Master of Public Administration

MPA - Tribal Governance Concentration Curriculum

Year 1

Fall

Context of Public Administration
Core 6 credits

Throughout the 1st year Core the fundamentals of administering for the public good in a globalized world are explored. In Fall quarter we examine the foundations of administration and democracy in an environment where boundaries are no longer clearly defined and public administration is practiced everywhere (e.g., governments, tribes, non-profits, for profits, social entrepreneurial organizations, etc). We focus on the enduring issues of U.S. public administration and the political, social, economic and environmental contexts of effective public administration. Tribal perspectives are vital in the Tribal Cohort course.

Path to Sovereignty
Concentration 4 credits

This course, the first of the 1st Year Tribal Concentration Courses, relates the historical foundations for federal Indian policy to the contemporary legal and political issues confronting Indian tribes as governments. Following an overview discussion of the contemporary role of self-governing Indian tribes, Readings and discussion of the historical period from pre-colonial through the implementation of the 1934 Indian Reorganization Act and overview discussions of the contemporary role of self-governing Indian Tribes form the first component. The balance of the course concentrates on the l, "the modern era" of Indian policy, defined as that period beginning with the foundation of the National Congress of American Indians in 1944 up until the present. Our goal in this first quarter is to gain understanding of the historical origins of the current laws and policies that constitute the legal, economic, social and political environment in which tribal governments operate today and the leadership and persistence of Tribes in the policy formation process.

Winter

Doing Democratic Public Administration
Core 6 credits
Throughout the 1st year Core we explore the fundamentals of administering for the public good in a globalized world. In Winter quarter, we explore what it takes to administer for the public good in a democracy. Our focus is on doing administration (management, organizational theory, etc.) with an emphasis on democracy, democratic processes and the roles and relationships of administrators and citizens in the complex web of democracy. Tribal perspectives are vital in the Tribal Cohort course.

Intergovernmental Relations
Concentration 4 credits
This course, the second of the 1st Year Tribal Concentration Courses, is designed to address the field of intergovernmental relations from the perspective of tribal nations. Different levels of government including tribe-to-tribe, state and local to tribe, tribe to the federal government and its various agencies and tribe to international bodies and other indigenous peoples comprise the governmental relationships that the course seeks to explore. Readings, lectures and assignments cover the historical, legal, theoretical and practical aspects of intergovernmental relations using the framework of the three major functions of government: regulatory, fiscal/taxation and service provisions. Particular focus will be on development of governmental agreements rather than litigation between tribes and states and between tribes and local governments. We will discuss efforts to coordinate "Indian" policy within the executive branch, the development of government-to-government consultation processes for tribal governments within different agencies and the role of intergovernmental agreement-making-processes by different federal agencies. We will also explore state-tribal relations with states and local governments with a focus on assessing the impacts, benefits and limitations of different types of intergovernmental agreements. Students will explore models for agreements in areas such as co-management of fisheries, land use/zoning, land management, law enforcement, tobacco tax/gaming, and social service provision. Class activities will provide an insight into the skills and capacities needed to negotiate and assess various agreements and the special requirements and legal parameters of specific types of agreements.

Spring

Policy Finance and Budget for Public Administration
Core 6 credits

Throughout the 1st year Core we explore the fundamentals of administering for the public good in a globalized world. Spring quarter we examine the policy and fiscal foundations of doing the public's business, building on the concern for democratic administration explored in the Winter quarter and adding a critical element: funding. Public budgets provide dramatic evidence of social priorities. The process for setting priorities, the methods of funding those policies and implementation of those priorities within organizations are central to this course. In addition to public agencies, social priorities and funding are increasingly advanced through non-profit and even for-profit institutions. Examining the changing roles of public, private, and non-profit institutions add to our understanding and practice. Tribal perspectives are vital in the Tribal Cohort course.

Tribal Organizations and Structures
Concentration 4 credits

This course, the second of the 1st Year Tribal Concentration Courses, is designed to address the field of intergovernmental relations from the perspective of tribal nations. Different levels of government including tribe-to-tribe, state and local to tribe, tribe to the federal government and its various agencies and tribe to international bodies and other indigenous peoples comprise the governmental relationships that the course seeks to explore. Readings, lectures and assignments cover the historical, legal, theoretical and practical aspects of intergovernmental relations using the framework of the three major functions of government: regulatory, fiscal/taxation and service provisions. Particular focus will be on development of governmental agreements rather than litigation between tribes and states and between tribes and local governments. We will discuss efforts to coordinate "Indian" policy within the executive branch, the development of government-to-government consultation processes for tribal governments within different agencies and the role of intergovernmental agreement-making-processes by different federal agencies. We will also explore state-tribal relations with states and local governments with a focus on assessing the impacts, benefits and limitations of different types of intergovernmental agreements. Students will explore models for agreements in areas such as co-management of fisheries, land use/zoning, land management, law enforcement, tobacco tax/gaming, and social service provision. Class activities will provide an insight into the skills and capacities needed to negotiate and assess various agreements and the special requirements and legal parameters of specific types of agreements.

Year 2

Fall

Analytical Techniques for Public Service I
Core 6 credits

Our goal is to practice research design and analysis. We will apply multiple ways of knowing by using both quantitative and qualitative methodologies. Our intent is to gain a better understanding of how to approach, critique, use, analyze, and communicate research in tribal governance and administration. In the Fall, we will respond to the following questions: 1) How can we re-frame our approaches to research to serve in the contexts of tribal governance and administration? 2) What is involved in a culturally relevant approach to reading research? 3) How can we understand the relationships between data, information, and decisions? 4) How are analytical techniques practiced in tribal governance and administration? 5) What is the nexus of traditional knowledge, western paradigms, and quantitative/qualitative methodologies?

Tribal Economics
Concentration 4 credits
This class will focus on the unique roles that tribal governments plays in relation to economic, business and community development within Indian reservations and the surrounding areas. As the primary local government within reservation boundaries, tribes are responsible for determining which business enterprises may be licensed, which economic activities are to be permitted for individuals and corporations and which are to be tribally-managed. Tribal governments are responsible for regulating all land uses and to assess the environmental impacts of development proposals. In fulfilling these responsibilities, tribal governments constitute the primary authority charged with safeguarding the public good and protecting the tribal community from any harmful impacts business operations. At the same time tribes strive to create an environment in which legitimate business and commerce may flourish. Tribal governments have the authority to impose taxes on business transactions in order to generate revenue for public services. They must also fund the development of physical infrastructure such as roads, utilities, etc. Tribes are responsible for "community development" which includes construction and maintenance of public housing, schools, health care facilities, public recreation and cultural preservation. In this course, we will examine how tribal governments balance these complex and challenging roles in the context of cultural compatibility within the tribal community and effective integration with surrounding communities and public land-management agencies.

Winter

Analytical Techniques for Public Service II
Core 6 credits
Analytical Techniques II for Tribal Governance is a yearlong core program for second year MPA students. Each quarter focuses on indigenous and traditional knowledge approaches to applied research in public administration and public policy with an emphasis on issues relevant to tribal governments. Each quarter builds on the previous one to create an integrated learning experience. This program begins with the assumption that: through reciprocal community-based research construction, using culturally appropriate methods, interpretation, and with ethical and credible analysis our world can be better understood. The intent is to gain a better understanding of how to approach, critique, use, and present research within the context of tribal governments. The emphasis in this program is to make informed decisions for implementing self-governance.

Tribal Policy
Concentration 4 credits
This course explores tribal regulatory functions and policy-making from internal and external perspectives at the local, regional, national and international levels. The context of the policy-making, and thus decision-making, processes, will be examined from the perspective of building political capacity into tribal institutions. The course is designed to confront complex and changing alternatives through understanding policy analysis skills that build political capacity and contribute to the development of equitable and feasible policy alternatives. The focus on processes and choice among alternatives explores how to determine regulatory apparatus is needed to achieve objectives and what administrative structures are crucial for providing services and achieving policy goals. The course is designed to develop skills and abilities that support these goals, including conflict resolution, negotiation, policy design, and the analysis of alternatives and learning system strategies. Examples may be drawn from critical and current tribal issues tribes including land use planning, cultural resources, the establishment of codes, housing authorities, and implementation of programs like TANF.

Spring

Capstone
Core 6 credits
The second year of Core culminates in the Capstone course in the Spring quarter. In Capstone, students reflect on their work in the program, integrate experiences by looking at their work holistically and demonstrate what they have learned in the program through a demonstration project (usually with an applied focus, working with an agency, tribe, nonprofit organization or other organization doing public work).

Concentration
None
4 Credit Elective
Your choice