maximum number of credits that graduate students may take during all summer sessions in a given academic year: 20 quarter hour units

  1. Graduate Annual Expenses
  • Fall 2002-2003 Annual Expenses are not available at this time. Projections will be available after June 1, 2002.
 

2000-2001 Graduate

Expenses

Public Institution Tuition: In district

$4848

Out-of-state tuition

$14769

Required fees

$149

Room and board (on-campus)

$5610

Room and board (commuters)

$2112

Per-credit hour charges

 

2000-2001 Graduate

Expenses

Public Institution Tuition: In district

$162

Out-of-state tuition

$492

Estimate expenses

 

2000-2001 Graduate

Expenses

Books and supplies

$891

Transportation

$1188

Other expenses

$1818

Additional expenses for international students

$1000

  1. Graduate Financial Support

Specify fall 2002 financial aid application dates:

There is no closing date for financial aid applications. However, priority is given to applications received by March 15.

Does your institution award need-based aid to graduate students?

Yes l No m

Indicate the types of financial support available for students in your master�s programs for which the institution selects the recipient:

  • Fellowships/scholarships
  • Grants
  • Other jobs

Graduate International Student Financial Aid

Are graduate international students eligible to receive non-federal aid?

Yes m No l