End-of-Program Review: Results from AY 06-07 to AY 11-12

Second Five-Year Review

In June 2012 a group of faculty, staff, and students came together in a four-day workshop to synthesize results from the second five-year period of the EPR (2006-2011). A team of 27 participants worked in small groups of two to three members to summarize and present the highlights of the divisional areas (Art, Humanities, Mathematics/Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning, Natural/Physical Science, Social Science) and other learning activities (Writing, Information Technology Literacy, Critical Thinking, Sustainability, Oppression, Privilege and Difference, Community based project/Service Learning, and Compelling Intellectual Experiences). The teams reconvened to discuss issues around advising and mentoring in the context of the new academic statement initiative and the long-range curriculum DTF of 2012-13. Finally, the group redesigned the survey instrument for the next five-year cycle in an effort to clarify survey language and expand the relevance and usability of resulting data.

Five-Year Period Highlights:

  • Generally, there is more opportunity for introductory level work and a little opportunity for advanced level work across the five divisions.
  • There is a steady decline of Art content in the curriculum for the past five years from 66% to 54%.
  • Social Sciences are offered in 77% of the programs; a third of the programs did so at an introductory and a tenth at an advanced level.
  • Mathematics are less represented (45%-58%) across the curriculum than Humanities and Social Sciences, but at a level comparable to Natural/Physical Sciences and Art.
  • There is a constant presence of Humanities across the curriculum, and it’s being taught by every planning unit.
  • Around 75% of the programs offer opportunities to learn information technology literacy. The degree and nature of ITL learning opportunities in programs remained consistent during the five-year period.
  • Critical thinking is included in almost all Evergreen programs, with more than 75% incorporating it at the extensive level.
  • Oppression, privilege and difference slightly decreased in programs in the past five years from 83% to 78%, even though the distribution of the extent at which OPD was taught (whether it was a little, moderate, or extensive) remained consistent.
  • 34% of programs offered at Evergreen included community based projects or service learning; SPBC (19%), Inter-area (17%) and Evening and Week-End Studies (16%) had the most programs with CBP/SL.
  • Almost all programs at Evergreen included writing and writing instruction, but the nature of writing activities and instruction varied between different programs.
  • Sustainability across the curriculum stayed fairly consistent over the four years from 57% to 61%.

Five-Year Period Trends:

  • During the five-year period, 2006-07 to 2010-11, programs addressing three or more divisions moderately or extensively dropped from 43% to 31%, this was offset by an increase in single division programs from 14% to 26%.
  • During the five-year period, single faculty programs grew from 36% in 2006-07 to 53% in 2010-11.
  • During the five-year period, 2006-07 to 2010-11, just over half of all programs were multi-quarter (51% to 56%).

Workshop Summaries:

The Art group found that advanced work opportunities in art are lower in programs, because the need is met through independent studies which are designed as a primary way of getting “Intermediate” and “Advanced” learning.

The Community-based Project/Service Learning group found that all activities seem to take place in the community and involve learning, but there is no evidence of collaboration and partnership with the community organizations. Also, it is not clear that there was reciprocity.

The Compelling Intellectual Experiences group found that the narratives provided by faculty were fairly good teaching standards for Evergreen. Many faculty made statements indicating their programs were compelling or innovative, but it was difficult to tease out examples.

The Critical Thinking group found that while almost all Evergreen programs include critical thinking, there is no way as the survey instrument stands to factor the degree to which each of the aspects of critical thinking  were engaged. Thus, the group proposed changes to the survey to elucidate the specific aspects (moderately or extensively) of critical thinking.

The Humanities group found that humanities are taught in more programs than any of the other four divisions.  Polling all the programs over the five-year period, humanities were taught  55% at introductory level, 57% at intermediate level, and only 28% at advanced level.

The Information Technology Literacy group found that there are many opportunities to learn information technology across the curriculum during this five-year period. However, the institution might benefit more from a better understanding about the depth and nature of the information technology.

The Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning  group found that if Math/QR are present, they are more likely to be present to only “a little” extent and at the introductory level. In addition, the grouping of Math and Quantitative Reasoning led to a certain amount of confusion with respect to level of instruction. For example, if a program had both math and quantitative reasoning, it was unclear which of these were offered at which level.

The Natural or Physical Sciences group found that most of the programs had either and extensive or a little focus, while a limited number of programs had a moderate focus. Also beginning level, low-intensity science is available almost uniformly across the planning units. The science curriculum is dominated by biology, physical sciences, and environmental studies.

The Oppression, Privilege and Difference group recommended adding detail to the question by either offering faculty additional checkboxes or by providing sample answers. They also recommended that the college incentivize development opportunities for faculty who wish to include OPD in their programs.

The Social Sciences group found that the breadth of social sciences offerings in the curriculum seems to be narrow. Social sciences are well represented at the introductory level, but there is a relative lack of social sciences programs at an advanced level. They also found new curricular trend taking place where some content offerings, such as education, and communications, are increasing.

The Sustainability group found reluctance to develop a shared definition of sustainability, the lack of scientific perspective and content related to sustainability, and the survey prompts getting in the way of helping people to provide specific examples.

The Writing group found that there is not enough writing offered as a field of study, at beginning, intermediate, or advanced levels. The group also found that students would benefit from more instruction, whether within programs or as stand-alone courses.

Annual EPR Results AY 06-07 to AY 11-12

Each grid below provides the opportunity to explore results for a particular academic area by type of program or as an overview that summarizes information across all types of programs.

EPR 2011-12

Of the 193 undergraduate programs offered in 2011-12, 136 participated in the End-of-Program Review resulting in a 70% response rate. You can view:

Academic Area
Overview
CS
CTL
EA
ES
IA
SI
SPBC
S&J
TAC
TRI
Art
Natural and Physical Sciences
Humanities
Social Sciences
Math
Writing
Information Technology Literacy
Critical Thinking
Addressing Oppression, Privilege, and Difference
Sustainability
Community-Based Projects/Service Learning
Compelling Intellectual Experiences and Successful Pedagogical Practices
Browse by Program Type

EPR 2010-11

Of the 149 undergraduate programs offered in 2010-11, 100 participated in the End-of-Program Review resulting in a 67% response rate. You can view:

Academic Area
Overview
Core
CS
CTL
EA
ES
IA
SI
SPBC
TAC
TRI
Art
Natural and Physical Sciences
Humanities
Social Sciences
Math
Writing
Information Technology Literacy
Critical Thinking
Addressing Oppression, Privilege, and Difference
Sustainability
Community-based projects/service learning
Compelling Intellectual Experiences and Successful Pedagogical Practices
Browse by Program Type

EPR 2009-10

Of the 175 undergraduate programs offered in 2009-10, 132 participated in the End-of-Program Review resulting in a 75% response rate. You can view:

Academic Area
Overview
Core
CTL
EA
ES
EWS
IA
SI
SPBC
TRI
Art
Natural and Physical Sciences
Humanities
Social Sciences
Math
Writing
Information Technology Literacy
Critical Thinking
Addressing Oppression, Privilege, and Difference
Sustainability
Community-based projects/service learning
Compelling Intellectual Experiences and Successful Pedagogical Practices
Browse by Program Type

EPR 2008-09

Of the 148 undergraduate programs offered in 2008-09, 119 participated in the End-of-Program Review resulting in an 80% response rate. You can view:

Academic Area
Overview
Core
CTL
EA
ES
EWS
IA
SI
SPBC
TRI
Art
Natural and Physical Sciences
Humanities
Social Sciences
Math
Writing
Information Technology Literacy
Critical Thinking
Addressing Oppression, Privilege, and Difference
Sustainability
Community-based projects/service learning
Compelling Intellectual Experiences and Successful Pedagogical Practices
Browse by Program Type

EPR 2007-08

Of the 144 undergraduate programs offered in 2007-08, 116 (81%) participated in the End-of-Program Review. You can view:

Academic Area
Overview
Core
CTL
EA
ES
EWS
IA
NAWIP
SI
SPBC
TRI
Art
Natural and Physical Sciences
Humanities
Social Sciences
Math
Writing
Information Technology Literacy
Critical Thinking
Addressing Oppression, Privilege, and Difference
Sustainability
Community-based projects/service learning
Compelling Intellectual Experiences and Successful Pedagogical Practices
Browse by Program Type

EPR 2006-07

Of the 144 undergraduate programs offered in 2006-07, 118 (82%) participated in the End-of-Program Review. You can view:

Academic Area
Overview
Core
CTL
EA
ES
EWS
IA
SI
SPBC
TRI
Art
Natural and Physical Sciences
Humanities
Social Sciences
Math
Writing
Information Technology Literacy
Critical Thinking
Addressing Oppression, Privilege, and Difference
Community-based projects/service learning
Compelling Intellectual Experiences and Successful Pedagogical Practices
Browse by Program Type